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jackdiy 12-10-2012 01:28 PM

vent slightly bad slope implications
 
A 2" abs vent pipe is hardwired in a concrete slab. It was supposed to be set in a upward slope before it goes out and up. The slope ended up being at a slight downward direction before it goes out and up. Given the ever so slight downward direction some of the bad gasses would still escape just fine in the upward direction. Only it would not be a full-on 2" vent in an upward direction. What are the implications? I mean how bad is this and how bad a problem can this cause? By the way, before you answer that this is not code, the place is an illegal stand alone bathroom on a ranch. I don't care about passing some inspection. I care about bad gasses in the bathroom.

Beepster 12-10-2012 02:19 PM

Not quite sure if I follow. The vent can slope up and then slope down on its way to a vertical vent. It can't do the opposite where water could collect and sit. Any water (from condensation, etc.) has to be able to drain back to the fixture being vented.

B

jackdiy 12-10-2012 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beepster (Post 1070375)
Not quite sure if I follow. The vent can slope up and then slope down on its way to a vertical vent. It can't do the opposite where water could collect and sit. Any water (from condensation, etc.) has to be able to drain back to the fixture being vented.

That's exactly what ends up happening, water collects and sits. Not enough water to clog the vent and prevent air from getting through. 1" of a 2" abs pipe is filled with water due to the ever so gradual slope. I can remove that water one-time with a wet vac but you are correct, condensation and rain and what not might fill the pipe up again. I'm not asking if this is bad. I know it's bad. I'm asking what are the implications??? What is the worst that can happen and what is probably going to happen?

ben's plumbing 12-10-2012 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdiy (Post 1070388)
That's exactly what ends up happening, water collects and sits. Not enough water to clog the vent and prevent air from getting through. 1" of a 2" abs pipe is filled with water due to the ever so gradual slope. I can remove that water one-time with a wet vac but you are correct, condensation and rain and what not might fill the pipe up again. I'm not asking if this is bad. I know it's bad. I'm asking what are the implications??? What is the worst that can happen and what is probably going to happen?

vent will not do its job...fixtures will not drain right... vents are that they transfer air thru system.....not suppose to see water.. unless its a wet vent...but even then no standing water

jackdiy 12-10-2012 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ben's plumbing (Post 1070402)
vent will not do its job...fixtures will not drain right... vents are that they transfer air thru system.....not suppose to see water.. unless its a wet vent...but even then no standing water

This pipe was doubling as a dry vent and wet drain. I have since found a work around connection and will no longer use it as a wet drain. That's the easy part. The difficult part is to figure out if this pipe is salvageable to use as a dry vent. I can suck the standing water out with a wet vac but I'm worried that condensation and rain will bring the water back slowly over time.

jackdiy 12-10-2012 03:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdiy (Post 1070413)
This pipe was doubling as a dry vent and wet drain.

By the way it worked fine as a wet drain. The only issue was that 1" of standing water remained in the 2" abs pipe.

Beepster 12-10-2012 03:38 PM

If there is 1" of standing water, then it is no longer a 2" vent if half of the area is blocked. The vent may be 2" because of the number of fixtures it has to vent. It will maybe still properly function.

Plus you now have standing water inside the vent that could be a breeding ground for who knows what.

Can you get a picture? Maybe someone can pipe in with a solution.

B

jackdiy 12-10-2012 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beepster (Post 1070418)
Can you get a picture? Maybe someone can pipe in with a solution.

Sure. Here is how the place looks from the outside...

http://tj.jjt.partyconnect.me/construction/cottage/

Notice the slab and the vent sticking up out of the roof. The 2" abs pipe travels through the slab and then up/out through a concrete block wall.

Here's the layout from the top/down...

http://tj.jjt.partyconnect.me/constr...ge/badvent.jpg
http://tj.jjt.partyconnect.me/constr.../fixedvent.jpg

After listening to everybody's advice I am considering starting over and creating a new vent on the other side of the 8x10. This would be closer to the 4" toilet pipe and branch off of the 2" abs drain for the shower and sink. Instead of puncturing the roof it would stop at the eave. I don't want yet another hole in the roof. Then I'll just cap off the old connections to the old vent coming out of the slab and leave as is up on top. This would be like a second vent, this time done right with the proper slope.

jagans 12-10-2012 06:48 PM

Vent pipe
 
Just put a return bend where it exits the roof after you suck it out. The sewer gas is on the other side of your trap, so its not coming back into the bathroom, and sewer gas will travel over any water thats in there before the water flows out of the pipe. Dont worry so much.

rjniles 12-10-2012 08:43 PM

Why do you post the same problems under 2 different use names? Don't like the answer you get.

You have a plumbing system that needs to be corrected and you are trying to find half baked solutions.

Javiles 12-10-2012 10:08 PM

Put a draft hood on the end of the stack to keep the rain water out at least, see what problems your situation brings then deal with them.

Alan 12-10-2012 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beepster (Post 1070375)
The vent can slope up and then slope down on its way to a vertical vent. It can't do the opposite where water could collect and sit. Any water (from condensation, etc.) has to be able to drain back to the fixture being vented.

B

I don't think so. Not by any version of the UPC i've ever read anyway.

Alan 12-10-2012 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackdiy (Post 1070413)
I can suck the standing water out with a wet vac but I'm worried that condensation and rain will bring the water back slowly over time.

You are 100% correct there. Furthermore, anything that gets dropped down there by animals and/or wind (READ : Pine needles/leaves) will not be able to be flushed out by rainwater. Eventually it will clog completely.


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