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Old 09-16-2013, 08:39 AM   #1
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Valve identification help.


I'm assuming this is just an old shutoff valve but I can't find any similar pics on the web. I want to be sure it doesn't have some other purpose that needs a specific replacement. It looks like something you'd find on the beaches of Normandy.

It's above the water softener and a pinhole leak has developed so I need to replace it. I'm assuming it's there in case anyone ever wants to replace or repair the water softener without having to shut the water off for the whole house? Is this basically just a more serious kind of shutoff? Or is it a cap of some sort? If it's not a shutoff then I'm confused.

Can I just replace it with a ball valve?












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Old 09-16-2013, 08:49 AM   #2
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Valve identification help.


I don't see any valves; just a female adapter and a plug.
But if you have a leak somewhere... yeah, fix it.

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Old 09-16-2013, 09:11 AM   #3
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Valve identification help.


So this whole monstrosity is basically just to cap off the water because there's a tee fitting that doesn't need to be there?

Is there any conceivable reason for having that thing there?
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Old 09-16-2013, 11:36 AM   #4
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Valve identification help.


Propbably used at one time or another for something and then no longer needed so they capped it. Looks like it's up and out of the way.

Is the pinhole leak on the pipe itself or is it leaking from the plug threads? If coming from the threads, may just need to be taken apart - cleaned/retaped threads - reinstall. Use two big wrenches and some pb blaster and make sure water pressure has been relieved.

If pinhole leak is on the pipe itself or threads are all rusted out bad, then you can replace tee & plug with a straight piece of pipe and a couple couplings and be done with it. Picture is kind of dark, can't really see where the leak is coming from. Thanks.

Last edited by jmon; 09-16-2013 at 06:52 PM.
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Old 09-16-2013, 12:15 PM   #5
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Valve identification help.


The leak is coming from the bottom of the tee. There's actually another coupling just to the right outside of the pic so I can just remove the piece from the two couplings and then put in just a straight piece of pipe about a foot and a half long. I don't know if it's better to just install a new pipe or a new pipe and replace the couplings at either end? Is it better to just leave well enough alone or is it usually a rule of thumb to replace it all including the couplings I'm going to be soldering to?

Last time I did this the pipes decided for me when I was trying to dismantle the old stuff.
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Old 09-16-2013, 12:30 PM   #6
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Valve identification help.


Cut out what you need and start with new couplings and appropriate lenght of pipe.

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Old 09-16-2013, 12:39 PM   #7
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Valve identification help.


If you don't feel comfortable soldering you can also use quick repair sharkbites. No need to remove all water from pipe as with soldering. Some plumbers prefer solder over these. There kind of pricey but easy and quick.

connecting pipe using sharkbiteshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA9qRE7K2sQ

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Old 09-16-2013, 01:36 PM   #8
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Valve identification help.


I don't mind soldering. Last time I tried to do as little soldering as possible so I soldered all the couplings but used a compression valve for the shutoff. I ended up with a shut off that drips and all the couplings are find.

I just don't like having to take out too much because there's always a chance surrounding joints are going to crack.
I don't think there will be any trouble getting the water out. The pipe I'm removing is running horizontally and at one end it bends down toward the floor and the other end is a tee coupling with a pipe running straight and another going up.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:08 PM   #9
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Valve identification help.


No need to unsolder anything. Just cut out what you need with a good pipe cutter, put a new coupling on each end of pipe, add appropriate length of pipe, Prep pipe and couplings for soldering, solder it all at once, check for leaks, and be done with it. Let us know if you need anymore help. Thanks.

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Old 09-16-2013, 08:07 PM   #10
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Valve identification help.


Use what's called repair couplings. There's no hub in the middle of the coupling. I like to slide them on the repair piece and make a mark with a pencil so I know it's sitting in the right place when you go to solder.
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Old 09-17-2013, 07:56 AM   #11
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Valve identification help.


I can replace the coupling on the left side but what should I do on the right side? I was thinking I'd just heat it up and try to pull to pipe out of the tee.

The blue arrows show the piece I was hoping to take out. As you can see I've expertly repaired the leak with some rubber, silicone, Duct tape, and a clip.

Do I have to replace that tee (where the red arrow is) also? If that has to be replaced then I'll end up having to replace everything.


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Old 09-17-2013, 09:05 AM   #12
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Valve identification help.


If that red arrow tee is not leaking, I would not try to replace it, but be careful when you are soldering. If you get that tee too hot, it will compromise the solder joint. I would cut the pipe as close to the leaking tee as I could on that side.
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Old 09-17-2013, 09:31 AM   #13
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Valve identification help.


Do I heat up the tee and try to pull the pipe out of it or do I cut the pipe a couple inches in front of it and put in another coupling?
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Old 09-17-2013, 10:52 AM   #14
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Valve identification help.


No need to unsolder anything. Just cut the pipe on each side of leaking tee (as close as possible to tee, see yellow arrows) and stick a new coupling on each pipe end, and add the appropriate lenght of pipe. By the looks of it, propbably only a 5 or 6 inch piece. Reread post #9.

Have a bucket ready to catch water if you have anything under it, as there will be some water in the pipe even though water is off and all pressure has been relieved. Make sure you get that red cable out of the way first before you start (see orange arrow). Looks like some sort of grounding cable or something.

You mentioned above you know how to solder. Remember not to overheat the pipe and couplings when soldering. When solder starts to suck in, remove heat and make sure solder sucks in all around the joints and you'll be fine. As long as you don't overheat the pipe, I doubt that you will compromise any other fittings.

No need to replace tee with red arrow (in your original pic) if it's not leaking. That blue/green stuff on the tee and on your pipes is just oxidation or the fittings weren't cleaned properly after soldering, no biggy. It can be cleaned off if it bothers you. It does not mean you have to replace it. Thanks.



Last edited by jmon; 11-09-2013 at 09:18 AM.
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