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Old 11-06-2009, 01:29 PM   #1
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Vent Pipe Problem?


I have a 25-year-old three-story townhouse. A roofer, called to do a repair, came down and said my house was the only one of 17 in the community without a vent pipe going through the roof. I checked and found that the builder had run the vent pipe into my attic, which is well ventilated, but never put it through the roof to the outside.

I called a plumber, expecting him to want to extend the pipe through the roof. But he said, wait, have you had any problem in 25 years? No! The venting is obviously going through the soffits and other attic ventilators. Forget it, you don't need to go to the trouble of running the vent through the roof.

Is this guy right? Can I leave the vent terminating in the cold unfinished attic? What problem might this cause? Could it relate to slow drainage from some sinks?

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Old 11-06-2009, 02:20 PM   #2
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Leave it in the attic - No - you can't terminate the pipe inside the attic
Will it cause slow draining - No, not unless the pipe is plugged up

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Old 11-06-2009, 04:57 PM   #3
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Like Scuba dave said no it can't terminate in the attic. lets say your neighbor decides to dump some toxic stuff down his drain. The vapors could travel in the drains then up your vent and into your attic. I know this is a very unlikely thing that will happen but it does need to terminate outside. if you have a roofer out there anyways its very simple to have a plumber extend them out the roof.
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Old 11-06-2009, 05:57 PM   #4
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Vent Pipe Problem?


I'm no plumber and are codes are probably different to yours, but we have a thing called a Durgo valve(air admittance valve) which allows the vent pipe to terminate in the loft. Be interested to hear your opinion on these.
http://www.diydata.com/plumbing/air_...ance_valve.php
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:19 PM   #5
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Quote:
Originally Posted by stuart45 View Post
I'm no plumber and are codes are probably different to yours, but we have a thing called a Durgo valve(air admittance valve) which allows the vent pipe to terminate in the loft. Be interested to hear your opinion on these.
http://www.diydata.com/plumbing/air_...ance_valve.php

Good grief Charlie Brown..

So tired of put an AAV here and put an AAV there. These are machanical valves that can fail

When doing it right, just takes terminating the vent through the roof
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Old 11-06-2009, 10:03 PM   #6
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Vent Pipe Problem?


I have never seen a vent pipe terminating inside the
attic. It is obvious everyone agrees in this thread that
It should go to the roof. I do not know if toxic fumes
may enter the system and end in the attic:since traps
are designed to eliminate that problem.It is ironic that
the plumber suggested that the pipe was there for 25
years and caused no problem so leave it alone.
I think it should be extented to the roof.
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Old 11-06-2009, 10:04 PM   #7
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Quote:
Originally Posted by stuart45 View Post
I'm no plumber and are codes are probably different to yours, but we have a thing called a Durgo valve(air admittance valve) which allows the vent pipe to terminate in the loft. Be interested to hear your opinion on these.
http://www.diydata.com/plumbing/air_...ance_valve.php

here in the US You still need at least 1 vent to roof.

Last edited by plumber Jim; 11-06-2009 at 10:06 PM.
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Old 11-06-2009, 11:37 PM   #8
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Vent Pipe Problem?


THIS IS WYE YOU SHOULD ONLY HIRE A LICENSE PLUMBER TO FIX YOUR PLUMBING PROBLEMS.

HONK KONG SARS OUTBREAK DO TO PLUMBING FIXTURE'S NOT PROPERLY SEALED

http://www.scienceline.org/2006/11/1...driscoll-sars/
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Old 11-07-2009, 12:05 AM   #9
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Beginning in November 2002, the world was faced with a new infectious epidemic disease, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). SARS first surfaced in Guandong Province, China and spread from there to other parts of Asia and beyond. Both SARS patients and those exposed to them were quarantined. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), before the outbreak was over, more than 8,000 people had been diagnosed with SARS, and 774 people had died.

In May 2003, the World Health Organization published a case definition of SARS, based on what was known at that time: someone presenting after 11/1/02 with high fever (greater than 380 C/100.40F) and cough or breathing difficulty, who either had come in close contact with someone with suspected or probable SARS or had traveled to or lived in an area with recent local transmission of SARS (WHO, 5/1/03).

The symptoms listed by the Centers for Disease Control later that year included dry, non-productive cough and high fever, sometimes with chills, headache, malaise, body aches, diarrhea, with most patients developing pneumonia (CDC). SARS patients generally did not have runny noses or sore throats (Tsang). In one Chinese hospital, some patients developed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and several of those died of Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (Xiao). The disease tended to be less severe in children than in adults (Low). Persons aged 65 and over, like myself, and those with diabetes or other adverse health conditions, were more likely to die of SARS (Berger). Among those at particular risk of becoming infected appeared to be airline passengers and crews, hospital personnel, and persons living in areas with local SARS transmission.

The causative agent was eventually discovered to be a new coronavirus, and several diagnostic laboratory tests are now available (COO). The virus is known to be spread by respiratory droplets over a distance of a few feet, and airborne spread is considered to be possible (CDC). The virus is stable in urine and feces at room temperature for at least one to two days (WHO, 5/4/03) and can survive up to 48 hours on plastic surfaces (Berger). Hundreds in a Hong Kong apartment building were infected when minute fecal particles became airborne via an exhaust fan in a defective plumbing system (King; Stein, 4/18/03). Airline passengers have become ill when traveling with a person ill with SARS (Beveridge; Stein 5/20/03). More than 50 staff and patients were infected throughout three floors of a Chinese hospital served by the same air conditioning system (Zhao).
Standard medical treatments used, with varied success, included antivirals, corticosteroids, and oxygen supplementation (Berger). Some Chinese hospitals added Traditional Chinese Medicine materials and methods to the standard medical treatments to relieve symptoms and to improve "recovery of peripheral hemolyrnphatic cells." These hospitals reported lower death rates and shortened hospital stays (Lin).




As of this writing, a number of questions about SARS remain, including the following:
  • Why did some exposed persons with antibodies to the SARS virus (such as a hospital nurse) never develop symptoms of SARS? (New Scientist).
  • Can those who have had SARS relapse?
  • Do SARS antibodies protect against infection with the SARS virus?
  • Is there an animal reservoir for the SARS virus (perhaps the Chinese wild civet cat, which is known to carry a similar virus)?
  • Will SARS epidemics recur?
  • Since coronaviruses tend to mutate easily (Berger), could a new SARS epidemic occur due to a variant virus, and if so, would antibodies acquired during the first epidemic provide any protection against the new SARS virus variant?
  • Can SARS be transmitted through blood transfusions?
  • Noting that children tend to become less ill with SARS than adults, especially elderly people, and remembering my own experience of aches experienced in bone and lymphatic areas, I wonder if the SARS virus in some way contributes to mobilization of stored bodily toxins.
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Old 11-07-2009, 12:13 AM   #10
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Quote:
Originally Posted by gabriel246 View Post
I have never seen a vent pipe terminating inside the
attic. It is obvious everyone agrees in this thread that
It should go to the roof. I do not know if toxic fumes
may enter the system and end in the attic:since traps
are designed to eliminate that problem.It is ironic that
the plumber suggested that the pipe was there for 25
years and caused no problem so leave it alone.
I think it should be extented to the roof.
Traps Don't elimate that problem from your vent just your fixture. unless you have a house trap that has a trap on the entire house.
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Old 11-07-2009, 12:49 PM   #11
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Quote:
Originally Posted by gabriel246 View Post
I have never seen a vent pipe terminating inside the
attic. It is obvious everyone agrees in this thread that
It should go to the roof. I do not know if toxic fumes
may enter the system and end in the attic:since traps
are designed to eliminate that problem.It is ironic that
the plumber suggested that the pipe was there for 25
years and caused no problem so leave it alone.
I think it should be extented to the roof.

I would call your plumber a HACK.

And if that's his attitude how many other shortcuts is he doing.
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Old 11-07-2009, 01:02 PM   #12
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Vent Pipe Problem?


i doubt that he was really a plumber,i for one can't imagine any plumber telling you that BS.I would strongley recommend to go to your village hall or city hall to find which plumbing company usually pulls permits in your area,with that being said you should find a plumber that willing to solve your problem up to code

Last edited by 130 plumber; 11-07-2009 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 11-07-2009, 05:12 PM   #13
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Vent Pipe Problem?


I can see your point about a Durgo being a mechanical item which could fail and through the roof is much better. The vast majority of venting is through the roof in the UK, unless it is the older systems running up the wall outside. Looking at our Building Regs you can only use a Durgo in certain instances.
If the stub stack is connected to a ventilated discharge stack, or into a ventilated drain not subject to surcharging. It also must be in a well ventilated area.
It can be used in 4 consecutive buildings if the 5th is conventionally vented.
Out of interest is a Durgo valve ever used in certain instances in the US, or are they seen as a waste of space.
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Old 11-15-2009, 08:03 PM   #14
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Vent Pipe Problem?


"THIS IS WYE YOU SHOULD ONLY HIRE A LICENSE PLUMBER TO FIX YOUR PLUMBING PROBLEMS"

Really??? If the work is done properly and to code WHY should a licensed plumber be the only one to call? Not meaning to pick a fight here but I have seen some cob-job work by so called pro's. In big cities the union plumbers have what is akin to a racket, locking out any others. Workmanship is what really counts.
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Old 11-15-2009, 08:49 PM   #15
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Vent Pipe Problem?


Quote:
Originally Posted by plumber Jim View Post
Like Scuba dave said no it can't terminate in the attic. lets say your neighbor decides to dump some toxic stuff down his drain. The vapors could travel in the drains then up your vent and into your attic. I know this is a very unlikely thing that will happen but it does need to terminate outside. if you have a roofer out there anyways its very simple to have a plumber extend them out the roof.
You don't need a neighbor dumping toxic stuff in his drain to pollute the air in your attic (and house). What about the (foul) gases from the bathrooms in your house. I'm just wondering how the house passed inspection. (No matter what)Don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!!

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