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-   -   Tub Drain Removal Tool (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/tub-drain-removal-tool-23320/)

rjordan392 07-07-2008 06:23 PM

Tub Drain Removal Tool
 
Hello,
I just tried to use that special tool for removing tub drains and I question the instructions as it states to keep turning the center stem with a cresent wrench while holding the hex nut with another cresent wrench until the drain breaks free?????
This tool is designed to grip the sides of the drain. I turned the stem until I could not turn the stem any further. But the questions is: How can it break free if its threaded in. Am I dealing with bad instructions? I also tried turning the hex nut counterclockwise and the tool slips. If I try to make this tool fit tighter with a bigger wrench, I think I am taking a chance on breaking the cast iron tub or messing up the internal threads. Right now, I put some liquid wrench around the drain and will try again tomorrow with some heat from a hair dryer.
As a last resort, I might have to use "Mike Swearingen's" tip on using a hacksaw to make a notch on the lip of the drain and use a hammer and chisel to drive it counterclockwise.
I have a propane torch but am hesitant in using it for fear of damaging the porcelion. Is there any thing I can try before going with the hammer and chisel?

billie_t 07-07-2008 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjordan392 (Post 136931)
Hello,
I just tried to use that special tool for removing tub drains and I question the instructions as it states to keep turning the center stem with a cresent wrench while holding the hex nut with another cresent wrench until the drain breaks free?????
This tool is designed to grip the sides of the drain. I turned the stem until I could not turn the stem any further. But the questions is: How can it break free if its threaded in. Am I dealing with bad instructions? I also tried turning the hex nut counterclockwise and the tool slips. If I try to make this tool fit tighter with a bigger wrench, I think I am taking a chance on breaking the cast iron tub or messing up the internal threads. Right now, I put some liquid wrench around the drain and will try again tomorrow with some heat from a hair dryer.
As a last resort, I might have to use "Mike Swearingen's" tip on using a hacksaw to make a notch on the lip of the drain and use a hammer and chisel to drive it counterclockwise.
I have a propane torch but am hesitant in using it for fear of damaging the porcelion. Is there any thing I can try before going with the hammer and chisel?

not sure if i am talking about the same thing here or not but.....when i needed to get my drain out of my tub i tried about all i could find out..then i looked in the drain and seen my drain had a cross in it ..so i found a piece of pipe that fit inside the drain...used my trusty electric grinder to notch out the pipe in four spots to fit snugly over the cross and turned it gently with a pipe wrench...worked for me

rjordan392 07-07-2008 08:06 PM

There are two tools for removing the drains and I have both. The first tool is simular to what you made up. The second tool (more expensive) is for use if the first fails. The second tool is designed to grip the sides of the drain when turning the center stem. But my drain is sealed in tight and I believe the instructions for using it are wrong because it appears that the drain is supposed to pop out. But I can't see how this works if the drain is threaded in. So I adjusted the tool to grip tightly and tried to turn it counterclockwise and the tool slips around the drain hole.

Alan 07-07-2008 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjordan392 (Post 136958)
There are two tools for removing the drains and I have both. The first tool is simular to what you made up. The second tool (more expensive) is for use if the first fails. The second tool is designed to grip the sides of the drain when turning the center stem. But my drain is sealed in tight and I believe the instructions for using it are wrong because it appears that the drain is supposed to pop out. But I can't see how this works if the drain is threaded in. So I adjusted the tool to grip tightly and tried to turn it counterclockwise and the tool slips around the drain hole.

I've never used one, but perhaps it needs to be even tighter.

billie_t 07-07-2008 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjordan392 (Post 136958)
There are two tools for removing the drains and I have both. The first tool is simular to what you made up. The second tool (more expensive) is for use if the first fails. The second tool is designed to grip the sides of the drain when turning the center stem. But my drain is sealed in tight and I believe the instructions for using it are wrong because it appears that the drain is supposed to pop out. But I can't see how this works if the drain is threaded in. So I adjusted the tool to grip tightly and tried to turn it counterclockwise and the tool slips around the drain hole.

i have only ever taken 3 apart myself...they have all been (or looked like) steel threaded into brass,,it is hard to believe it could be corroded that bad that is siezed that hard...but it must be
maybe a real plumber can help you out..almost certain one will chime in soon

rjordan392 07-08-2008 05:33 AM

The tub drain is about 53 years old and is the original. I am wondering if plumbers did tub drains differantly then they do today. Could they have installed the drain as an assembly and soldered it in from underneath the tub. There is an access panel where I can get to the plumbing. I'll take a look at it to see if I can determine anything. Its fortunate for me that I have an additional full bathroom because this is going to take longer then I expected. I put some liquid wrench on it to see if that helps. I also turned up the hotwater heater temperature to its highest setting. I believe this will be better to use then a hair dryer to soften a seized part.

rjordan392 07-08-2008 11:39 AM

Update on Tub Drain Removal Tool:

First of all, I was able to remove the drain, using a hammer and chisel. it took about 6 to 7 revolutions of the drain before I was able to remove it by hand. The revolutions were not easy and it was slow going to make it rotate with each hammer tap. I made a V-notch on the lip of the drain and cut about a little less then 1/16 inch into it. Then I use a marking pencil and place a mark just below the V on the porcelin part of the tub. I wanted to make sure that it would move. Using my chisel, I place it into one side of the V and tap counterclockwise. After a few taps, I could see it moving and with each tap, the V started to open up giving me a bigger bite to work with. I made two V's on opposite sides. It took about 45 minutes to an hour before I was able to remove it. It was seized up real well.

Now for the tub drain tool:
When a tub drain is seized up as bad as mine was, then this tool is useless. All it does is apply pressure to the sides of the drain. The instructions that came with it are not correct. It states to keep on turning the threaded center stem counterclockwise until the drain breaks free. This is impossible because the tighter you turn the stem in, the tighter the male drain threads are pressed against the female threads. Even after realizing this, I use a wrench to rotate the the whole tool in the hopes it would also rotate the drain and all it did was slide around the hole. It cost me $40.84 to find out that this tool is useless for seized tub drains. You can view this tool at: www.plumbingsupply.com
Go to the alphabet index and click on T, then look for Tub drain removal tool. There are two tools. The one I am referring to has three shoes encircling a cone shaped stem that will expand the shoes as the center stem is turned counterclockwise.

Now this tool may work on drains that are less seized then mine but don't follow the instructions if it says to keep turning the center stem. This is wrong. Just turn it enough to give you a bite on sides of the drain. If it slips when you try to turn the whole tool like I think it will; then its probally time to get out the hammer and chisel.

Before I installed the new drain, I placed a few wraps of teflon tape around the threads in the hope that it will prevent seizing in case it needs to be removed at a later time. I used a bit of plumbers putty on the underside of the new drain for sealing.
And the rubber or vinyl washer that comes with the new drain, is installed on top of the fitting on the underside of the tub. It does not go between the tub surface and the new drain. The instructions on my new drain did not mention this.


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