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Savinmoney 10-17-2012 03:48 PM

Water pressure
 
I just bought a house in the North Georgia mountains. The house was built in 2000, so it's not that old. It was however, a foreclosure and in need of MUCH repair. Pretty much everything was stripped from the house. We are on public water which is fed from a tank just up the mountain from me. My problem is that I do not have much for water pressure. Is there a way to increase pressure to the house being on a public system?

joecaption 10-17-2012 04:26 PM

And how much pressure is not much pressure. Have you put a gauge on it to see?
Is the "pressure" low everywhere or just one faucet or shower?
What size lines where run as the main lines?

Fairview 10-17-2012 04:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Savinmoney (Post 1032771)
I just bought a house in the North Georgia mountains. The house was built in 2000, so it's not that old. It was however, a foreclosure and in need of MUCH repair. Pretty much everything was stripped from the house. We are on public water which is fed from a tank just up the mountain from me. My problem is that I do not have much for water pressure. Is there a way to increase pressure to the house being on a public system?

If you google water booster pump or increase water pressure etc. you'll find numerous kinds of pumps that claim they'll solve your problem. I've never needed one so I have no first hand experience with any of them.

But since you are Savinmoney :thumbup: you might consider checking on what pressure you should have at your location before investing in something that may or may not be needed. With plumbing anything is possible and it could be a simple solution.

Savinmoney 10-17-2012 04:44 PM

Joecaption..I have not put a gauge on it. Looks like main pipe from road is about 1-2 in. but would have to look at it again to be sure. Other lines are 1/4-1/2. Not at the house right now to double check these sizes. Pressure is weak in the whole house, especially if more than one faucet is on.

joecaption 10-17-2012 04:53 PM

Main line should be a min. of 3/4, 1" is better, all main runs in the house needed to be at least 3/4" then 1/2 to the supplys.

What you think is low pressure is really low flow.

When all the faucets are shut off the pressure will be equal anyplace you check it, once the faucets opened up if the lines to small the pressure drops and flow is reduced.
Picture a garden hose with a gauge where it connect at the house and turn it on. The pressure drops, now stand on the hose, pressure goes up on the gauge but flow goes down.

Savinmoney 10-17-2012 05:00 PM

Joe..Thanks for the visual! makes since to me!

GBrackins 10-17-2012 05:26 PM

silly question? have you check all of the valves to make sure one of them is not partially closed? this would certainly reduce flow. if the place was foreclosed then at some time I'm sure the public utility shut off the water, maybe it did not get turned on fully.

Savinmoney 10-17-2012 05:36 PM

Gary, Not so silly of a question, but yes, all valves are wide open. Thanks

raylo32 10-17-2012 06:12 PM

Is there a pressure regulator in your system to reduce the supplied municipal pressure down to what you need in the house? If so, maybe alls you need is to adjust this. But as mentioned before you really need to put a gage on it and see what you have in the first place.


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