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JLAP 12-20-2009 10:14 PM

uneven heating from hot water system
 
I have four bedrooms on the second floor heated by a zoned hot water system. The thermostat is in my bedroom, the largest of the four rooms, and is set at 68 degrees. The problem is that my room is also the warmest (I superinsulate the windows, have a computer and fish tank in the room, etc.), so, when the temperature reaches 68, the forced hot water heating
shuts down until my room falls below 68. The other three rooms are well below 68.

I will not move the thermostat, since I cannot stand heat above 70 degrees. The four radiators are fed by a three loop system with one
thermostat-controlled pump in the basement.

So, I have two -threequestions. Can I shut down, or rather, partially shut the radiator valve in my room to force more hot water into the other radiators to provide more heat to the other rooms? (I realize this will `take some fine tuning if it can work)

And, if I can, which way do I turn the valve to close it down? I cannot turn the valve knob by hand (probably hasn't been turned for over 50 years), so can I use one of those seen on tv strap wrenches to give me some leverage?

Thanks for any help you can give.

Just Bill 12-21-2009 07:16 AM

If the radiators are in parrallel, and there is a shutoff, I would say you can throttle back on individual units.

beenthere 12-21-2009 07:24 AM

Caution Caution Caution!

Loosen the packing nut on the valve before trying to close it.
It turns clockwise to close.

Be prepared for it to leak atleast a little when you first turn it(the valve).
Then when done closing it down, retighten packing nut.

Before you do this. may want to go and but some packing tape. Incase the packing in the packing nut is worn out. You can repack it if it won't stop leaking.
But has to be done with no pressure at the valve.

Another way to do it.
is simply cover up the rad with a decorative box. that has small openings in it for heat transfer(you would have to have it made).

JLAP 12-21-2009 07:57 AM

Thanks, Just Bill, but based on the second email, I think I'll wait out the
deep cold this year and try this when the temps aren't in the freezing range.

JLAP 12-21-2009 08:02 AM

Many thanks for the quick reply, beenthere. I will wait for more even weather in case there is some need to shut down the heating system and drain the radiators, but I may just build a simple box with an adjustable damper to cover the radiator and control the heat output. It will not be pretty or decorative, just functional.

SULTINI 12-21-2009 08:05 AM

I would move the thermostat to one of the other rooms or to the hallway somewhere and keep the bedroom in question off.

If you can not shut the valves off to your radiator you can block the air flow from entering the bottom of the baseboard( If that's what it is) unless you have the old cast iron radiators that would prevent the circulation of air through the baseboard.

I know you said you did not want the thermostat moved but if you leave it where it is and you block the heat source it will never shut off, you don't want that either$$$$$.

beenthere 12-21-2009 08:07 AM

I've gone to lots of places that tried to adjust the valve. And then had a water leak that wouldn't stop.
So waiting till spring is a good idea.

beenthere 12-21-2009 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SULTINI (Post 370097)

I know you said you did not want the thermostat moved but if you leave it where it is and you block the heat source it will never shut off, you don't want that either$$$$$.


Since he is only lessening the amount of heat(that what the dampers will control). He shouldn't have any real problem.

A lot of people with the old in wall convectors, use to damper down one of the convectors, or shut off one of them in the living room(room with the stat) to get their bedrooms warmer.

AllanJ 12-21-2009 11:53 AM

Quick fix for free standing radiators, cover the ones in the warmer room with blankets or something similar. Adjust the blankets to balance the temperature in the other rooms.

This causes the radiator to release less heat into the room in question and the water in the radiator will be hotter as it progresses to the next room.

Meanwhile clean and vacuum out around the radiators in the colder rooms and don't put furniture or curtains up against those in order that air circulate around them and heat up more quickly. Radiators recessed in the wall and baseboard radiators do accumulate dust.

The radiator no matter how it is covered will not go above the furnace boiler temperature which is somewhere around 180 degrees F.

beenthere 12-21-2009 01:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 370174)
The radiator no matter how it is covered will not go above the furnace boiler temperature which is somewhere around 180 degrees F.

While that is very true.

Blankets at 180F are very easy to start on fire. Even by static electricity. When you go to move them, could start a fire.


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