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miguel24932 03-20-2013 07:13 PM

Water Heater Drain pan
 
Hi,

I have a 24" water heater drain pan I bought with a 1" drain connection. Any ideas where I can tie this drain into? I really don't want to just have a pvc pipe on the floor sitting over the floor drain. I have a condensate pump for my furnace next to to it but is would that be smart to tie into there?

HVACTECH96 03-20-2013 09:46 PM

run the overflow drain to a location so if you did have a leaking WH the water will be directed where no damage will be done.Where thispoint is depends on your situation.A pump would work but only if the water heater sits higher than the pump.Water doesn't go uphill.

miguel24932 03-20-2013 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HVACTECH96 (Post 1141874)
run the overflow drain to a location so if you did have a leaking WH the water will be directed where no damage will be done.Where thispoint is depends on your situation.A pump would work but only if the water heater sits higher than the pump.Water doesn't go uphill.

Yes, the pump would sit higher. Can you tie in such a small pipe to the main drain?

Red Squirrel 03-21-2013 12:03 AM

I recently ran a new drain for my furnace and added one for the humidifier, planing to eventually add a water heater pan too and tie in, basically this is what I did:

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-1578-dsc04938.JPG

Just cut a hole in the drain and fit the T fitting in it so it's snug. I ran that drain close to the furnace for this purpose though.

Actually on this subject, think a gas line would have enough play for me to lift the tank up a few inches to slide the pan under it? Been wanting to install one myself.

fetzer85 03-21-2013 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Squirrel (Post 1141953)
Actually on this subject, think a gas line would have enough play for me to lift the tank up a few inches to slide the pan under it? Been wanting to install one myself.

If you had flexible water connections on top and a flexible gas line connection I'd say yes you could probably get away with it, but I can see in the pic that you don't have the flexible gas line so (unless your gas line has vertical room to move) I don't think you could do it w/o disconnecting the gas.

TheEplumber 03-21-2013 01:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miguel24932 (Post 1141935)
Yes, the pump would sit higher. Can you tie in such a small pipe to the main drain?

No direct connection to the drain is allowed. It doesn't have a trap and will allow sewer gas into your home. You must discharge indirectly to an approved location such as a floor drain, sink or pump basin.

miguel24932 03-21-2013 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Squirrel (Post 1141953)
I recently ran a new drain for my furnace and added one for the humidifier, planing to eventually add a water heater pan too and tie in, basically this is what I did:

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-1578-dsc04938.JPG

Just cut a hole in the drain and fit the T fitting in it so it's snug. I ran that drain close to the furnace for this purpose though.

Actually on this subject, think a gas line would have enough play for me to lift the tank up a few inches to slide the pan under it? Been wanting to install one myself.

My drain pan drain is only a 1" pvc line. Can I tie a 1" line into the main drain, which is 4"?

fetzer85 03-21-2013 09:49 AM

Like E said, you can't 'tie' into your drains. It would have to be a loose fit into a drain w/ a trap, ie. floor drain, sink drain. Without seeing any pics, only other thing I can think of is elevating your water heater to a height where you can route it to your condensate pump. Would that be possible? And if so, is it worth the trouble to not have your drain line laying on the floor?

Red Squirrel 03-21-2013 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miguel24932 (Post 1142065)
My drain pan drain is only a 1" pvc line. Can I tie a 1" line into the main drain, which is 4"?

The way I did it, size does not really matter. In my case I used 3/4" but 1/2" would work too. If you click the picture you can zoom in more and all it is, it's a T with a bit of extra pipe sticking out and it's shoved into the drain, I had to cut a hole with a dremel to make it fit. It fits very tight so it wont move. This also allows the rest of the drain to be usable.

Idealy you should also have a water sensor in it's path, as the drain pan is simply a fail safe if the heater fails. You want to know that it's taking on water, if it does.

fetzer85 03-21-2013 03:15 PM

I doubt that his floor drain is sunk down like yours though. Did you do that or was it like that when you bought the house?

miguel24932 03-21-2013 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1141982)
No direct connection to the drain is allowed. It doesn't have a trap and will allow sewer gas into your home. You must discharge indirectly to an approved location such as a floor drain, sink or pump basin.

A floor drain has no trap? What do you mean discharge indirectly?

fetzer85 03-21-2013 04:18 PM

Floor drains have traps - what he's saying is you're not supposed to physically join your pan drain pipe to your actual drain pipe.

miguel24932 03-21-2013 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fetzer85 (Post 1142377)
Floor drains have traps - what he's saying is you're not supposed to physically join your pan drain pipe to your actual drain pipe.

my toilet and laundry sink tie into the main drain so why can't the hot water heater pan drain?

fetzer85 03-21-2013 06:14 PM

Your toilet and laundry sink have p traps.

If you tie your pan drain directly into your sewer drain without a trap, sewer gases will flow into your basement, which smell awful and are unhealthy.

A trap (w/ sufficient water in it) will prevent those gases from entering your house. About a year ago my wife complained that the basement in one of her work offices smelled like crap, literally. I'm certainly not a master plumber or anything but I took a look at it. This building is downtown with buildings on either side of it. There is a large (prob 12" pvc) drain traveling from a neighbors basement, through this one, and into another. There was a 1.5" pvc drain for condensate from the a/c coil above the furnace - no pump, just a straight drip directly into an open p trap and over a couple feet to the main drain line. Low and behold the trap was dry and there was a STRONG draft flowing out of the trap. Apparently the trap dried out from whenever the last time the a/c had ran. I filled it and showed my wife where it was in case it happened again. I guess what I'm saying is a trap isn't always a reliable thing to use, ie. with a water heater drain pan that will never/rarely see water.

TheEplumber 03-21-2013 06:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miguel24932 (Post 1142425)
my toilet and laundry sink tie into the main drain so why can't the hot water heater pan drain?

Maybe you need to buy a basic plumbing book to get a grasp on some of the basic concepts.
You're pan is drained by an indirect drain line-they are not trapped and as stated.
What are you doing with the T&P line on the water heater? where does it drain to?


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