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-   -   Re-caulking Shower Enclosure (http://www.diychatroom.com/f80/re-caulking-shower-enclosure-128813/)

snpperhd 01-04-2012 06:02 PM

Re-caulking Shower Enclosure
 
Hello all...I am a new member with limited (almost none), experience performing caulk/grout repair.
I was led to DIY Chatroom via a reply of a Nestor Kelebay to a post titled "Recaulking at previously silicone-caulked shower door frame".
I am re-caulking a shower enclosure which had previously used 100% silicone caulking. Nestor's advice seems logical, but upon perusing DIY chatroom, I have learned that there may be an issue with some of his advice.
With this in mind, does anyone agree with his caulking advice (as found in the aforementioned thread)...or is it suspect, as with his other posts?
Thanks for your assistance.

TK Ham
snpperhd

Bud Cline 01-04-2012 06:05 PM

Everything Kelebay does is suspect.

Don't care to read his long-winded comments so why don't we just start anew?

What's the problem?

joecaption 01-04-2012 06:16 PM

Nesters pretty much moved to DIY.net.
His last novel was 4 post and over 30 paragraphs long to tell someone how to hook up one 220 volt outlet. I now know how to make copper wire, the history of eletricty from Tesla on, how a power station works ect. but still do not know how to hook up 3 wires.
Clean off all old silicone, wipe down with rubbing alcohol, apply 100% silicone, let sit 24 hours.

snpperhd 01-04-2012 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline
Everything Kelebay does is suspect.

Don't care to read his long-winded comments so why don't we just start anew?

What's the problem?

Well, the problem is I have had to re-caulk this shower enclosure twice within the last six months. I can see caulk lifting where water hits it direcly, which has led to a leak which is 'apparently' rolling over the shower enclosures lip onto the wood (second floor shower). I have an older enclosure (1991) which does not return any water caught on the lip, back into the drain. The water seepage seems minor, but I worry about long term damage.
I understand that it is imperative that I get the old caulk completely removed, but my main question is what is the BEST caulk to use and of course, any installation tips you may share. Thanks.

snpperhd

joecaption 01-04-2012 06:21 PM

Any chance of a picture. Most enclosers are made (if it's installed correctly) so even if water got in at the bottom, the lip on the pan would not allow it to leak.
The pan should have a lip at the top that goes up the wall at least 1".

Bud Cline 01-04-2012 06:24 PM

Here's a Reader's Digest version of what is happening:

Tile grout is not waterproof. Over time water will find its way into the grout and in turn into and through the adhesive and gravity will take it down to the lower junctures.

When you remove grout to re-grout you must be sure that deep inside the crevice it is totally dry. I mean totally dry. Use a fan and let it sit for a day or two. Only then will the new caulk take to the surfaces.

Squeeze (force) as much caulk as possible into the crevice so that it is contacting all interior surfaces. Then tool the caulk.

I always use and recommend latex caulk or siliconized caulk. Never 100% silicone caulk but a lot of guys use it.

Siliconized or latex caulk is easy to work with, you can tool and dress it, and in the early minutes of the application it is water soluble to make cleaning easier.

snpperhd 01-04-2012 06:50 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption
Any chance of a picture. Most enclosers are made (if it's installed correctly) so even if water got in at the bottom, the lip on the pan would not allow it to leak.
The pan should have a lip at the top that goes up the wall at least 1".

Here you go...although not sure it will help.
The exposed part is where it runs onto the wood.
A little heads up...through some testing, I determined that the bench you see on the left side of the pics, does NOT cause the leak. Water standing on top does not leak. When I sprayed water directly to the lower part (pan caulk line), I would get the leak approximately 3 minutes later.

snpperhd

Bud Cline 01-04-2012 06:53 PM

Pictures don't change anything in this case.


When you remove grout to re-grout you must be sure that deep inside the crevice it is totally dry. I mean totally dry. Use a fan and let it sit for a day or two. Only then will the new caulk take to the surfaces.

Squeeze (force) as much caulk as possible into the crevice so that it is contacting all interior surfaces. Then tool the caulk.

snpperhd 01-04-2012 06:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline
Here's a Reader's Digest version of what is happening:

Tile grout is not waterproof. Over time water will find its way into the grout and in turn into and through the adhesive and gravity will take it down to the lower junctures.

When you remove grout to re-grout you must be sure that deep inside the crevice it is totally dry. I mean totally dry. Use a fan and let it sit for a day or two. Only then will the new caulk take to the surfaces.

Squeeze (force) as much caulk as possible into the crevice so that it is contacting all interior surfaces. Then tool the caulk.

I always use and recommend latex caulk or siliconized caulk. Never 100% silicone caulk but a lot of guys use it.

Siliconized or latex caulk is easy to work with, you can tool and dress it, and in the early minutes of the application it is water soluble to make cleaning easier.

Thanks Bud...once I complete the caulk removal, I will ensure it is dry.
As for the caulk, you mention siliconized caulk, any name brand come to mind?

snpperhd

Bud Cline 01-04-2012 06:55 PM

All home centers sell siliconized and latex caulk. Different store different brand.

snpperhd 01-04-2012 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline
All home centers sell siliconized and latex caulk. Different store different brand.

Thanks.

CharisB 01-06-2012 11:55 AM

To remove the caulk...
 
You might consider using a silicone caulk remover, then clean the joint w/ denatured alcohol when you're done. We've tested one called McKanica Silicone Caulk remover and know it works well. Not our product, but one we really like. It will help remove all those silicone molecules that can interfere w/ the adhesion of any new product you put on. Silicone won't stick to itself, so that may be part of the issue you're seeing.

And I would recommend staying away from silicone. It's doesn't have any elasticity to it, which means it fails more quickly. Use a latex or a co-polymer rubber. I'll leave the opinions about brand names to others. I'm biased.... :whistling2:

Hope that helps.

-- Charis w/ Sashco - www.sashco.com - cbabcock@sashco.com

snpperhd 01-11-2012 12:22 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Well, I have unfortunate news regarding my re-caulk job...after 2 days it is pulling away.

Let me begin by saying I believe I followed all measures given to me to ensure a good job. I ensured the old silicone was COMPLETELY removed, through the use of Razor Blades, Silicone-Be-Gone & Mineral Spirits. I waited 3 days after cleaning the area to ensure it was dry. Then after applying the siliconized caulk (DAP Silicone Plus Kitchen & Bath), I waited another 4 days prior to first use.

The first use went fine. I noticed a problem on the second day shower, it started to pull away from the tile where the shower spray hits the bottom tiles (photos attached).

I wonder if maybe I REALLY need to ensure the area behind the tiles are dry by using a blower or something & probably should use 100% silicone this time.

Ideas/comments?

CharisB 01-11-2012 12:35 PM

Something on the tiles...
 
A couple thoughts:
1) I wonder if the tile itself has something on it. Have you tried cleaning the tile, along w/ the joint, then lightly scuffing the joint with a 220 sandpaper? That might help w/ adhesion.

2) Weigh down the pan w/ some heavy books or weights while applying the caulk and for the first 2 days after you're done, while it's curing. This will ensure the joint is at its widest (or at least close to it) and the caulk won't get stressed when someone finally steps in the shower for the first time.

If you want, email me directly. Maybe we can put our minds together to figure out what the issue is so you can get this recaulked, once and for forever!

-- Charis w/ Sashco - www.sashco.com - cbabcock@sashco.com

Tatertot 01-18-2012 11:21 AM

Some pans, shower enclosures, and title require specific caulk. Just a thought. I found this because I am doing the same project. I found a lot of professionals suggest ge silicone ii. It will be a few days before I caulk still reading tips.


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