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Old 08-13-2008, 07:21 AM   #1
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


What does the consensus here say for the best material?

My house (been in it for almost 2 years) had the chrome plated piping that was in bad need of replacement when we moved in. The first time we ran the dishwasher, the pressure from from the drain cycle blew the slip joints apart. So, I replumbed with PVC (which I have used with much success in the past).

Now about 14 months later, one of the joints comes apart, when draining one of the sink bowls (double sink). It had me thinking (while mopping up the floor and drying out the undersink cabinet), what is the bet material for this? In the old days, you would use bronze or copper and have good sealed connections (not of this slip joint stuff), then it got me thinking what others are using?

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Old 08-13-2008, 08:12 AM   #2
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


PVC's basically the industry standard these days, except on pedestal sinks where you can see the drain. When correctly installed, there's no reason it should come apart at all.

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Old 08-13-2008, 12:00 PM   #3
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


Ah, yes.

The drain was fine for almost 14 months. When the drain came apart last night, it was the 1st time that I really took a look at the sink cabinet since I installed the drain (repainted the entire, inside as well). Wow, the S.O. really has crammed that space full of stuff. What I think happened is that she got a few items tight up against the drain and then when more stuff was added, the pipe got askew, and just worked itself loose. Think I will add some blocking directly under the trap to keep everything nice and supported.
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Old 08-13-2008, 02:16 PM   #4
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


Seems you answered your own question. This is a common problem when storage is packed. Most PVC joints only need to be hand tight, and they can be banged while moving stuff around.
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Old 08-13-2008, 04:13 PM   #5
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In my experience PVC outlasts all but the most expensive chrome plated tubular piping every time.
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Old 08-13-2008, 05:55 PM   #6
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


Quote:
Originally Posted by mstplumber View Post
In my experience PVC outlasts all but the most expensive chrome plated tubular piping every time.
It depends on the type of PVC. The schedule 40 traps and U bends are near indestructible and I use them any time I can. Those flimsy PVC P traps (schedule 20 I think) tend to crack over time. Brass is not a bad material they have a lifespan of 25 years or so. I use brass traps anytime the pipe isn't hidden under a vanity and when people use those real thin vanities the brass traps can get you an extra inch closer to the wall when the space is tight.
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Old 08-14-2008, 06:20 AM   #7
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Undersink Drain Piping Material


Another problem I had that lead up to this is the fact that it is a double bowl sink, and the floor penetration for the drain is actually about 4" towards the cabinet wall (away from both bowls), so I had to gang the drains, then put in one trap. Not the strongest! I put some wood blocking under the trap last night. All appears to be good now!

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