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-   -   Toilet on conrete - floor clearance (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/toilet-conrete-floor-clearance-163433/)

latelifebiker 11-15-2012 12:38 PM

Toilet on conrete - floor clearance
 
This is in my basement workshop. Despite careful planning:whistling2:, when I poured the replacement concrete in the trench for the drain on my new toilet installation, I ended up with a clearance issue. I'm sure it was the result of adjusting the run of 4" pipe for proper fall on its way to the sub-concrete soil stack. Anyway, after the pour about 3/4 of an inch of the closet bend's top hub is above the concrete floor line (the inserted 4" down-pipe extends a foot above that).
After I install porcelain floor tile, the lip of the closet bend's top hub will still be about 3/8 of an inch proud of the finish floor surface. Even if I cut the down-pipe flush with the top of the hub, I'll have a lousy situation for fitting a floor flange, which won't rest on the tile. My first thought was to lay a half-inch sheet of Durock under the tile, but my whole purpose in choosing tile was to keep the finish floor as thin as possible to avoid a step up from the basement shop space. AND the Durock would provide a weak hold for the anchor screws to secure the flange.
What I'm wondering is:huh:: Can I lay the tile, let it set, and then make the horizontal cut on the down-pipe to INCLUDE that 3/8 of an inch of the hub? There would still be the stub of the down-pipe cemented inside the hub to receive the floor flange. I can see that I might have to shorten the nose piece of floor flange by 3/8", as well.
BTW, it's a DRY basement. Any thoughts will aid me in solving this problem. Thanks.
-paul

TheEplumber 11-15-2012 01:29 PM

Your solution will work OK- cut off to finish floor or the what you need to fit the flange. Test fit the toilet to make sure the flange is not too high. Some toilets have clearance issues when a thick flange is above the floor.

DannyT 11-15-2012 02:06 PM

cement board on a concrete floor is no good. if you ran 4 inch a 3 inch flange used to glue right into 4 inch pvc pipe.

latelifebiker 11-15-2012 05:45 PM

Without Durock--or SOME spacer-- on the concrete floor I have a serious clearance problem with the closet bend keeping the floor flange raised well above the finish floor. Thus my question about cutting off a bit of the closet bend hub wall.

oh'mike 11-15-2012 07:12 PM

Post a picture----there are a lot of different flanges----although some modification may be needed---it can be done----

cleveman 11-15-2012 08:19 PM

Make a template of the bottom of the toilet, and lay a layer or two of tile where the toilet will sit, plus maybe 1/2" all the way around.

This will just raise the toilet and will be such a pain to do that you will surely never mess up your flange height again.

latelifebiker 11-15-2012 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cleveman (Post 1053136)
Make a template of the bottom of the toilet, and lay a layer or two of tile where the toilet will sit, plus maybe 1/2" all the way around.
This will just raise the toilet and will be such a pain to do that you will surely never mess up your flange height again.

You're too late. I've already been ruthlessly punished by my wife, the quality control inspector. :furious:

latelifebiker 11-15-2012 10:36 PM

Here's the photo. It doesn't show much that I didn't describe in the OP.

http://i637.photobucket.com/albums/u...oiletdrain.jpg

TheEplumber 11-15-2012 11:02 PM

Cut it off at the top of concrete, then lay your tile or install the flange. Make sure the flange doesn't set too far into the 90 and interfere with the radius of the fitting- dry fit it first without glue. You can trim the pipe end of the flange if needed. I've actually cut hubs down to less then an inch before with no issues

latelifebiker 11-15-2012 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1053227)
Cut it off at the top of concrete, then lay your tile or install the flange. Make sure the flange doesn't set too far into the 90 and interfere with the radius of the fitting- dry fit it first without glue. You can trim the pipe end of the flange if needed. I've actually cut hubs down to less then an inch before with no issues

Many thanks. That was my thinking as stated in the OP, but I just need some support. This isn't my first rodeo, but it's the first one where I got throwed so hard in the early goin'.
Regards.
-paul

TheEplumber 11-15-2012 11:25 PM

I hear ya. But then if everything was simple- life would be boring :thumbsup:


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