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Old 12-20-2011, 09:38 AM   #106
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We'll have to rename this thread after the Energizer Bunny, it just keeps on going........

Matt,
nice fix, did you call tile redi and send them a bill for it? This product seems to be one of the most contraversial items I have ever seen. Interesting reading.
Mike Hawkins

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Old 12-20-2011, 12:50 PM   #107
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...and that's just the ones we hear about here! Can you imagine how many of those things are in landfills by now all around the country out of total frustration?
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:11 PM   #108
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Installed a 42x66 Tile ready pan with no problems until today. Installing 1/2 inch hardie board and dropped a piece on the pan. Now I have a hole in the pan with a small crack. I've thought about this long and hard today and need some help.
1. I thought maybe I could fill the hole with shower mud mix since it will not expand. Then smooth out - and tile over it.
2. Mix up a batch of epoxy and repair the hole, then tile. Will epoxy have problems with the poly pan?
3. Have read on here about folks using kerdi fix in the pan and covering the whole pad with kerdi. Then tiling with regular thinset. This might be the best

Help!!!!! Any ideas please send them to me, do not want to remove all of this and start over.
Brad
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Old 12-31-2011, 12:10 AM   #109
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Originally Posted by bayork
Installed a 42x66 Tile ready pan with no problems until today. Installing 1/2 inch hardie board and dropped a piece on the pan. Now I have a hole in the pan with a small crack. I've thought about this long and hard today and need some help.
1. I thought maybe I could fill the hole with shower mud mix since it will not expand. Then smooth out - and tile over it.
2. Mix up a batch of epoxy and repair the hole, then tile. Will epoxy have problems with the poly pan?
3. Have read on here about folks using kerdi fix in the pan and covering the whole pad with kerdi. Then tiling with regular thinset. This might be the best

Help!!!!! Any ideas please send them to me, do not want to remove all of this and start over.
Brad
Call the company and ask what to use just to be on the safe side.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:48 AM   #110
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Hello everyone. I'm new to this thread and have joined because my husband and I are adding a new bathroom to our upstairs. We have to do something custom because the back end of the shower will be on an angled ceiling. The walls are down to studs and we are just beginning to run plumbing for everything. We were looking into the TileRedi shower pans and accessories to build a custom 37' x 60' walk-in shower with an integrated seat. After reading this thread, I am not sure I want to pursue that product because of all the troubles. My husband is no pro, but he is quite handy and has so far rebuilt our entire second floor. I spent quite some time reading this blog and would love someone to give an overall thought on IF we were to use the TileRedi- what's the best plan? And if you recommend NOT to use the TileRedi- how else can we build a beautiful walk-in shower? We did look at a Kohler Base but I believe we only tile the walls around using a product like that. Maybe that will be our best bet? I appreciate any thoughts and suggestions! Thank you!
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Old 01-29-2012, 02:22 AM   #111
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Hi...did a search on Tile-Redi and found this thread...glad I did. My question is...what's the difference between Tile-Redi and the KBRS tileable shower bases?
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Old 01-29-2012, 04:33 AM   #112
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Never heard of those---post a link--
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:20 AM   #113
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Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
Before I did anything I first talked with Schluter and they told me KERDI was not compatible with epoxy thinset. In fact a senior tech rep said the epoxy would eat the KERDI. That's all I have to go on...
Bud I have not heard about epoxy thin-set eating away at Kerdi before. Does Epoxy grouts and urethane grouts have the same effect?

With the AKW Shower Pan you waterproof with a liquid membrane system from Mapei called Mapegum WPS and then you can use any thin set you wish. I have spoken with many tile setters over the past couple years who refuse to work with epoxy "Anything".

You really need to look closely at both the AKW system and the Tile Ready system to understand how much better a product the AKW system is.

I can only imagine the $%%^& ups with epoxy thin-set for first time users. I installed some pebble flooring about 5 years back with Epoxy thin-set and that was enough for me. Never again.

John Whipple
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Old 02-12-2012, 07:50 PM   #114
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Just set my 3060l pan in tileredi recommended quickrete. Fingers crossed but now I'm not so optimistic there wont be deflection. Maybe ill just have myself a nice $600 black shower pan. Oh they make it look so easy on their install video.
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:33 AM   #115
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Putting in a new bathroom because I adopted 3 pre-teen/teen kids from Ethiopia, and now they are sharing one bathroom with one sink with my 3 biological kids. So far, no problems, but it's a timebomb that will eventually explode.

Okay, so the pan went in well. There are no leaks and the floor seems solid. I followed the advice of many to use Versabond.

Here's where I went wrong. Assuming that the pan was pitched toward the drain, I didn't taper the Versabond as it approached the center of the pan, where the drain is. I guess the pan is pitched, but you still need to account for the pitch when laying down the mortar. Now, I have standing water in about 2/3 of the pan, about 1/4" at its deepest.

So, it looks like I'm going to turn a perfectly good pan into a perfectly good bed liner. Any suggestions? Can I simply Versabond the floor and float the floor with a pitch, or do I need to use some sort of epoxy? How deep should the bed be? Should I bring the backerboard all the way down to the floor, or simply leave it at the flashing?

Any advice? You guys have been so helpful so far.

Indyman777
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Old 02-19-2012, 03:44 PM   #116
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I had to join this website just to comment on Tile Redi shower pans. I wish I would have found this before I purchased!!! Absolute Garbage!! I even read a good number of reviews and info before purchasing but missed this one.

I have done extensive tiling jobs and all kinds of repairs and construction projects, but this has been my worst experience with a product to date.

I had the exact same deflection problems with most of the pan above the mortar bed. When I tried to 'set' the pan better into the mortar to eliminate the deflection it got worse. Eventually, I actually broke the pan (cracked the corner out). Over $700 for the pan and equipment.

I spent the rest of the day breaking the semi-set mortar bed back out of my bathroom. I will never shortcut again!!!

This company should be ashamed of themselves. I agree with previous posts that if you have to circumvent the manufacturer's directions to get the product to work than it is a FAILED PRODUCT. Absolutely worthless and I can see that I am one of many that feel this way.

Hopefully, this will sway others away from this product and similar headaches in the future.
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Old 02-20-2012, 10:58 AM   #117
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Originally Posted by indyman777 View Post
Putting in a new bathroom because I adopted 3 pre-teen/teen kids from Ethiopia, and now they are sharing one bathroom with one sink with my 3 biological kids. So far, no problems, but it's a timebomb that will eventually explode.

Okay, so the pan went in well. There are no leaks and the floor seems solid. I followed the advice of many to use Versabond.

Here's where I went wrong. Assuming that the pan was pitched toward the drain, I didn't taper the Versabond as it approached the center of the pan, where the drain is. I guess the pan is pitched, but you still need to account for the pitch when laying down the mortar. Now, I have standing water in about 2/3 of the pan, about 1/4" at its deepest.

So, it looks like I'm going to turn a perfectly good pan into a perfectly good bed liner. Any suggestions? Can I simply Versabond the floor and float the floor with a pitch, or do I need to use some sort of epoxy? How deep should the bed be? Should I bring the backerboard all the way down to the floor, or simply leave it at the flashing?

Any advice? You guys have been so helpful so far.

Indyman777
Now I want to give an update which hopefully will prove helpful for others. After speaking with Tile Redi, they said the problem was most likely that I didn't have the drain stubbed low enough, so it forced the center of the shower pan up. There's a slight chance there could have been a problem with the manufacturing. So, my first piece of advice is to check the pitch before installing it. I believe I had the drain stubbed plenty low as the pipe doesn't quite reach the top of the stop on the drain flange.

So, here's how I solved the problem. They recommended that I purchase another set of epoxy and build the pan up. Knowing how fast that stuff sets up, I didn't want to go this route. So, I simply cut a piece of cement board to fit the bottom of the pan. I then cut a hole for the flange and then cut the cement board from corner to corner to create a 4 quandrant system. Then, I mortar'd the pitch into the bottom of the pan using VersaBond at 3/4" from the bottom of the pan around the edges. After that, it was a matter of placing the four quadrant pieces into the mortar and sealing the seams with mortar and fiberglass tape.

It took an hour or two, but it is now very solid and has a great pitch. Why did I use the cement board? I wanted to get a very even pitch throughout the pan and didn't know how good I would be at troweling the pitch. It was very simple to lay the cement board in it and press it into the cement to get a perfect slope.

That said, I'm not sure whether I'd use the Tile Redi system again since I am getting more familiar with using mortar, but I wouldn't avoid it out of fear. However, for the novice, I wouldn't shy away from using it as long as you read the "helpful" advice on this board. Most of the negative responses have been from handymen who have some expertise in the field and feel that there are too many negatives with the system for it to be worthwhile. For those with little skill, the benefits could outweight the positives. Just my two cents...
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Old 02-20-2012, 05:18 PM   #118
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Now I want to give an update which hopefully will prove helpful for others. After speaking with Tile Redi, they said the problem was most likely that I didn't have the drain stubbed low enough, so it forced the center of the shower pan up. There's a slight chance there could have been a problem with the manufacturing. So, my first piece of advice is to check the pitch before installing it. I believe I had the drain stubbed plenty low as the pipe doesn't quite reach the top of the stop on the drain flange.

So, here's how I solved the problem. They recommended that I purchase another set of epoxy and build the pan up. Knowing how fast that stuff sets up, I didn't want to go this route. So, I simply cut a piece of cement board to fit the bottom of the pan. I then cut a hole for the flange and then cut the cement board from corner to corner to create a 4 quandrant system. Then, I mortar'd the pitch into the bottom of the pan using VersaBond at 3/4" from the bottom of the pan around the edges. After that, it was a matter of placing the four quadrant pieces into the mortar and sealing the seams with mortar and fiberglass tape.

It took an hour or two, but it is now very solid and has a great pitch. Why did I use the cement board? I wanted to get a very even pitch throughout the pan and didn't know how good I would be at troweling the pitch. It was very simple to lay the cement board in it and press it into the cement to get a perfect slope.

That said, I'm not sure whether I'd use the Tile Redi system again since I am getting more familiar with using mortar, but I wouldn't avoid it out of fear. However, for the novice, I wouldn't shy away from using it as long as you read the "helpful" advice on this board. Most of the negative responses have been from handymen who have some expertise in the field and feel that there are too many negatives with the system for it to be worthwhile. For those with little skill, the benefits could outweight the positives. Just my two cents...
You've got to be kidding me. After spending $700 on a pos system, then having them admit it may be bad, you cob on some cement board and call it a good system. I'm surprised Tile Redi is even still in business.
Mike Hawkins
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Old 03-01-2012, 08:42 PM   #119
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I had planned to use the Tile Redi shower pan for a new DIY installation before discovering this forum. Iíve read / re-read this thread from beginning to end, and have found it very helpful and entertaining, because it identified a number of great installation tips and errors to avoid. I am still planning to use the Tile Redi product, because there seems to be a very simple solution to the biggest problems reported. Bottom line is that key elements of Tile Rediís original installation instructions were bad, and now they have been revised. Here is what I learned from this thread, and will apply during my installation.

1. The biggest problem reported was flexing of the shower base after installation on a dry mortar bed per the Tile Redi installation video. Installation on a dry mortar bed seems to make it difficult to achieve uniform and complete contact between the support fins/ribs on the bottom of the shower pan and the mortar, either due to excessive unevenness in the mortar bed or base, or to the tendancy of the dry mortar bed to compact and not support the base in places, or to someone compressing one part of the mortar bed too much during or after installation of the pan (by pushing too hard on one corner when attempting to level it, stepping into the pan, or pushing down around the drain area to glue up the drain fitting to the house plumbing). This post-installation flexing problem was ďsolvedĒ by one contributor by drilling holes through the base and screwing it down to the subfloor, and then applying a waterproofing membrane over the bed to seal the screw holes. Other contributors drilled holes into the base and backfilled the voids underneath with some product, followed by application of the waterproofing membrane.

2. This flexing problem was AVOIDED ALTOGETHER by other contributors who, after becoming aware of this issue through sad experiences described on this thread, used either a non-expanding polyurethane spray-foam bed, or a wet mortar / high adhesion thinset bed instead of a dry mortar bed. These alternative beds apparently allowed the fins/ribs of the Tile Redi base to settle into and make uniform contact with the bed material, and further provided adhesion to the shower pan base, essentially bonding it into place. I noted that these contributors did not attempt to fully fill the areas between the fins of the base -- they just wanted to insure that the fins were uniformly supported, and had good adhesion between bed and base. The pdf installation file from Tile Redi now recommends using products like Laticrete 255 or 4-XLT, or Quickrete Mortar Mix 1102. The 1102 is a wet mortar intended for laying brick or block, so apparently Tile Redi got the message that having a wet, compliant bed material was a better idea than a dry mortar base . This same Tile Redi pdf file also recommends using enough mortar to fill between the ribs, which seems like a bit of overkill, and also rather difficult to accomplish in practice Ė how would you know if you had really filled between the ribs?? In any event, a wet bed seems to be a proven successful approach. Sadly, the Tile Redi video still shows the dry mortar approach, and is inconsistent with their pdf installation instructions. I guess thatís why DIY forums are so useful !!

3. Some folks worried about how to repair cracks, holes or replace pieces which broke off of the Tile Redi base. Polyurethane based glues / caulks can be used to repair these problems (PL or Loctite make a great one in the standard 10 oz / 28 oz caulking gun tubes) -- this stuff has incredible adhesion strength with many materials and works great. Iíve used it a lot for laying stone walls, and Iím sure that it has far better adhesion than any mortar or thinset.

4. Most folks really did not like using the epoxy mortar supplied to set the tiles into the shower base Ė messy, quick setting, barely enough supplied, and expensive to buy more. I guess that Iíll find out soon enough. But I would also guess that buttering out / troweling the polyurethane adhesive (or applying beads directly from the caulking gun) would also work just fine for horizontal tile application if you use relatively small tiles, like 4x4" or smaller Ė you just have to bear in mind that the poly is not stiff enough to prevent the tile from moving down a slope unless you use some kind of spacers. If your tile is already on a mesh grid, all the better. The only problem you might ultimately face is that you will NEVER be able to remove the tile from the shower base if you want to change design or color without destroying the base Ė you will have to tile over the existing tile.

So Iím off to order my Tile Redi 34 x 60 right drain shower pan!
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Old 03-01-2012, 08:57 PM   #120
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Jon,
you've provided a nice summation of this thread and added a little with the changes tile redi made, but I find it hard to believe anyone would still want to use one of these. I have used the schluter system with good results, no hocus pocus, no voodoo incantations, etc. Plus its about half the price, and if you did screw something up, it's easily repairable.
For the record, I found the epoxy thinset worked well with the plastic. I wouldn't use anything else. I did have to divvy it up by guessing, but it worked. The other thing going for schluter is they stand behind their products. Let us know how you make out.
Mike Hawkins

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