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-   -   What to do with toilet flange (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/what-do-toilet-flange-117276/)

BOUTYM 09-15-2011 07:14 AM

What to do with toilet flange
 
I'm remodeling two bathrooms and due to previous water damage I've had to completely remove the floor down to the joists in both (they are adjoining). The one I'm focusing on at the moment is a smaller bathroom with the toilet flange in a corner, which is going to make it difficult to get the new plywood under. Which option below is the better choice keeping in mind time and expense:

1. De-solder the existing flange, clean it up, put down the new sub-floor and solder the flange back in?

2. Whack the drain pipe below the flange, put down the floor and use a rubber coupler to reconnect the old flange?

3. Whack the drain pipe below the flange, put down the floor and use a rubber coupler to reconnect to a new PVC flange?

oh'mike 09-15-2011 07:27 AM

Post a picture if you can.

Forget the torch--

Often the ply is pieced around the hole so no plumbing is needed.

If the old drains are accessible cutting with a chain breaker and switching to PVC is the way to go.

Need more info.--Mike---

BOUTYM 09-15-2011 07:56 AM

I think it's going to be chore to get the plywood under this given the close proximity to the walls. I really don't want to have to piece it together because I'll have to do some framing under it to support the pieces. I'm thinking cutting off the flange and coupling to the existing or a new flange would be much easier.

http://www.bestweb.net/%7Ejr/image/DSCN0366.JPG

Alan 09-15-2011 10:08 AM

You might want to check the hardware stores before you go chopping it.

Around here we don't have ANYTHING at the hardware stores available for copper drainage. :no:

Bud Cline 09-15-2011 11:13 AM

Set two blocks from joist to joist on either side of the pipe then cut your subfloor material so as to have the seam split one of the blocks.

Don't go desoldering any of that assembly. It won't be that easy to re-install.

If it ain't broke don't fix it.:yes:

oh'mike 09-15-2011 07:59 PM

Bud has the simplest plan---you didn't mention that the drain was copper--Parts are expensive and not available at retail stores.

BOUTYM 09-21-2011 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 728716)
Set two blocks from joist to joist on either side of the pipe then cut your subfloor material so as to have the seam split one of the blocks.

Don't go desoldering any of that assembly. It won't be that easy to re-install.

If it ain't broke don't fix it.:yes:

You were right. Shoring up around the bottom of the flange and piecing it on top was WAY easier than cutting and trying to reattach would have been. Just cutting it would have been a real PITA since I don't have a cutter big enough to do a decent job and I don't have an often enough need to spend big bucks on one. Couldn't really split the seam on one of the blocks due to space restrictions, but came up with another way to configure the blocks to support everything.

Actually, there wasn't much piecing together. I just cut a U in once piece of plywood and slipped it under and cut the next layer 90 degrees to the first one and slipped it under, filling in the cutouts with the pieces cut out from each layer. Came out so nicely that you have to look straight down on it to see that it's not a single uncut sheet.

BOUTYM 09-21-2011 09:17 PM

BTW... note to anyone out there paying attention that doesn't already know...

Do yourself a HUGE favor if you're in the market for a jigsaw. About 3 years ago I stopped buying cheap power tools and started laying out the extra cash for Milwaukee and Rigid. My grandfather and father always had Milwaukee tools and I never could understand the need to spend the money on this level of quality unless you were a contractor (which they both were). The difference between the quality tools and the Ryobi and such is like night and day!!! Even if you don't use them much, you'll marvel at how much easier the job is with a high quality tool.

I broke down a while back and bought a top of the line Rigid jigsaw and I'm here to tell you that this thing is so pleasurable to use that you want to go out and find stuff to cut with it. Cutting with this jigsaw is like nothing you've ever experienced if you've spent your life using B&D, Ryobi and other assorted crap out there. I've had all of them and never again will I spend a dime on crap tools.


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