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-   -   Vent stack is on other side of basement... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/vent-stack-other-side-basement-63937/)

Feretich 02-08-2010 03:51 PM

Vent stack is on other side of basement...
 
I have a basement bathroom rough in all complete. My sink and toliet are vented however there is not vent stack to attch to. When they built my house 9 years ago the plumbers put the 2 1/2" pipe on the opposite side of the basement. There is a piece coming down from the first floor (basement ceiling) and capped. It makes sense because there is a first floor bathroom near there. Never the less I have no other place to attach to the houses vent system unless I complete a 90 degree turn up and over where my basement bathroom is now with the fixture vent pipe I installed and make a run about 25 feet across the basement between two floor joists and another 90 turn up into the stub that is coming through the floor. My question / concern is can you make a slightly pitched vertical run across the basement with a vent line? Will the gas properly vent? Can I tie my ejector pump air vent into this run as well?

JDC 02-10-2010 01:33 AM

You can run your vent across the basement as long as it rises at least 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served (most likely your vanity) before it turns horizontal. Your horizontal run needs to pitch back toward the bathroom...rising as it goes across the basement to the existing vent tie in.

As far as the local vent on your ejector, check with your local building dept. Here local vents have to run out of the house by themselves.

Alan 02-10-2010 01:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 397389)
You can run your vent across the basement as long as it rises at least 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served (most likely your vanity) before it turns horizontal. Your horizontal run needs to pitch back toward the bathroom...rising as it goes across the basement to the existing vent tie in.

As far as the local vent on your ejector, check with your local building dept. Here local vents have to run out of the house by themselves.

Couldn't have said it better myself. :thumbup:

I'm not really sure what the reasoning is behind the ejector vent going out separately.

P.S. I always put grade on my vents, but we're technically allowed to have them flat. I find it easier to give it some grade than trying to make it perfectly level. Especially if you're using ABS, it's almost impossible for any length of pipe to have perfect grade unless you're strapping it to a beam every 12".

It's getting late. I'm rambling. Goodnight.

JDC 02-10-2010 01:47 AM

What I was told by the chief plumbing inspector for the state of Ohio is that tying a local vent into the venting system causes sewer gas in the pit. Well....sure it does. But my question is this..."doesnt an ejector pit smell anyway and isnt it sealed to keep the gases out of the living area?" So I'm with you, Alan. While the reasoning has been explained to me, it just doesnt make alot of sense. Oh well...

Feretich 02-11-2010 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 397389)
You can run your vent across the basement as long as it rises at least 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served (most likely your vanity) before it turns horizontal. Your horizontal run needs to pitch back toward the bathroom...rising as it goes across the basement to the existing vent tie in.

As far as the local vent on your ejector, check with your local building dept. Here local vents have to run out of the house by themselves.

So you mean where a sink would overflow (about 42" off the floor) yes? The vent runs up to the ceiling and then across at 9' off the floor so that should be fine. I believe local code in NJ is the pit must be individually vented but I will DB check. Otherewise I will pull them all together before I go up to the ceiling and across.

Alan 02-12-2010 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 397392)
What I was told by the chief plumbing inspector for the state of Ohio is that tying a local vent into the venting system causes sewer gas in the pit. Well....sure it does. But my question is this..."doesnt an ejector pit smell anyway and isnt it sealed to keep the gases out of the living area?" So I'm with you, Alan. While the reasoning has been explained to me, it just doesnt make alot of sense. Oh well...

ACTUALLY, what i've been told is that a pump and a pit should be sized together so that both the tank, and the line are pumped totally clear. Of course totally clear in this sense is a misnomer, as we all know the pump can't get quite all of it out, but supposedly enough to keep it from going septic anyway. Should be minimal gases. Besides, I thought sewer gases only travel upward. :huh:


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