DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Kitchen & Bath Remodeling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f80/)
-   -   At the risk of being flamed...tub leveling alternative. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f80/risk-being-flamed-tub-leveling-alternative-168292/)

mgh-pa 01-05-2013 09:20 AM

At the risk of being flamed...tub leveling alternative.
 
I'm going to be starting my bathroom remodel here shortly, and while I haven't purchased the tub/surround, I know what make/model I'm using here.

Reading the installation instructions, they are a manufacturer who actually does recommend setting the tub in a bed of mortar mixture for leveling. I have no problem this this, other than mess and the tight space I'm going to be working with, so here's my question.

While it's not mentioned in the manufacturers recommendations, can non-expandable spray foam be used as a leveler? I couldn't find much on the topic other than the recommendation of NOT to use the expanding foam for obvious reasons. My main concern, aside from it not being listed in the manufacturer's recommendation, is the fact that I don't believe foam is a load bearing/support product, correct?

Secondly, the manufacturer mentions using a felt pad if provided in place of the mortar bed. What is this? I've never heard use of a felt pad for a leveler.

Again, feel free to slap some sense into me here if necessary. :thumbup:

ddawg16 01-05-2013 10:25 AM

Good question.....I don't know if I have the answer....but.....I used the foam on our fiberglass tub when I installed it.

Since the tub is above floor level, I made a platform that followed the slope of the tub. There is about 1" between it and the tub. I then used the spray foam......expanding spray foam. The next morning the tub was sitting about 2" above the frame.....ooopppsss...

So...I cut out the foam (pretty quick just using a hand saw)...cleaned everthing up...tried it again...used less foam and this time I filled the tub about half way with water. I came out right this time.

Now....with that said....is that the best way? I don't know. I'm interested to hear input from the experts. Joecaption? OhMike? Jaz? I'll be doing my wife's new bathtub in about a month or so....

But I will point out that it's been about 8 years now since we did it....I don't see any flex in the bottom....nice thing about the foam...it's 'warm'...and quiet.....as when the kids drop toys in the tub.....

joecaption 01-05-2013 10:35 AM

I would not do it, for one if it ws such a good idea why would the manufacture not suggest it, as you mentioned it's compressable so a void may form, taking the risk of it lifting as it cures, expecive if you bought enough cans to completly fill the area. I'm sure there's more.

I try to buy a better quality tub or shower that's sellf supporting or come with a foam block that the whole thing sits on that's preformed.

mgh-pa 01-05-2013 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1086733)
I would not do it, for one if it ws such a good idea why would the manufacture not suggest it, as you mentioned it's compressable so a void may form, taking the risk of it lifting as it cures, expecive if you bought enough cans to completly fill the area. I'm sure there's more.

I try to buy a better quality tub or shower that's sellf supporting or come with a foam block that the whole thing sits on that's preformed.

Any recommendations on a tub/shower that would meet those requirements?

troubleseeker 01-05-2013 06:09 PM

Use the mortar, mixed to a consistency so that the weight of the tub can squeeze it flat as it settles in. You don't say what material the tub is, but this bed is to provide a solid, flex free support for the bottom of the tub, especially important for fiberglass , acrylic, or light weight steel tubs.

carpdad 01-05-2013 07:16 PM

Foam degrades as time passes.

paintdrying 01-05-2013 07:32 PM

I knew a plumber that would use drywall compound under everything. I would just use the mortar mix and be done with it.

oh'mike 01-05-2013 10:20 PM

Masons mix--right on the plywood floor---set the tub --wiggle it until into position secure the flange to the framing and leave it alone until set.

Do NOT step into the tub to set it--you might over do it--causing a hollow under the tub---

Gypcrete also works

COLDIRON 01-06-2013 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carpdad (Post 1087066)
Foam degrades as time passes.

"Not if its kept from sunlight"

COLDIRON 01-06-2013 08:22 AM

I used expanding foam under my shower about 10 years ago no problem.

Now if I was going to install a bathtub I would probably use non shrink grout, or foam. Non shrink grout is what it says, once it sets that's it no shrinkage.

troubleseeker 01-06-2013 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paintdrying (Post 1087079)
I knew a plumber that would use drywall compound under everything. I would just use the mortar mix and be done with it.

I don't have much faith in the mud, but it is actually the recommended base in the instructions of a few acrylic tub manufacturers. Maybe there is a concern about the corrossiveness of cement based product? I still use the morter.

BigJim 01-06-2013 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1087188)
Masons mix--right on the plywood floor---set the tub --wiggle it until into position secure the flange to the framing and leave it alone until set.

Do NOT step into the tub to set it--you might over do it--causing a hollow under the tub---

Gypcrete also works

What is Gypcrete? Which would be best, the Gypcrete or Mason's Mix?

rossfingal 01-06-2013 04:53 PM

gyp-crete (flo-crete) -
something like "floor leveler".

I'd use mortar.

"RF"

oh'mike 01-06-2013 05:19 PM

Ross is right----you would use Gypcrete only if you had a bag on the job for something else---

Otherwise masons mortar is the best choice

mgh-pa 01-08-2013 12:00 PM

Thanks, guys. I appreciate it. I will go with the mortar mix. No reason to take unneeded risks.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:45 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved