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-   -   what is the thing called that stores water under pressure for low water pressure? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/what-thing-called-stores-water-under-pressure-low-water-pressure-78169/)

oregongirl23 08-07-2010 04:47 PM

Water Pressure Tanks for low water pressure situations - do they work?
 
OK - now that I know what I'm looking for... a "Water Pressure Tank" such as the Lowe's "WellSaver" line...

I am trying to remedy a low water pressure situation in a 100-year-old house with a 100-year-old galvanized main water line. I've gotten two quotes to replace it - both around $2k. But after talking to a couple neighbors with identical houses who had it done and it made barely any difference in their water pressure, I've decided that it's too expensive.

Someone told me about this "quick fix" water pressure tank installation. He said I could put it in my basement right where the water comes in. Do they really work? If so, how big of one do you think I would need for a one-story house that is just under 1000 square feet with one bathroom? The water comes in at the basement and has to go up to the main level.

Thank you so much in advance everyone for your input!

Alan 08-07-2010 05:03 PM

It doesn't really create artificial water pressure, if that's what you're getting it for.

It stores water under pressure so that your pump isn't constantly working.

Describe your situation and explain why you think you need 'artificial water pressure' and someone can recommend a solution for you.

LateralConcepts 08-07-2010 06:41 PM

Are you on a well or city water?

If you're on a well you should already have a pressure tank. Typically stores water around 60psi.

If you're on city water, there's not really any way to increase the pressure. It is what it is. There's a difference however with volume and pressure. Most likely 100 year old galvanized water line is choked down causing a problem with "volume". The only way to increase the volume is to run a new main line, up-size, and re-plumb the water lines inside as well.

oregongirl23 08-07-2010 07:58 PM

I'm on city water. My friend was telling me that this thing will store up a quantity of water and then when you need to use the water, the thing will shoot it out creating artificial pressure. So even though my main line is not letting much water through because of the buildup inside the old line, this thing will allow it to trickle in at its own pace, get stored in the tank, and then get forced out under pressure. Is that not how this thing works? Is there something else that works like this?

TheEplumber 08-07-2010 08:04 PM

The tank will never store more pressure then what the city is giving you. But a booster pump would.

Proby 08-07-2010 08:05 PM

We had a pump at my parents house growing up. We had city water and my Father installed a pump similar to a compressor, it had a tank on it that I thought was for air pressure.

When the water pressure was low for some reason, either because the neighbors were using the sprinklers or someone else in the house was taking a shower, we would turn the pump on and it would increase the pressure dramatically.

To be honest, I am not sure if this was increasing "pressure" or "volume". All I know is that it would be night and day in the shower, it would go from barely being enough pressure to get the soap off- to blasting the water out.

If we left the pump on we would hear it turn on and off occasionally, mostly when someone was using the water. It was a bit loud so we left it off unless it was needed to boost the pressure.

oregongirl23 08-07-2010 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 482033)
The tank will never store more pressure then what the city is giving you. But a booster pump would.

what is a "booster pump"? is it what Proby is talking about?

TheEplumber 08-07-2010 09:11 PM

pretty much. Google "booster pumps for home" Learn all you can and get some quotes from plumbers in your area. then you can decide if its something you want to do yourself.

oregongirl23 08-07-2010 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 482055)
pretty much. Google "booster pumps for home" Learn all you can and get some quotes from plumbers in your area. then you can decide if its something you want to do yourself.

thanks! I appreciate it everyone.

Also - if anyone has any personal experience using one of these "booster pumps" please let me know.

oregongirl23 08-07-2010 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oregongirl23 (Post 482075)
thanks! I appreciate it everyone.

Also - if anyone has any personal experience using one of these "booster pumps" please let me know.

Oh - hey - another question - I'm seeing when I Google these water pressure booster pumps that they always seem to be connected to a big blue tank as well. Do these two things need to be installed together?

TheEplumber 08-07-2010 10:46 PM

Simply put, the big blue tank is called an expansion tank. Water does not compress so when you raise your water pressure via the pump an air bladder inside the tank will compress, absorbing the added pressure.

Gary in WA 08-07-2010 11:08 PM

http://www.watts.com/pages/learnAbou...64#generalinfo

Be safe, Gary

Mr. Green 08-07-2010 11:21 PM

http://www.pumpsandtanks.com/index.htm

Give this guy a call.....he can help.:):):)

AllanJ 08-08-2010 01:18 AM

Yes, an expansion tank is needed together with a pump.

With no pump, the tank does not yield any increase in pressure.

With no tank, the pump will not work correctly (it will cycle on and off too much) and its life will be shortened.

As far as replacing the galvanized pipe and having no improvement in pressure, was the pipe replaced all the way out to the street water main?

oregongirl23 08-08-2010 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 482154)
Yes, an expansion tank is needed together with a pump.

With no pump, the tank does not yield any increase in pressure.

With no tank, the pump will not work correctly (it will cycle on and off too much) and its life will be shortened.

As far as replacing the galvanized pipe and having no improvement in pressure, was the pipe replaced all the way out to the street water main?

ok, that makes sense. And I'm pretty sure now that is what my friend was talking about... tanks, pumps, bladders.... ugh

Allan, the neighbor told me that they replaced their main line from curb to house and it made little to no difference in their water pressure. The area the house is in is notorious for low water pressure. But the house I own seems to be the worst. I want to rent it out but afraid the pressure is too low for any prospective renters. Basically, you can't do two things at once - if washer is filling up it takes 1/2 hour and you can't take a shower. If toilet has been flushed you can't wash your hands for 10 minutes. I bought the house from flippers and they replaced all of the inside plumbing. Of course the two contractors who came out to give me quotes on the main line said that it would solve all my problems but after talking to the neighbors I'm not convinced. $2k is an awful lot of money for me to gamble with. I was hoping this tank/pump thing would not only be a cheaper way out but also make the house livable.

****Also, thanks Mr. Green and GBR - I will check out your links after I finish my first cup of coffee :) ****


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