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Old 03-08-2011, 05:43 PM   #1
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


My water pressure is 110-120 PSI, and I believe it's causing me some plumbing problems. As far as I know there's no water pressure regulator installed currently, although I could be mistaken.

I've heard that sometimes the water company will take care of this. Anyone have any experience with getting them to do this?

Thanks!
Will

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Old 03-08-2011, 05:48 PM   #2
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


WOW! That's nuts.

Why don't you call them and see what they say? Generally that is way too much water pressure, you'll be blowing seals and fittings if your luck runs out.

How do you know what your water pressure is?

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Old 03-08-2011, 06:03 PM   #3
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


In my area, you are responsible for lowering the water pressure in your home with a regulator
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:06 PM   #4
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


If you have an ice maker I would turn off the water supply to it right now. Plastic toilet valves could be the next thing to get damaged.

Find your in bound shut off if you have one and reduce your flow until you can get it figured out.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:02 PM   #5
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


I bought a gauge and tested it, had a couple of new faucets leak, among other things, and someone recommended it.

Is decreasing the flow going to help? I heard that doesn't actually affect the pressure in the system.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:14 PM   #6
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


Quote:
Is decreasing the flow going to help? I heard that doesn't actually affect the pressure in the system.
It won't change the pressure but it will reduce the volume in the event something else goes haywire. One of these local plumbers around here will be able to help, I don't understand all that stuff.

I do know that years ago we had about forty-five pounds of pressure and when a new million gallon storage tank went on line a block away from our house it increased the pressure to eighty pounds and blew out fittings and hoses.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:15 PM   #7
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


Have you checked to see if there might be a pressure regulator at the meter? They will fail from time to time. If not I suggest installing a 1" size. A 1" will deliver more water while maintaining a safe pressure.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:22 PM   #8
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


Thanks, as best I can tell there isn't a pressure regulator at the meter. They all have that distinct bell shape, right? I looked for one with no luck.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:35 PM   #9
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


In Vancouver BC the responsibility for reducing street water pressure into the home is on the home owner. I assumed it was that way everywhere.

Our street pressure varies from 80 to 130 psi depending on the area. The pressure reducing valve is usually located close to where your piping first enters the house. Most plumbers install it right after the take off to the outside hose line to leave at least one hose with full street pressure. If you do have a pressure reducing valve it has either failed or some one has adjusted it to provide the maximum possible pressure. They usually come factory set for 49 psi but many plumbers will up that to 60 psi. The pressure spring inside weakens with age and usually allows more and more pressure with time. If this valve is over 20 years old it will sometimes start to leak after you try to adjust it. You need to adjust the one you have or get a new one. Any pressure over 75 psi will definately shorten the overall lifespan of your hot water tank as well as cause more frequent difficulties for taps and water connected appliances.
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Old 03-09-2011, 11:58 PM   #10
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


I agree it is homeowner responsibility... Though I'm in the U.S. My 1950s home had that kind of pressure when I moved in, and the iron pipes didn't mind a bit. My garden hose tho was another story! A regulator was ~$70 USD that I ordered online and installed myself. I read online towns sometimes upgrade the water supply but residents don't get the memo to install a regulator. Good luck!
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Old 03-10-2011, 01:11 AM   #11
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


Quote:
Originally Posted by WillJohnston View Post
Thanks, as best I can tell there isn't a pressure regulator at the meter. They all have that distinct bell shape, right? I looked for one with no luck.
The residential pressure regulators that I've seen had the bell shape. If you install a pressure regulator, maybe think about installing a ball valve between it and the city. Our home has a gate valve right where the city water enters our property. The gate valve is our responsibility and it leaks a bit when fully closed.

When I replaced our bad pressure regulator where the city water enters our home, I installed a ball valve just before the PR. It's so convenient to shut all of the water to the house using that ball valve instead of having to go to the front of our property, open the concrete cover and turn the gate valve off. Plus the new ball valve doesn't leak at all.

HRG
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:01 AM   #12
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Water Pressure 110-120 PSI - My problem or the water co's?


It's called a pressure reducing valve, PRV. Here's a pic of what it looks like.

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