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Old 01-22-2012, 08:25 PM   #16
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70's Bathroom remodel


have a diamond blade- got one on a $10 circ saw from a pawn shop- pawn guy didn't know the blade was worth more than the saw.

I've mounted it in my radial arm saw before to cut granite tiles.

Thanks for the link.

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Old 01-25-2012, 02:40 PM   #17
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70's Bathroom remodel


I've spent some time researching channel drains - the contractortalk site seems to be a bit difficult for me to search - the good information must be buried in thousands of useless (to DIY'ers) threads about terrible ehow advice and upcoming training seminars etc. I've had much better luck actually reading the installation instructions from several different linear drain manufacturers.

From what I understand the majority of these installs use a modified divot method where the 'divot' would actually stretch the entire width of the linear drain. Then the clamping drain is installed at the bottom of the 'divot-trench' I'll call it. I've not seen any top down drawings- only cutaway side view drawings, but I can see how this seems to work. I would assume the bottom of the 'divot-trench' would need to slope from the sides toward the clamp drain flange in addition to the slope that creates the shower floor leading into the linear drain. Then the whole thing painted in hydroban. I've seen some recommend the bathroom floor be backsloped toward the drain for 3 to 6 inches and I've seen others say just to leave it flat. They all say to extend waterproofing various lengths into the bathroom, one even suggested the entire bathroom floor and up 4" on all walls - don't think I'll be doing that.

While researching it, I came across this unique solution: http://www.whatadrain.com/index.html I had to read the entire site to understand, but there is no part of the drain that is visible from the floor. The drain is created by leaving a 1/8 to 3/16 gap between tiles which lay over the top of the drain trough. The trench drain itself is directly plumbed into the ptrap using a PVC slip to male thread adaptor. For the tiles which hang over the edge of the trench, they are supported by a piece of SS that stretches across the entire length of the drain. the waterproofing goes right up to and over the trough lip. It looks very simple. Has anyone seen it or used it before? Any reason why I shouldn't try it? The biggest concern I have is for a curbless shower, does a single 3/16" gap the width of the door provide enough drainage to protect the bathroom floor?

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