Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-22-2010, 11:53 AM   #16
fabrk8r
 
fabrk8r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 849
Share |
Default

What is this that came out of my supply line???


Here's my theory...it wouldn't have to get near a faucet. Once it broke free of the check-valve housing it would have been pushed to the next place in the water line that was small enough to capture it. Then it would have sat there, decreasing the pressure until a back-flow pushed it loose and allowed the pressure to get back to normal. Eventually it would get lodged in another place, restricting the flow again.

I doubt it was actually restricting the cold water itself, but it may have occasionally knocked sediment loose in the hot water pipe, which could have plugged the aerators on the faucets.

__________________
"The physician can bury his mistakes, but the architect can only advise his clients to plant vines." -- Frank Lloyd Wright
fabrk8r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2010, 11:54 AM   #17
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5
Default

What is this that came out of my supply line???


Quote:
Originally Posted by fabrk8r View Post
I think whoever suggested a water heater check valve is correct.


This is an example...not an exact match, but very similar. How old is your water heater?

Water heater is 2005 (same age as the house). CPVC throuout.
original is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2010, 12:02 PM   #18
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5
Default

What is this that came out of my supply line???


Quote:
Originally Posted by fabrk8r View Post
Here's my theory...it wouldn't have to get near a faucet. Once it broke free of the check-valve housing it would have been pushed to the next place in the water line that was small enough to capture it. Then it would have sat there, decreasing the pressure until a back-flow pushed it loose and allowed the pressure to get back to normal. Eventually it would get lodged in another place, restricting the flow again.

I doubt it was actually restricting the cold water itself, but it may have occasionally knocked sediment loose in the hot water pipe, which could have plugged the aerators on the faucets.
I think you are exactly right! With the exception that it did not knock any sediment loose. It was blocking the intake to the hot water heater on the cold side. At one point it was lodged in the ball valve and I could not turn it to the closed position. I can see little check marks in the stem of the plastic piece where I was trying to close the valve. After it moved back up the pipe (back pressure releived) I was able to close the valve.

Oh, it was definitely on the upper floors of my house (far from the heater and incoming supply line). It was almost comical, becuase it was blocking my sink (where the 3/4 was reduced to 1/2) in the master bath (cold side only). Then I used my air compressor to blow it free. Guess what? It moved to our guest bathroom shower and toilet. So basically, it was just traveling up through the 3/4 pipe all over the house until I cut the pipe in the basement and blew then thing out.
original is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2010, 12:03 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 608
Default

What is this that came out of my supply line???


Quote:
Originally Posted by fabrk8r View Post
I think whoever suggested a water heater check valve is correct.



This is an example...not an exact match, but very similar. How old is your water heater?
Based on the notion that the part in question is similar to this (i.e. part of a check valve) here's my theory that fits with what the OP stated happened...

The water heater had a check valve, but it was faulty, stuck in a partially open mode, therefore hot water did flow, but at a reduced pressure. Eventually, the check valve completely failed and the spring that should be holding the valve against the gate on the cold water side instead fired the valve backward into the cold water lines, likely when there was a drop in the pressure differential accross the check valve when cold water started running. This piece of the valve got caught up in the cold water flow and began lowering the water pressure to a faucet when it tried to transision to a 1/2" line. This "peg" has a density close to that of water, so it was easy for it to move around when ever the water wasn't on pushing it in a particular direction, hence the reason the problem moved from faucet to faucet.

HooKooDooKu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gray PCV for water supply line - is this OK? Jim S. Plumbing 13 08-09-2010 09:20 AM
leaky copper fitting in supply line for fire sprinkler system tina2435 Plumbing 5 09-18-2009 09:54 PM
Water supply line replacement bamaknox Plumbing 2 01-08-2009 08:51 AM
Buried Supply Line ? Bob10 Plumbing 28 06-06-2008 01:02 PM
hot pilot light supply line dlkk HVAC 1 02-24-2006 05:45 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.