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Old 06-21-2012, 11:01 PM   #136
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hi
My family is doing a bathroom rennovation and we installed the tile redi shower pan. We hired someone to do the tiling, and before we had the chance to tell him to use the latapoxy epoxy that came with the pan, he had used regular tile mortar to adhere the tile to the pan. Will applying the mortar instead of the epoxy affect the shower at all? I'm kinda worried that we'll have to rip everything out and pay more money

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Old 06-22-2012, 03:30 PM   #137
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Pretty good chance that regular thinset won't stick very well to the slick plastic the pan's made out of. Doesn't anybody read directions anymore? Did he wonder what those two bags of epoxy were there for? I would call him back and have him take a look at the pan to redo it.
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Old 08-18-2012, 03:52 AM   #138
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Thanks to all for adding to this very, very valuable thread. i've been contemplating the Tile Redi system out of fear of screwing up a traditionally poured shower bed. And thanks to you Bud. I don't care what anyone says you are in my book.

It was mentioned that Laticrete has a new one piece system and after some research it seems pretty awesome and easy. It's pricey, but that's only after checking one website. A local dealer near me may have a better price. But the cool thing is that I can get the base, curb, nitch, seat, and enough sealant for less money than the Tile Redi system, and I'm confident the Laticrete is a superior product IMO. Just the fact that I can waterproof the entire shower by rolling on their sealant is worth it to me. Don't even need to use tape for the seams as the sealant is rated to join gaps up to 1/8". On the site below, the above mentioned configuration is $704 including shipping. The same configuration with Tile Redi products would be $849 before any shipping. And I'm not a Pro, but from all the research I've done many Pros stand behind Laticrete on these DIY sites. Both systems are still overly expensive in my opinion, but at this point, it's a choice of going on the cheap and messing something up or paying the extra $$ for something I'm confident in the quality and my ability to install.

I do have one question. Can I install a 2"x2" mosaic tile on a 12"x12" mesh backer on a rounded/convex seat like in this link http://www.laticrete.com/contractors...uctid/143.aspx

Thank again for ALL on this thread. I hope to post back in a few months after this project is complete.



Sales reps showing installation


Place I've priced
http://www.stonetooling.com/default.asp

Last edited by bluscreened; 08-18-2012 at 04:14 AM.
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:10 PM   #139
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hi All

Wish I found this thread earlier as I just finished the install of a zero threshold Tile redo (Ha, auto correct knows something) 38x42 inch shower pan.

While I did find the product more difficult to work with then I had thought it would be, I did achieve a successful install and will share my tips.

Since I was doing a zero threshold with building up the surrounding floor to meet the walk in edge, my tolerances had to be spot on to avoid lippage from base to floor.

Starting with my subfloor I used 5/8" Exterior Grade plywood and framed to that for the enclosure. Then I built up the floor with an additional 1/2 plywood glued to the subfloor and Hardie Backer 500 set in thin set for my finished substrate.

Prior to laying and glueing the surrounding floor build up I installed the Tile Redi shower Pan on the subfloor and per their instructions made a mortar bed using quickrete mortar mix 1102. The first install attempt I laid the mortar bed, placed the pan onto that and soft hammered it down. Easy I thought, but now I had a pan 1/2" higher than I could work with so out it came.

2nd attempt, I reduced the amount of mortar in the bed and set it again. This time I had a closer tolerance but also had flexing and soft spots under the pan that I couldn't live with. So up it came again.

Finally after reading up on the pan that was about to get sent back to Florida, I found that Tile Redi states the mortar bed is just necessary to fill the gaps between the ribs on the backside of the base.

So final solution, I turned the base over and just back buttered the entire thing filling in all the gaps between the ribs and leveled that out from the drain to the sides. I then applied a thin base of mortar into the enclosure, took the now 100 Lbs shower pan and carefully fit it into place.

Walla, The pan sat perfectly level, had no flexing and my tolerance was a mere 1/8th" off the finished floor build up which I made up with thin set when I set the hardie backer.

After a 20 day break for a vacation, I'm back on the project and the mortar is all cured and that pan is rock solid in place. The seam between the pan and my raised floor is perfect.

So Moral of the story. This pan is a pain in the ass to work with, but with the limited options for zero threshold pans out there I had to make it work. If you're gonna use one, just back butter all the ribs with a thick mortar, a thin base to set it in and get a friend to help you place it.

I'm now going to apply red gard to the walls and floors, set my tile and my elderly mother has her indoor waterpark..
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:16 AM   #140
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


I installed a Tile Redi Shower pan 60''X33" and read forums beforehand that help me, so to answer your question I think the only way not to have flex is to place shower pan where you want it then screw down a 2x4 on the edge around the shower pan then take the pan out and mix your thin set thin and pour a bed for the pan and then set the shower pan in it and press it down so the thin set fills all voids in the back of pan. I did mind this way and have no flex at all and I'm 6'3" 285lbs. But if I had it to do over I would use something different.
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:15 AM   #141
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


I am currently remodeling the livable "attic" in my 1 1/2 story Cape Cod house and, for several reasons, needed as much height as possible so a traditional mortor bed in the shower was not a good option for me, and ended up ordering the Tile Redi Barrier free shower pan. I have since read all of this thread and others about all the challenges with installation. I have a thought on yet another installation method...

It seems like most of the issues are trying to get the pan level with a mortar bed and the gaps filled to avoid any flex. What if you filled the gaps in on the bottom of the pan with an expanding spray foam... make sure that all the gaps are filled, and then trim any that has expanded beyond the ribs of the pan. Then just use construction adhesive to glue it to the subfloor that has already been leveled.

Are there any issues with this? I am assuming that both the foam and the construction adhesive will stick to the pan.

My pan is set to arrive today, so I can see for myself if I will be installing it or returning it and looking for an alternate option. I think I can make it work though.
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Old 10-15-2012, 03:37 PM   #142
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hi Aaron

Having just successfully installed a Tile Redi pan, your idea opens up a couple concerns for me. Compression. After you get the pan in, tile it, add the weight of a human and some water I fear that foam will compress and lead to cracked tiles and loss of the slope.

Wish I had a picture of the backside of the pan, but the ribs are not that close together that you can rely on foam for providing proper support.

2nd, whats your plan for meeting up with the 1" lip on the pan? Are you going to notch down the subfloor, build up the sub and surround. Cause again any compression or movement and that front seam will be a leaker.

You can do as I did which was to back butter the entire pan with mortar filling all the cavities (except the drain area, you'll see why), then skim coat your subfloor and plop it in and level it. I'd say the weight of my 42x36 pan was about 60lbs with all the mortar in it.

I am finishing the surround tiles today and I must say my pan is not only level, it is firmly attached to the floor as I've been in it for 5 hours tiling all the walls and I have zero flexing or any hollow areas. Here's a couple pics of my progress.

Richard

Pic 1. Zero Threshold pan seam to raised subfloor, expansion joint filled with silicon, leveled and then 3 coats of red gard.
Pic 2. Dry fit of pan tile.
Pic 3. My 12x24 tiles on the surround.
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Last edited by RWPete; 10-15-2012 at 03:47 PM.
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Old 10-15-2012, 04:43 PM   #143
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Thanks for the response and sharing your experience.

It's unfortunate that these pans have that much flex in them it seems like they need to re-design this to make it more stiff on it's own.

Your method of back buttering it sounds like a good one to me. I think I'll do that. What kind of mortar did you use?

I am doing a combination of recessing the subfloor in the shower area and building up the the rest of the subfloor in the room to make it even with the lip of the tile redi pan. I was going to silicone the seam between the pan and rest of my bathroom floor and red gard the whole area as you did as well.

Plus, I will be using a glass shower door with a bottom sweep, so not much water is going to even get to that seam.

Your shower is looking great.
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Old 10-15-2012, 05:32 PM   #144
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hi Aaron

Couldn't agree more that Tile Redi needs to rethink their design. Following their install instructions I would have had to deal with a 2" lip on the pan edge.

To think that you can get that thing to settle into a mortar bed flush to the floor would take a couple sumo wrestlers standing in it.

Back buttering and a skim coat only raised my install by about 1/8".

I used quickrete mortar mix 1102 to set it (about 1/2 a bag did it)

You'll be happy to know the slope on the pan is very effective. When I flushed my plumbing install, the water never climbed up and out of the pan and I probably let 20 gallons drop in a minute or so.

I decided to install a bi-fold shower door that folds into the shower stall, that way I can have a mat on the tile floor outside so it's not a slip and slide. I got mine from Wilson Glass here in Berkeley. You have to be extremely plumb on your framing for a bi fold door though.

Good luck on your remodel, and if you have any questions please ask. I researched the hell out of zero threshold installs before I proceeded and got a lot of feedback from the pro's (which I'm not)

Also, on you're tile layout for the shower floor. Take a bright marker and mark the noticeable transitions with a line. My original floor design got scraped cause the tile was suspended over the slope lines and would have negated the built in slope. That's why I ended up doing the 45` corners and a smaller mosaic center. (smaller tiles wouldn't have that problem) And that little 1" lip on the front of the base when flush to your floor (You can see it peeking out in my floor pic) actually has a minor 2` slope and the tech at tile redi I talked to said that lip, the seam and the floor just outside the shower should be covered with a single tile. (well multiple side by side) That way you do not have a grout line right on top of that seam.

Last thing to mention. That epoxy adhesive for setting your floor and niche tiles they include is rock fricking solid when it sets. So keep a pale of warm water a sponge a scraper and some acetone on hand when you tile. Set your tiles and really try to avoid any squeeze up between seams (I flushed my tiles butt to butt, dropped them and then slid away from the adjacent tile) Before you install spacers, clean up any tile surfaces and grout lines, then get all your spacers in and tap out any lippage. Once that epoxy dries, you'll be chipping, grinding and cursing any unwanted deposit. Good note is that acetone will take off any residue your sponge wash may have left.

Okay, back to tiling!

Last edited by RWPete; 10-15-2012 at 05:36 PM.
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Old 10-17-2012, 10:35 AM   #145
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


I got the tile ready shower pan delivered to me yesterday, and I now see how much flex there is in it on it's own. It's a shame they didn't just make it solid and flat on the bottom, so that you could just level your subfloor and install it without worrying about having gaps that cause flexible spots.

One interesting thing is that the front lip of the barrier free pan is only 1". The diagram I downloaded states that it's 1.75". This is actually a good thing as it means less is involved in keeping the bathroom floor and the edge of the shower pan at the same height.

Now I need to run my plumbing. I am hopeful, but nervous that a 2" trap will fit within space of my 2x8 joists. I am running parallel with the joists, so there wont be any notching, but there's not a ton of space for plumbing in that shallow of a cavity.
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:51 PM   #146
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hi - I've set my 37" x 72" Tile-Redi pan using a thin-set mortar and it is very solid. I noticed someone a few posts up accidentally had their contractor set the tile on the pan with thinset. If you are still reading this forum, are your tiles starting to lift?

I plan on using the supplied epoxy for the base of the plan but am curious if I can use mortar for the "wall" of the pan? I"m using 4"x16" tile and as the wall is approximately 6" I would have a full tile on the wall of the pan and then the next tile would be partly on the redi-tile pan and partly on the bathroom wall.

I also purchased a Redi-Tile niche and this product is much smoother than the pan so I will likely use the epoxy on the niche.

Any opinions/thoughts on using thinset on the pan wall?

P.S. I looked at a smaller pan that was returned at our local Home Depot and the material of it seemed different than the material of my 37"x72" pan.
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Old 10-28-2012, 01:03 AM   #147
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Hi Myers

I'm all finished with my tile redi install and as I said in prior posts it was much more difficult than tile redi leaves you to believe. Giving that and a successful install here's some tips.

1. I set 12x24 tiles on the wall and used Latapoxy (the stuff they include) on the portion of the tile that was on the pan wall and thin set on the other half. I read in the John Bridge tiling forum that thin set doesn't stick to well to the material the pan is made out of. Plus the Latapoxy has a greater bond strength than thin set and also adds to the structural integrity of the pan. (Take for instance my dried tub of leftover latapoxy. I can barely chip it with a knife, I can bend the container to a 45` angle and it won't break or crack)

So I would recommend you stick with the latapoxy on that portion of the pan.

2. Now the bad. Are you tiling yourself or contracting it out?
If hiring it out, make sure your tile person has worked with Latapoxy 300 before, if not............

a. I can't stress enough what a pain in the ass the latapoxy is to work with. For tiling the pan, have everything cut and ready to go, there is no 2nd chance with this stuff. The slippage sucks when wet. Even tiles on the minor slope to the drain will slide towards it. So use plenty of spacers, but don't let them set into the latapoxy.

b.When tiling the niche, get yourself braces to hold every angle of every tile in place while it sets or it will slide right out of place. The latapoxy will drip, regardless of thickness, it drips when vertical.

c. Work very, very, very clean. Cover anything in your work space you do not want the latapoxy on. A dried blob of unwanted latapoxy on one of your tiles will require a chisel, some acetone, a scrubbing pad and about 10 minutes to remove ( I kid you not)

d. Thoroughly clean all your grout lines and remove any excess within 2 hours of setting your tiles. I suggest you let it partially set, then come back and without putting any pressure on the tiles themselves clean any bleed through, haze and blobs. Do Not let it dry into the grout lines... Period!

e. Have the following available to clean up. Very warm soapy water, 3 sponges you can toss, mineral spirits, acetone, a nylon scrubber and some gloves. I suggest you just buy a plastic 3/8" notched trowel a disposable mixing bucket, ect. Don't use your nice tools, by the time you set your tiles, space everything, clean your work area, check your work, your tools will be a keepsake in the latapoxy museum of ruined. :-)

After a learning curve and some patients, here's what a DIYer achieved on his own.
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Old 12-30-2012, 07:37 PM   #148
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


well I'll join in on the tile redi tale of woe. I recently installed a tile redi shower pan as part of my bathroom remodel. This was on a new piece of backerboard using quikrete mortar mix 1102 as recommended by the instructions. I waited 24 hours, checked the pan, and to my horror the back right corner of the pan has significant flex. the left side of the pan seems ok though.

The bathroom is on the second floor so I have no access to the plumbing below. Also, the PVC was glued the same time we installed the pan on the mortar bed so I can't easily take the thing out to start again. As far as I can tell I have two options:

1. Use a dremel and cut the PVC from inside the drain. I would have to make sure the pipe is cut long enough to install a coupler when I try again. I would then remove the mortar bed and use one of the proven adhesives mentioned in this post and install again.

2. Drill through the shower pan and screw it to the subfloor on the right side. I would have to counter sink the screws and seal the hole with silicone. I am really leaning towards this as it is easier, but I am worried about complications with drilling through the mortar bed and maybe making solid areas worse. I am also worried about the silicone not sealing properly.

Option 1 seems the "right way" but there is no guarantee I will get it right the second time. Any advice?
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Old 01-01-2013, 12:55 PM   #149
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Tile Redi Shower pan question


well I just realized what I did wrong. I missed the capitalized statement in the sintructions that says do not step in pan until the mortar has cured.

What I did was set it into the mortar bed, and then step in it to push everything down.

I think this flexed the pan down and packed the mortar. The pan then flexed back up leaving a void. I think I'll try doing it again and just press down on the middle to attach the PVC drain and rubber mallet the sides like in the instructional video..
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Old 02-22-2013, 11:50 AM   #150
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I finally installed my Tile Redi Barrier free shower pan. I decided to go with RWPete's method of back buttering the bottom side of the pan before setting. It worked very well, and was not difficult at all. I simply filled in all the spaces on the bottom, and then spread a thin layer of thinset on my plywood subfloor, flipped it over and placed it on my pvc drain pipe, and I placed some heavy items all over the pan to keep it seated evenly.

This was a 2 person job as I had to glue the drain and set the pan all in one motion since I was working in a space that could not be accessed from below without cutting into the finished ceiling of the room below.

It has been set for 5 days now, and is super solid.

After reading about all the struggles people have had with the installation of this pan, I am convinced this is the best method. It's simple, doesn't require tons of skill, and results is no flex in the pan. I know this is different from the companies installation instructions, but I can't see how there is any down side.

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