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-   -   Thought on rust particulate coming up a new drilled well? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/thought-rust-particulate-coming-up-new-drilled-well-163094/)

GuyFromTheNorth 11-12-2012 02:32 PM

Thought on rust particulate coming up a new drilled well?
 
Hey everyone, I did alot of searching while setting up the new well and got some great info here, thanks!

I had a few questions though now that my well is established. It's a drilled cased 6" well, 86' deep, pumping at 60'. I'm using 100psi CSA approved water pipe to a submersible pump with a torque arrestor attached about 2' up the line and my electrical and safety line secured to the water pipe.

I've been pumping out of the well for about 2 weeks now. The water runs clean about 90% of the time, every so often though the water will go off colour a bit. It's not enough to notice while it's flowing from the faucet but if you fill a white procelain bowl you can tell it's "off". The clarity is perfect however. But when it goes slightly off you can find TINY, smaller than the head of a pin and you can't even "feel" them with your skin, particulate in the water. I think the small pieces are rust, as well as the off colour of the water being rust related.

It was coming and going now and then, so today I installed a Rainfresh whole house high flow water filter in line between the pump and the pressure tank\switch under my house. The filter seems to have eliminated the off colour and tiny bits (for now).

LONG STORY SHORT (sorry for all the background info, I wanted to make sure everyone knows the story):

-Do new wells always take a while to sort out the bits of rust? They are extremely tiny, maybe saw 4-5 bits for a half gallon of water (before filter). It seems to be the rust must be tiny flakes coming off the well casing?

-How does everyone feel about "whole house water filters" it's a 5 micron one, I only have it in place to deal with particulate. It says the lifespan is 4-8 months per cartridge but I'm inclined to change it once per month, 2 months max, because I'd be scared of it failing one day and becoming plugged.



EDIT: I also sent out water samples to be tested for coliform and the test failed due to "interference within the sample preventing testing". The health advisor told me it may be sediment related preventing testing, so hopefully the new filter solves that issue as well.

joed 11-12-2012 02:48 PM

Does the problem seem worse when it rains? Could be a ground water infiltration issue. Have you contacted the driller ask him what he thinks?

GuyFromTheNorth 11-12-2012 03:35 PM

No change during rain or snow from what I can tell. I'd imagine everything is sealed up nicely from surface water, proper cap on it and all. Any rain we got lately (and snow) definitely wan't enough to purge down into the well, I think the most we got lately was maybe 2-3mm over 24hours.

EDIT: and it's definitely rust colouration and particulate in the water, not sediment or "mud".

joecaption 11-12-2012 03:52 PM

Old steel pipes for supply lines in the house?

Daniel Holzman 11-12-2012 05:00 PM

I do not know how your community operates, but where I live every new well requires a water test to be performed by a laboratory before the well is approved by the town for use as potable water. Even if your community does not require a chemical test, it would be a good idea to have a lab do a series of tests so you can determine exactly what is in the water, as there could be many substances that would meet your description. How you deal with the particulate in your well water depends entirely on what it is, and it is unlikely anyone on an internet chat forum can accurately guess what you might have.

southernkilowat 11-12-2012 05:27 PM

Have you looked at the water in the toilet tanks now that you have the well up and running. Usually its a pretty good indicator of whats going on because the sediment will settle there in the bottom of the tank. I have washed down plenty of wells in my day and you can expect the water to be less than perfect for at least a month until everything settles in the well. I dont think you have any reason to be concerned as far as water quality goes but a good water test is a good idea just to be sure.
Here in the eastern part of NC the soil is very sandy and I have seen wells that have been fine for years suddenly develop sand and silt, its from the natural settling of the earth and is normal.
SK

GuyFromTheNorth 11-12-2012 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by southernkilowat (Post 1050605)
Have you looked at the water in the toilet tanks now that you have the well up and running. Usually its a pretty good indicator of whats going on because the sediment will settle there in the bottom of the tank. I have washed down plenty of wells in my day and you can expect the water to be less than perfect for at least a month until everything settles in the well. I dont think you have any reason to be concerned as far as water quality goes but a good water test is a good idea just to be sure.
Here in the eastern part of NC the soil is very sandy and I have seen wells that have been fine for years suddenly develop sand and silt, its from the natural settling of the earth and is normal.
SK


Thanks this is kinda what I was looking for. More info as requested: no steel lines feeding the house, everything is brand new up to the pressure tank, the tank is only a few years old and every fitting from it on is brass or copper. No rust was seen coming up when I used to pump from the lake (although algae was present in the tanks).

After more hours of regular water useage the water is dead clear, it might as well be from a bottle of water. So that tells me the slight orange\yellow tinge was most likely oxide that is being dissolved into the water. The inside of the casing IS steel and because I live in a sandy formation they had to drill it using a drive shoe and putting the bit down inside the casing as it was drilling. Which also makes me think the scraping against the casing disturbed the top layers of metal causing rust to form up.

I am sending out more bio tests tomorrow, should know by friday the state of coliform in the water. After they pass I paying out of pocket for a metals, hardness, and other toxins test. I guess some idea of the water helps for those curious. I live right on the shore of a spring-fed trout lake, the water is dead clear even in the parts that are over 65' deep (with the exception of a slight blueish tinge). The well I drilled punched into one of the dozen or so springs that feeds the lake. I know this because the drillers confirmed it, but also because the spring vents into the bottom of the lake directly in front of my house. So the water I'm sure is quite fine to drink, the rust I'm seeing is particulate, like the kind you could scrape off an old rusty car but very very tiny in size. The well sat for 4 days with it's water AND the chlorination the drillers put in, I don't know if that could caused more oxide to precipitate than usual.

EDIT: I should also mention when I would get the off-colour bits there was no smell to the water at all, even when running it hot there was nothing to detect. I didn't taste it as I'm still waiting on coliform tests.

TheEplumber 11-12-2012 09:06 PM

I'm thirsty now:thumbsup:

md2lgyk 11-13-2012 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GuyFromTheNorth (Post 1050836)
I didn't taste it as I'm still waiting on coliform tests.

What??? Your well is up and running, supplying the house, and hasn't been tested for coliform? That would certainly not fly where I live.

GuyFromTheNorth 11-13-2012 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1051098)
What??? Your well is up and running, supplying the house, and hasn't been tested for coliform? That would certainly not fly where I live.


I don't live in a municipality or a city of any kind, literally on a lake in the "forest". I do own the land of course though. There are no regulations for my water hook up other than the government agency (ministry of environment) has to receive paperwork from my driller saying he put a drinking water well in, the specs, and the date it was done. After that I'm responsible for the installation, testing and upkeep. Like I said, I have no reason to fear the water, in fact even pumping directly from the lake the water passed the biological tests done by the government.

That being said I won't drink it until I confirm it passes the testing. The reason it's hooked up and running is I live in a very rural area of Northern Ontario. The well drilling company was severely delayed in arrival (booked in August, they didn't show up till Halloween). Because they showed up so late I was in a panic to beat the frost line in the ground. I had the water line trench dug as soon as I could get a backhoe on site and buried it while it was snowing on me and -8deg. If it wasn't for the winter hurry I would have been able to more leisurely pursue testing and setup, but winter waits for no man that's for sure.

Thanks to everyone who responded, the sediment filter is still going strong and the new samples went off today for testing at the lab, I hope to find out the results on Friday. :thumbup:


EDIT: oh and for those curious why I discontinued my lake source of water if it was so good, it was a matter of reliability. With a drilled well if my pump blows up or something breaks I can pop the cap and service it. The lake pump was in a subterranean "pumphouse" 6 feet underground sealed from the elements, which made is less than easy to service in the -40's of January. As well the steel intake pipe that was installed in the lake (in the 70's if I remember right) involved dredging out an trench from shore to about 30' out into the lake to bury the pipe deep enough so it would not freeze. The footvalve on that pipe (and the pipe) is failing, and by todays environmental laws in Canada I cannot just "dig a trench" out into a trout lake anymore as it would silt out a large portion of the lake for a long time. So in a nutshell, the well had to be drilled as the lake supply could "up and fail" anytime and become un-serviceable.


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