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-   -   Tub spout diverter operation question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/tub-spout-diverter-operation-question-171065/)

daluu 02-05-2013 12:25 AM

Tub spout diverter operation question
 
I'm just wondering how a tub spout diverter is supposed to operate and when it is considered operating incorrectly (and needs replacement).

Typically, you pull up diverter to use the showerhead, and push down (if needed or not in down position currently) to use the tub spout.

* if spout leaks a lot when diverted, time to replace
* if diverter stuck or hard to use, time to replace

The replacement spout I bought to replace old spout says the diverter returns (eventually) to the down position after water flow is stopped. And you pull up on diverter after water is on to switch to showerhead.

Just yesterday, the diverter didn't fall back down long time after water was off (I didn't close the faucets to to the "tightest" off, but was pretty much off and I see no water dripping or water pressure noise). So is that ok, or it indicates a problem?

Also, I haven't used spouts with diverters in a while and was under impression before replacing spout that you could also pull up on diverter before turning on water. Is that ok or does that cause problems?

oh'mike 02-05-2013 07:49 AM

Those diverters wear out or get all limed up and corroded---

On most , water pressure holds the flapper closed--and a small amount of water escapes around the flapper to allow the water in the spout to drain when the water is shut off---

When they allow to much water to pass---it's time to clean with CLR or replace the spout.

I have never had any luck with the 'universal' spouts at the big box stores--junk--all of them.

Get a name brand spout from a plumbing supply house.

There are three types----so remove the spout and take it with you.

1. Push on---slides over a copper stub out--held in place with an Allen screw from underneath.

2. Threaded---fits over a threaded 1/2" nipple---unscrew to remove--you may need to replace the nipple with the correct length to fit the new spout.

3. Delta----this one slips on and is held with an Allen screw--a brass fitting with rubber O rings will be soldered to the copper stub out.

jagans 02-05-2013 08:54 AM

I just replaced mine with a Ball valve. Got tired of the loss of pressure to the head, and water on the floor from overspray. It aint pretty, but I dont GAS! It works now.

Alan 02-05-2013 10:31 AM

I got a replacement one from american standard for free, and it leaked a bit from day one.


It's not a perfect system. That's all I can really say.

Most people don't want to spend the extra cash to put an in wall diverter, so that's what they get.

AllanJ 02-05-2013 12:09 PM

Tubs using a spout diverter have a simple T connection from the faucets/valve and between the shower pipe and the spout feed pipe.

Water goes to the spout by gravity. When you pull the knob, the spout is blocked and then the water goes up to the shower.

Most spout diverters are mechanically designed to drop open when the water is turned off, thus preventing a surprise cold shower to the next person using the tub. Unfortunately corrosion or sediment often causes it to not drop open by itself.

As a rule of thumb, a small drip from the spout when you are using the shower is not considered abnormal or a need for immediate replacement.

It is a good idea to cut a notch at least 3/8 inch square at the bottom of the spout where it would meet the wall. This prevents water that gets between the spout body and the pipe inside, perhaps from an imperfect joint with the feed pipe, from going into the wall and rotting out the wallboard behind the tiles.

daluu 02-06-2013 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 1110136)
It is a good idea to cut a notch at least 3/8 inch square at the bottom of the spout where it would meet the wall. This prevents water that gets between the spout body and the pipe inside, perhaps from an imperfect joint with the feed pipe, from going into the wall and rotting out the wallboard behind the tiles.

Can you elaborate on that or provide photos? I don't quite get what you mean, though I do get that you mean leak prevention. What to cut exactly?

I read online somewhere there was suggestion to caulk around the hole where the spout valve/pipe protrudes out the wall so that it blocks water entering the wall through the pipe as you mentioned. Though I assume that works best only when the hole is only slightly bigger than the pipe coming out the wall.

AllanJ 02-06-2013 08:00 PM

1 Attachment(s)
The notch is made in the base of the spout. If water got inside the spout, it would drain out through the notch.

daluu 02-06-2013 08:16 PM

Thanks for the info Allan. The universal spout I have already has the notch to accomodate push in spouts that have a screw to secure the copper pipe the spout attaches to, which typically seems to be in that location, though mine was a threaded screw in spout one instead.


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