Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-25-2012, 01:49 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


I live in Phoenix, AZ, and when the weather heats up, so does the water in our pipes. Sometimes, it can take up to 5 minutes of the water running for it to go from scalding hot to a usable temperature. The opposite happens in the winter, even with the hot water on full blast, it takes quite a while for all of the cold water to leave the pipes.

I live in an older house (built in 1961), and I was wondering if this is a problem inherent to older homes, or if there is something that can possibly be done to help control the temperature of the water a bit better. If anyone can offer insight as to why the temperature of the water is so strongly affected by the outside temperature, it would be greatly appreciated.

-Aaron

aaron_phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2012, 05:50 PM   #2
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,202
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


I assume you are on city water. If the pipe leading to your house from the street is shallow burial, the water in the pipe would heat up during the day. Then when you come home and turn the water on, you effectively need to drain the pipe before colder city water reaches the house. This would not be the case if the pipe is buried several feet, since the temperature of the soil down several feet is not typically affected by outdoor temperature, at least on a short term basis.

If my hunch is correct, you could get the pipe relaid at a deeper depth. You could insulate the pipe, which would help some. It seems unlikely the cause is in your house, unless you have a riser under a crawlspace that is subject to air heating.

Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Daniel Holzman For This Useful Post:
aaron_phoenix (06-25-2012)
Old 06-25-2012, 06:01 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Daniel,

That explanation makes sense. When I was laying out a sprinkler system in the front yard, I noticed that the pipe coming in from the street to the house was buried at approx 12 - 15" deep. What would you say is the recommended depth for this pipe and what steps do you think would need to be taken in order to make it happen (i.e. city approval, etc)?

Thanks so much for your response.
aaron_phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2012, 06:04 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
Posts: 1,549
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron_phoenix View Post
I live in Phoenix, AZ, and when the weather heats up, so does the water in our pipes. Sometimes, it can take up to 5 minutes of the water running for it to go from scalding hot to a usable temperature. The opposite happens in the winter, even with the hot water on full blast, it takes quite a while for all of the cold water to leave the pipes.

I live in an older house (built in 1961), and I was wondering if this is a problem inherent to older homes, or if there is something that can possibly be done to help control the temperature of the water a bit better. If anyone can offer insight as to why the temperature of the water is so strongly affected by the outside temperature, it would be greatly appreciated.

-Aaron

It's part of the price you pay for living in a warm climate, although yours is downright hot in the summer,ours gets luke warm and stays that way all summer,but at least bearable.
Canarywood1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2012, 11:02 PM   #5
moderator
 
TheEplumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,868
Rewards Points: 8
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by Canarywood1 View Post
It's part of the price you pay for living in a warm climate, although yours is downright hot in the summer,ours gets luke warm and stays that way all summer,but at least bearable.
mine's 5ft deep. Ice cold year around. But then, so is our lake water
__________________
VOTE NOW!
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
TheEplumber is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 04:59 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW burbs of Chi-town
Posts: 87
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


My mom and sister live in Mesa and have the same issue with their water.
I presumed it's because their pipes aren't buried very deep because of the climate.
Doorman54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 01:30 PM   #7
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 781
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron_phoenix View Post
Daniel,

That explanation makes sense. When I was laying out a sprinkler system in the front yard, I noticed that the pipe coming in from the street to the house was buried at approx 12 - 15" deep. What would you say is the recommended depth for this pipe and what steps do you think would need to be taken in order to make it happen (i.e. city approval, etc)?

Thanks so much for your response.
Aaron,

Maybe try a test. On a day when the cold water is hot, dig a couple of holes where your water line runs. See how far down you have to go to feel cool soil. No thermometer needed as you're just trying to see how deep you have to go to reach soil that you want the temperature of your cold water to be.

That should tell you how deep you need to bury the cold water input line. I'm assuming it never freezes in your location. If it does freeze, you need to be a minimum of 6" below the frost line.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 06-26-2012 at 01:36 PM.
Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 03:57 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
Posts: 1,549
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEplumber View Post
mine's 5ft deep. Ice cold year around. But then, so is our lake water


But your winter weather is like your water.
Canarywood1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 05:25 PM   #9
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,202
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


In frozen Massachusetts where I live, water lines are typically buried a minimum of four feet, to protect from frost. At four feet, the temperature of the soil is essentially constant year round. Likely the same in your area, at four feet depth there will be minimal variation in soil temperature year round. Of course, you do not need to bury the line four feet to protect against frost, and the deeper you bury, the more expensive the installation, hence the shallow burial creating your temperature issue.

You would need to contact the city where you live to get the requirements for deeper burial of the pipe, in a lot of communities you can put in in any depth you want on your property, but you need to get the city to make the connection to their system in the street. Only your local water department can tell you how it is done in your area.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 02:14 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 221
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron_phoenix View Post
I live in Phoenix, AZ, and when the weather heats up, so does the water in our pipes. Sometimes, it can take up to 5 minutes of the water running for it to go from scalding hot to a usable temperature. The opposite happens in the winter, even with the hot water on full blast, it takes quite a while for all of the cold water to leave the pipes.

I live in an older house (built in 1961), and I was wondering if this is a problem inherent to older homes, or if there is something that can possibly be done to help control the temperature of the water a bit better. If anyone can offer insight as to why the temperature of the water is so strongly affected by the outside temperature, it would be greatly appreciated.

-Aaron
Is the yard over the pipe gravel or grass?
Do you have irrigation?
Are any of the pipes in th attic?
goosebarry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2012, 10:38 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron_phoenix View Post
it can take up to 5 minutes of the water running for it to go from scalding hot to a usable temperature. The opposite happens in the winter, even with the hot water on full blast, it takes quite a while for all of the cold water to leave the pipes.
Having your incoming water go into a tank before it serves the rest of the house may work. The outgoing water temp would be the weighted average temp of the hot and 'normal' water.

Putting some numbers on it, let's say 2 GPM for 5 minutes is 10 gals of 120F water and the normal water temp for summer is 70F.
Then, a 50 gal. tank would give you 80F water and a 30 gal tank would give you 86.7F.

A more aggressive and more expensive solution would be to use a heat exchanger.
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2012, 11:16 PM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: It's a dry heat....
Posts: 16
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Water in Pipes Strongly Affected by Outside Temperature


Quote:
Originally Posted by aaron_phoenix View Post
I live in Phoenix, AZ, and when the weather heats up, so does the water in our pipes. Sometimes, it can take up to 5 minutes of the water running for it to go from scalding hot to a usable temperature. The opposite happens in the winter, even with the hot water on full blast, it takes quite a while for all of the cold water to leave the pipes.

I live in an older house (built in 1961), and I was wondering if this is a problem inherent to older homes, or if there is something that can possibly be done to help control the temperature of the water a bit better. If anyone can offer insight as to why the temperature of the water is so strongly affected by the outside temperature, it would be greatly appreciated.

-Aaron
I too live in "it's a dry heat" Phx. My water is exactly the same way. In the summer I take showers using only the cold water setting. It is warm when it comes out of the pipes. In the winter the water heats up pretty quick - I thought it was due to the hot water heater being very close. It must be Phoenix....Oh and my home was built in 1963.


Last edited by beads4me; 07-07-2012 at 11:21 PM. Reason: Left something out
beads4me is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water heater solutions to get hot water in timely manner daluu Plumbing 22 05-07-2012 08:44 PM
Condensation amyevans Windows and Doors 6 10-21-2011 10:11 PM
In AZ, hot water from the cold water pipes maynard7 Plumbing 12 08-06-2011 01:43 PM
water borehole question joeuser General DIY Discussions 2 04-18-2010 10:33 PM
Sweating windows big daddy-o General DIY Discussions 15 01-06-2008 02:41 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.