DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Thinking about adding a half bath in basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/thinking-about-adding-half-bath-basement-108804/)

stradt03 06-26-2011 06:54 AM

Thinking about adding a half bath in basement
 
Hi all,

I am sketching ideas for finishing the basement and it makes sense to add in a half bath. I'm a novice at this and I am having a hard time visualizing how the sewer lines will connect to my main line out of the house. I would think that with the current position I won't be able to tie into it and obtain flow via gravity. I've attached a picture for your review and am willing to listen to any and all ideas.

Thanks!
Jason

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...3/photo2-5.jpg

12penny 06-26-2011 06:59 AM

Upflush toilet. Google "saniflo". Expensive but they work pretty good.

oh'mike 06-26-2011 07:11 AM

Plan on digging a hole for a sewage pit/pump.

Pits with lid--about $60-- Good pumps--$300 to $400

stradt03 06-26-2011 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 674239)
Plan on digging a hole for a sewage pit/pump.

Pits with lid--about $60-- Good pumps--$300 to $400

Any more info/articles on this? What about code references?

Thanks,

Jason

oh'mike 06-26-2011 10:23 AM

That is the standard ,and has been for about 40 years. I wonder if you already have one?

Typically in a house with an elevated sewer line there are two pits---one sump pit for storm water that is pumped outside and another for sewage (laundry sinks,furnace condensation and floor drains) that is pumped into the house hold drains .

This pit will have a sealed lid and a second pipe that is a vent for sewer gas.

Use google images for sewage pit----Mike---

oh'mike 06-26-2011 10:34 AM

One of the licensed plumbers will be along shortly with code references and perhaps a picture or better description for you.---Mike----

stradt03 06-26-2011 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 674315)
That is the standard ,and has been for about 40 years. I wonder if you already have one?

Typically in a house with an elevated sewer line there are two pits---one sump pit for storm water that is pumped outside and another for sewage (laundry sinks,furnace condensation and floor drains) that is pumped into the house hold drains .

This pit will have a sealed lid and a second pipe that is a vent for sewer gas.

Use google images for sewage pit----Mike---

I google'd "residential sewer pit" and I don't think I have one of those. I also traced the main sewer line in the house and it's a straight shot out as seen in the photo I posted above.

TheEplumber 06-26-2011 10:19 PM

You'll want what we call a grinder pump (capable of pumping solids). It's used when you have to pump a toilet as well as a shower and lav.
Plan on supplying a separate elect. circuit to the pump and a 2" vent that will tie into your existing vent system, or if required, vent through the roof.
The pump will be sized by how high you need to lift the waste before it ties into your building drain. Yours appears to be about 6'.
You will plumb your new fixtures as normal, including vents. Then run the under slab sub drain to the pump basin. From there, the pump will lift it to your existing building drain.

stradt03 07-06-2011 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 674315)
That is the standard ,and has been for about 40 years. I wonder if you already have one?

Typically in a house with an elevated sewer line there are two pits---one sump pit for storm water that is pumped outside and another for sewage (laundry sinks,furnace condensation and floor drains) that is pumped into the house hold drains .

This pit will have a sealed lid and a second pipe that is a vent for sewer gas.

Use google images for sewage pit----Mike---

What is this? It is in the floor of my basement in the corner. The PVC pipe going into it comes from the HVAC system condensate drain. The top of this thing is kind of sealed, do I want to open it up to see what is in there? Is this something that could be used for the bathroom project?
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...3/photo2-7.jpg

thanks for the knowledge!

oh'mike 07-07-2011 05:36 AM

Sure,open that thing and see what's going on.

I see no pump pipes exiting the pit---odd.

stradt03 07-07-2011 04:17 PM

Well I'm not impressed. It's a sump basin with no sump. However, there is an active HVAC condensate line that drains to it. I suppose the builder didn't think about what happens once the basin fills up with condensate? That really frustrates me. :-/

oh'mike 07-08-2011 06:38 AM

The house may not have had an air conditioner when built. The heating installed should have spotted that.


Often it's cheaper to locate a new pit closer to the bathroom----cutting and trenching across a room is a waste of time and money---

If you wish to cure the pumpless pit---look into a 'condensate' pump --tiny pump/basin that hangs from the side of the furnace and is then piped (tubing) to an over head drain pipe.

stradt03 07-08-2011 07:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 681876)
The house may not have had an air conditioner when built. The heating installed should have spotted that.


Often it's cheaper to locate a new pit closer to the bathroom----cutting and trenching across a room is a waste of time and money---

If you wish to cure the pumpless pit---look into a 'condensate' pump --tiny pump/basin that hangs from the side of the furnace and is then piped (tubing) to an over head drain pipe.

The house was built in December '10.

I think I may just go with an upflush toilet like a Liberty Ascent or Saniflo.

Any experience with these types?

stradt03 05-22-2013 09:54 AM

Thanks for the info. I was transferred with my job and we sold the house in July '12.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:45 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved