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-   -   Kitchen Remodel : Underlayment questions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f80/kitchen-remodel-underlayment-questions-189146/)

Alan 10-23-2013 10:14 PM

Kitchen Remodel : Underlayment questions
 
So here I am nearing completion of phase one of my kitchen remodel most of the drywall on one half is done, and cabinets are slated to be delivered within 8 weeks. One of the things on my agenda is to tear out the old swollen underlayment and replace it.

When I do this, do I need to put some type of barrier between the underlayment and the subfloor to prevent any moisture from the crawlspace from soaking into the underlayment and causing it to swell, or will this not be an issue? ( I live in a very wet area : Pacific Northwest )

Second, after the cabinets arrive, I need to install half of them in order for the kitchen to be functional until the other half of the room is completed. I won't be able to get the floor in (vinyl/linoleum) until all of the cabinets are in, so this leaves me with the predicament of how to protect the floor for a few months until the rest of the room is ready. Can I simply paint it? Do I need paint, or will a coat of primer do the job?

Any other pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

oh'mike 10-24-2013 05:37 AM

Alan---how good is the subfloor? If it is in good shape---smooth,flat and reasonably tight gaps---I suggest you don't put down your 1/4" underlayment until you are ready to lay the sheet goods.

If you are concerned about keeping the cabinets at the same height as the finished floor---place underlayment under the cabinet run---extending about 6 inches past the toe kick of the cabinets----

Dirty underlayment --or underlayment covered with paint is not good----

If you do choose to install the underlayment before the cabinets arrive---cover it with pink rosin paper-----

I'm not sure what to say about the humid basement/crawl under the floor----

joecaption 10-24-2013 07:41 AM

The vapor barrier needs to be on the ground in the crawl space to stop rising moisture.
If it's really that moist under there it's time to take a look as to why.
Working gutters with lines leading away from the foundation.
Grade running away from the foundation.
No mulch piled up against it.
No flower beds forming ponds.

Alan 10-24-2013 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1257446)
The vapor barrier needs to be on the ground in the crawl space to stop rising moisture.
If it's really that moist under there it's time to take a look as to why.
Working gutters with lines leading away from the foundation.
Grade running away from the foundation.
No mulch piled up against it.
No flower beds forming ponds.

Right. I don't even think it's an issue, but I didn't know if it's common practice, similar to putting paper under wood flooring. My crawlspace is actually very dry.

Mike : That sounds like a plan. 30" strips along the edge where the cabinets go will do the trick I think. My subfloor is 2x6 T&G, but i'm not really sure what condition it is until I tear the old underlayment up. I kind of like having the old linoleum there for now, it makes cleanup real easy. :)

What about painting or sealing underneath where the cabinets will be?

oh'mike 10-24-2013 05:17 PM

Good underlayment is water resistant---so painting or sealing is not needed---

if the subfloor does not have a layer of plywood on top--you might consider using something thicker than the typical 1/4" Multi-Ply----perhaps 1/2" BC exposure 1---

Rusty Baker is the most knowledgeable sheet installer that I know---PM him and ask if he will add his knowledge to this thread---Mike-----

Alan 10-24-2013 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1257624)
Good underlayment is water resistant---so painting or sealing is not needed---

if the subfloor does not have a layer of plywood on top--you might consider using something thicker than the typical 1/4" Multi-Ply----perhaps 1/2" BC exposure 1---

Rusty Baker is the most knowledgeable sheet installer that I know---PM him and ask if he will add his knowledge to this thread---Mike-----

Water resistant... now that I didn't know. Seems like around here everyone uses mdf or particleboard. :huh:

As far as thickness goes, i was just kind of planning on replacing it with something the same thickness. I'll PM Rusty. Thanks again Mike. :)

rusty baker 10-25-2013 08:09 AM

Use only underlayment grade plywood. And you need a vapor barrier under the house. Everything seems to have been covered by the other posters. What is the subfloor and how thick?

Alan 10-25-2013 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rusty baker (Post 1257868)
Use only underlayment grade plywood. And you need a vapor barrier under the house. Everything seems to have been covered by the other posters. What is the subfloor and how thick?

Hi rusty, thanks for chiming in. Subfloor is 2x6 t&g. When I ask the lumber yard for underlayment, what exactly do I ask for? If I say underlayment grade plywood they should know what I mean? Does it seem like an ok plan to you to just cut pieces for under the cabinets for now until the floor is ready to go down?

rusty baker 10-25-2013 11:09 PM

Just ask for underlayment grade plywood, no luan. Yes pieces under the cabinet should be fine, but that means you will have to cut the flooring around the cabinets. For sheet vinyl, putting it under the cabinets is best if possible, but most of what I have installed over the last 40 years has been cut around them.

Gary in WA 10-26-2013 03:57 PM

Just to back-up what has been said and give you a visual, use "underlayment" grades listed: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...KEftFQ&cad=rja
As they have a perm rating of 0.7 to stop the moisture coming from below before it gets to the sheet goods; http://www.cbs.state.or.us/bcd/progr.../ResPub_14.pdf

Otherwise (with interior plywood= 1.9p) moisture will travel through the wood subfloor, then plywood, then stop at the vinyl; Photo4;http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...n-crawlspaces/

I used red rosin paper once to protect a wood strip floor- removed/replaced after worker walked in with wet boots- it leaked/stained but cleaned it up fast; never again.

Gary


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