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Old 03-16-2011, 08:59 PM   #31
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


I sure hear alot of whining about tile redi ,here are the pros & cons PRO When properly installed , they save a ton of labor & provide a perfectly sloped & waterproof base. CON They are expensive(but so are call backs & leaks) the drain cover options leave a little to be desired for the money(looks cheap & scratches easily) the drain connection is a pain ( I spoke to a rep. at a contractor event about switchein it to an industry standard caulkless drain body) the epoxy thin set is apain to work with & doesent stick to the base perfectly ( Tile-redi should think about moulding some tooth to the inside) Dont be in a hurry , start with a sound level base, keep it clean , don't buy cheap thinset mortar to set the base with , get some graduated containers to measure out a portion of the epoxy so you will have some to set the wall tiles that ciontact the walls & curb ( the epoxy kit costs @ $ 100- $130 from Mapei) & don't take this project on unless you are very confident with your skill set I've personally set @ 10 of these pans & once you know the secret instructions they are great to work with but not for amateurs I also recommend A 2"x2" MOSAIC for the bottom once properly installed thes things are practicatlly bullet proof.

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Old 03-17-2011, 04:40 PM   #32
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Just repeating the above information from expert advice:

PRO: (1)
1. they save a ton of labor & provide a perfectly sloped & waterproof base


CONS: (6+)
1. They are expensive
2. the drain cover options leave a little to be desired
3. looks cheap & scratches easily
4. the drain connection is a pain
5. the epoxy thin set is apain to work with & doesent stick to the base
6. once you know the secret instructions they are great to work with but not for amateurs
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Old 05-08-2011, 05:32 PM   #33
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Bud cline , could you help me with a few ?? I bought the tile ready pan 60/46 and this thing has been a big pain the the as!!! I put it down once but had a lot of movement so pulled it back up and done it again. This time just a little movement so I am going to screw it down like you did , but the pan crack in about 4 spot. I was going to put the kerdi mat reliner what did you use to glue it to the pan and what can you use to glue the tile to it . Would you use kerdi on the wall all the way to the top... thanks sorry for all the ??
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Old 05-08-2011, 10:21 PM   #34
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After two attempts I used MAPEI Ultracontact - 100# instead of the mortar bed. After nine months of use I am happy to say that the shower bed is working great. There is no flex. When you step on the shower bed you get a very firm feeling of support. The Title Redi instructions to use a mortar base just did not work for me. Use a compound lke MAPEI Ultracontact and save yourself some trouble.
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Old 05-09-2011, 12:23 PM   #35
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Quote:
cortez: "Bud cline , could you help me with a few ?? I bought the tile ready pan 60/46 and this thing has been a big pain the the as!!! I put it down once but had a lot of movement so pulled it back up and done it again. This time just a little movement so I am going to screw it down like you did , but the pan crack in about 4 spot. I was going to put the kerdi mat reliner what did you use to glue it to the pan and what can you use to glue the tile to it . Would you use kerdi on the wall all the way to the top... thanks sorry for all the ??"
I used a product called KERDI Fix available from Schluter Systems via Home Depot or any real tile store. KERDI Fix comes in a tube, you would have to dispense it from the tube then spread it with a putty knife to get 100% coverage. That would be my only suggestion. It will take two tubes.

I'm not convinced any of the thinset products will stick to the base material. In fact, I'm sure it won't.

Mapei Ultra Contact is a medium-based thinset product that would be way too thick for this type of application in my opinion.
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Old 05-09-2011, 05:45 PM   #36
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Bud,

I wonder if there is a misunderstanding of where I used the thin set.
I used the thin set to set the shower pan, not to set the tile inside of the shower pan.

I know as an experienced tile person that you have at sometime removed floor tile, or shower/bath tile that was placed using thin set. When removing the floor tile it has been my experince that --first - if the tile was buttered properly the tile is hard to remove and usally has to be broken, second - that the thin set will be bonded quite well to the substrate and has to be hammered at times to remove it - third - that the thin set bonds to the dry wall tight enough that the paper is also tore off with the tile.

I used the thin set to bond the shower pan to the substrate. The tile installed inside the shower pan was set using the recommended epoxy material.

Thin set is used in may ways to hold tile inplace on many different substates. Plywood, dur-rock, sheet rock, etc.. Thin set is also used to set tile that is placed on a ceiling application.

I also know that the show pan is firm and does not flex when stepped on. The tile grout is solid and the tile has remained in place.
What more do you want?
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Old 05-09-2011, 06:03 PM   #37
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Quote:
I wonder if there is a misunderstanding of where I used the thin set.
Yup, I misunderstood. Using the thinset (under) the pan would be okay as far as I can see.

Using the thinset to set tile directly to the "plastic" Tile-Redi shower pan would not be a good idea.

I have used regular mortar products under those type of shower and tub bases for years without a hitch. Sandmix, mortar mix, etc. Never seen a need to use thinset I guess because of the cost. But I have never used the Tile-Redi product in any of my projects. The pan being referred to by cortez is a pan that was purchased by the homeowner and installed by her plumber. It wasn't until things went to hell with her project that I was called. She was a homeowner that was going to piece-meal her bathroom remodel one handyman at a time. She was a know-it-all doctors wife that knew everything there was to know about everything there is.
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Old 05-09-2011, 07:25 PM   #38
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


I would use a Tile Redi pan again in an application where the extra cost was not a major concern. I do not feel that the Tile Redi pan will ever leak as long the subflooring is solid and the tile walls are sealed correctly.

This whole web site has been a joint learning process.
I hope our misadventures and experiences will save some other person from having a similar a problem.
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Old 05-09-2011, 07:57 PM   #39
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I just noticed this thread has had about 15,000 hits. I wonder how that equates to lost-sales for Tile-Redi.
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:59 AM   #40
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I'm in the same boat as others here with a flexing tile redi pan. Not a lot of flex, but any concerns me. I want to now screw it down and apply kerdi fix and kerdi to it. My question: how long and what type should the screws be? Looking at the schematic it looks like they should be about 3 inches, but if someone could let me know what they used successfully, that would be helpful. I imagine they were counter sink screws in order to not have them bumping up? And did you pre drill for them? Thanks! P.S. I'm screwing into wood subfloor, not cement.
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Old 06-09-2011, 08:51 AM   #41
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Looking at the schematic it looks like they should be about 3 inches, but if someone could let me know what they used successfully, that would be helpful. I imagine they were counter sink screws in order to not have them bumping up? And did you pre drill for them? Thanks! P.S. I'm screwing into wood subfloor, not cement.

Did you read the referenced thread?

Three inch screws should be fine and they must be pre-drilled and countersunk.
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Old 06-10-2011, 02:25 PM   #42
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After reading this thread a dozen times, and despite the negative sentiment, I went ahead and successfully installed a 30x60 TileRedi shower pan. In the past, I've mudded a large custom walk-in shower pan, and after I did that once, my novice DIY'r status reminded me not to do that again unless I really had to. The TileRedi install, in contrast, was a breeze and there should be no fear if you follow what I did. Yes, expensive - the pan came to just over $700 shipped w/ the optional flashing kit and the square drain cover. The tips people offered were really helpful, and I had some helpful information to add. I detailed out the installation of the TileRedi shower pan on my blog.

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Old 06-10-2011, 06:18 PM   #43
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You tried this $700 marvel after reading all the failures and horror stories?

Interesting.
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Old 06-10-2011, 07:36 PM   #44
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Mike did you read the guys blog?
You must admit there are many geniuses in the world whose only satisfaction in life is to prove someone else wrong about something. I do appreciate the slam though, I've gotten used to it around these DIY forums so why not in the blog of a superior intellect person, wouldn't want to be forgotten.

Now I must go to my spellcheck to be sure I have spelled all of the above big-words correctly. In fact a spellcheck would be good advice for the blogger also from what I saw.

Adios!
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Old 06-15-2011, 09:26 PM   #45
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Hey, how did it turn out in the end?

I installed my Tile Redi base as instructed, with plenty of mortar. For some reason I had some deflection near the curb. With a concrete slab underneath (Florida single story house) the best thing i could come up with was to drill a hole through the side of the curb and run more mud through a tube and fill the void. Now I can walk all over it with no creaks or deflection.

I have noticed some very thin cracks that seam to run through the base. I had already planned to line the walls with Kerdi, but might as well cover the base too now. So my question is:

Why did you attach the Kerdi with Kerdi fix and not the epoxy the base comes with?

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