DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Turning off water (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/turning-off-water-41613/)

swaterbenny 04-01-2009 08:21 PM

Turning off water
 
We are about to move into a home with well water, and I plan to install a sediment filter. The shut off is right where it comes in, then I planned to turn on the faucets to empty the pipes, but do I have to drain the water heater to avoid getting water everywhere? I'm an electrician not a plumber! Thanks, Ben

Plumber101 04-01-2009 09:03 PM

Just make sure that you close the faucets after you relieve the pressure. This will create a little suction/vav within the lines. Put a coupe towles and a bucket under the pipe and cut away.

You might put a tee inline with a valve off the tee so that if you need to drain the lines in the future.

brokenknee 04-01-2009 09:15 PM

I would put a ball valve after the filter also, that way you do not have to worry about water draining back when changing the filter. There should be a pressure relief button on most filters. If you have a water softener, install the filter before the softener.

swaterbenny 04-01-2009 10:06 PM

Awesome thanks for the help. Would you rec. the softener? I grew up with city water that was fine so we never needed it. I just don't know exactly what it is intended to help with? Thanks, Ben

brokenknee 04-02-2009 04:14 AM

Some of the benefits of soft water, less soap, clothes get cleaner, no hard water spots, your hair doesn't look like wire. If you have well water you most likely have iron in your water also. A softener will take this out up to a point. Iron also stains your fixtures. Those are the main reasons people get softeners.

If you grew up with soft water you most likely will want it. Did you grow up in Mpls? I am pretty sure they soften their water, St. Paul may also but I am not sure.

Have your water tested to see were you are at.

AllanJ 04-02-2009 08:27 AM

Open faucets and drain the pipes above the work area. If you close the faucets too soon, the draining will slow down but not stop until it is done.

This part is unpredictable. As water filling the pipes upstairs falls into a bucket where you are draining, the overhead pipes may fill with air fast enough that siphoning action from the water heater stops and the water flow into your working area also stops reasonably quickly without emptying the tank.

For work on the cold water lines, turn off the cold inlet valve to the water heater (must be there and must work otherwise the preceding paragraph applies).

Turn off the gas or electricity to the water heater before beginning work. Have water gushing from a hot water faucet to prove that the tank is refilled before turning the water heater back on.

swaterbenny 04-02-2009 06:17 PM

No, I'm from Stillwater it's east of the cities. We are moving to Wisconsin and the water is being tested for everything this week, and we should receive results relatively quickly. I have decided that I'm just going to put a softener in and then I won't have to worry about it no matter what. Thanks for all the help. Ben


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:47 PM.