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-   -   3 Part Backsplash question - Moved to Tile Section (http://www.diychatroom.com/f84/3-part-backsplash-question-moved-tile-section-139710/)

Smoke 04-08-2012 09:34 PM

3 Part Backsplash question - Moved to Tile Section
 
3 Attachment(s)
Hello,

I have a 3 part question for everyone about installing a tile/glass backsplash for my kitchen. (All because the wife and a couple of girlfriends thought it woud be easy). Pictures follow....

1. Has anyone ever used the adhesive tile sheet "Bondera" from Lowe's? (Picture of spec sheet attached)

2. Would you remove the bottom trim under the window sill to prevent just a single row of backsplash? (The tile guy that did my bathroom did remove the bottom piece)

3. How close/fancy do you get with the cuts when you get close to the window sill or cabinet trim? I don't want to just get 1/2" away and then just grout and leave a huge grout joint. Pictures are attached...Thanks!

oh'mike 04-08-2012 10:37 PM

Never tried the sticky sheet for holding tile---if you do--tell us how it works---I think that it will fail to hold a wet tile--and tiles get wet when cutting---

I suggest removing the trim below the window stool---replace after setting or leave it off for good.

Use a multi tool or fine bladed saw (Japaneese pull saw) to under cut the window stool--tile wll be placed behind the wood---

what else do you need to know?

P.S.--Back splashes are one of the most challenging projects due to the number of cuts in a small area.

Look at Schluter metal edging to hide your end cuts,if you will have an exposed end---Mike----

chicagoremodeli 04-08-2012 11:04 PM

I suggest that you do remove the bottom because it will look better and when ever im in this situation i always do. And don't worry about getting fancy or close with the cuts just make sure it's not to big. Either way you need to grout it so in the end if you do make a bigger cut you won't be able to see it easily because the hole back-splash will come to it. Take your time and you will be fine :)

Smoke 04-09-2012 07:54 PM

Thank you guys for responding...I will take off the trim and leave it off. I'll let you know how the Bondera goes....I hate when my wife talks to her girlfriends!!!!

chicagoremodeli 04-09-2012 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smoke (Post 895332)
Thank you guys for responding...I will take off the trim and leave it off. I'll let you know how the Bondera goes....I hate when my wife talks to her girlfriends!!!!

Please if you can post the after picture I'm really looking forward to it! and GOOD LUCK!!

Smoke 04-09-2012 09:13 PM

It might be a few months!!!! :)

Ironlight 04-09-2012 10:11 PM

I finished installing a backsplash of minature glass subway tiles a couple of weeks ago. Some advice:

1) If this is your first tile project, GO SLOW. Mix enough thinset to hang one or two sheets, get them on and let them set before you move on to do more. Nothing ruins a project faster than rushing something you've never done before because you want to use a big bucket of cement before it sets.

2) Take those little spacers you bought and throw them in the trash. Do it by eye. The tiles on each sheet vary in spacing a bit, and the 1/8" spacers are too big for glass tile. Before you know they will push things around and your whole layout will be skewed.

3) Edges matter. You can do trim to hide them, but nothing makes a tile job look more professional than having tile perfectly cut to line up along window casings and cabinetry. Measure twice and cut once.

4) Make sure your thinset is thick/stiff enough. The last thing you want is to come back 30 minutes later to find out a sheet has sagged down the wall even just a little bit. Glass tile is heavy. Your thinset should be stiffer than peanut butter.

5) Pull off that wood trim under the window, not only because tiling under (and more so, grouting) will be a nightmare but also because that close to the counter it's going to get wet. Better to have tile there than wood.

6) I bought a sheet of masonite and cut it into longer pieces that I laid on the counter tight to the wall as I worked. The 1/8" thickness acted as a spacer between the counter and the bottom of the time, protected the counter from tools and errant cement, and was easy to pull out after the cement set. Best idea I had and glad I did it.

7) TAKE YOUR TIME. Go slow while you get a feel for working with the cement, cutting tile, placing, etc.

Smoke 04-10-2012 08:13 AM

Thanks for the replies...I'll be sure to take before and after pics.

NewHomeDIYGuy 04-10-2012 10:31 AM

I know most folks aren't a big fan of it, but for backsplashes, I think mastic is the perfect application (or premixed thinset is what it's called in the big box stores). It holds things in place very well, and since it's not going to regularly be directly exposed to water, it's the right application for it. If you don't want to deal w/ the hassle of mixing batches of thinset, I'd consider buying a small tub of mastic. I've never seen that tile adhesive on a roll stuff. If you use it, let us know how it works. As others said.. try and get your cuts very close to the edges (leave an 1/8" gap for caulk). You can be slightly off due to the caulk filling the gap, but you don't want to leave a big gap.

Dangchores 04-10-2012 04:35 PM

I'm going to do a backsplash in that Identical tile. I have 20 1/2 ft X 16" tall. Haven't yet decided how I want to handle the picture framed window. I've thought that I could cut it really close or remove it and do a back cut so it sits on top of the tile (windowframe edge is 8 1/4" above countertop). The 16" height is looking like it will work to my advantage since the bottom of all 6 outlets are 4" above the countertop.

I have a rough surface left by the glue backing from the old laminate backsplash that I am considering covering with Redgard and thinset on top of that. Overkill?

Dangchores 04-10-2012 04:44 PM

1. Has anyone ever used the adhesive tile sheet "Bondera" from Lowe's? (Picture of spec sheet attached)

Do a quick search and you will find that it is Expensive, hard to work with and too thin for even moderately rough surfaces.


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