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-   -   Is there a better way? Sink drain (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/there-better-way-sink-drain-202652/)

rjniles 06-24-2014 02:10 PM

Is there a better way? Sink drain
 
As part of my kitchen remodel I had new counters installed with an under-mount SS sink. The bowls have different depths with the deep one on the left. I also needed a dishwasher connection. The picture shows what I did:
The deep bowl on the left has a short tail piece then a 90 bend with a short pipe to a baffle tee. The shallow bowl on the right has a DW tailpiece, then a 90 bend with a short pipe to the baffle tee. The baffle tee connects to the P trap.

Everything lines up fine, drains well and no leaks. My concern is the total number of joints. Is there a better way to do this and reduce the number of slip joints?

http://www.diychatroom.com/albums/th...?dl=1403636464

jponto07 06-24-2014 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1367817)

Everything lines up fine, drains well and no leaks. My concern is the total number of joints. Is there a better way to do this and reduce the number of slip joints?

http://www.diychatroom.com/albums/th...?dl=1403636464

If you have installed the washer thing correctly at each joint, you'll be fine. Another alternative would be to replace everything with schedule 40 PVC and glue the joints.

If you do this be sure you get an appropriate trap that can be drained. However, the dishwasher could potentially cause issues with clogging. I'm sure some plumbers may have different opinions on this matter-hopefully someone will chime in.

ben's plumbing 06-24-2014 05:55 PM

you will be fine....I like to use 2-p traps one for each side.....

Ghostmaker 06-24-2014 06:42 PM

No problem with what you did it's a center outlet waste.

rjniles 06-24-2014 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ben's plumbing (Post 1367920)
you will be fine....I like to use 2-p traps one for each side.....

I considered that but how would I connect 2 traps to the existing trap adapter coming out of the wall? Use the baffle tee horizontally coming out of the trap adapter?

ben's plumbing 06-24-2014 08:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1367947)
I considered that but how would I connect 2 traps to the existing trap adapter coming out of the wall? Use the baffle tee horizontally coming out of the trap adapter?

would have to use female adapter and 1 1/2 wye to split for dual traps ..if there would be room ..if not.. have to cut wall...but as i said what you have is fine....:yes:

ccbs1 06-25-2014 10:56 PM

I usually use a 2" rubber 90* elbow on each drain into a glued together 2" PVC. Each sink basin feeds into a double wye, dishwasher into the top of the wye, with a single 2" PVC trap on the bottom of the wye. Use the trap with the screw fitting so I can take it off for servicing.

Never leaks even with rental tenants knocking it around and the 2" piping drains quite fast.

ccbs1 06-25-2014 11:05 PM

This one has a disposal but you get the idea. If you point the 90* elbows to the rear all of the plumbing sits at the rear of the cabinet and you gain a lot of usable space. I cannot express in words how much I dislike those screw together sink drain kits.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

SHR Plumber 06-26-2014 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccbs1 (Post 1368515)
I usually use a 2" rubber 90* elbow on each drain into a glued together 2" PVC. Each sink basin feeds into a double wye, dishwasher into the top of the wye, with a single 2" PVC trap on the bottom of the wye. Use the trap with the screw fitting so I can take it off for servicing.

Never leaks even with rental tenants knocking it around and the 2" piping drains quite fast.

Do not do it, no rubber couplings! Me thinks there is no way you used 2" drain piping. All wall outlets for kitchen sinks are 1 1/2" unless specifically build differently. Never have a larger pipe drain in to a smaller pipe.

ccbs1 06-26-2014 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SHR Plumber (Post 1368866)
Do not do it, no rubber couplings! Me thinks there is no way you used 2" drain piping. All wall outlets for kitchen sinks are 1 1/2" unless specifically build differently. Never have a larger pipe drain in to a smaller pipe.

My mistake, been a while since I did one. 1.5" from the sink drains to 2" double wye. 2" trap and wall outlet.

Curious as to why on the rubber couplings? Mine have been trouble free for over 7 years now, the rentals for over 5 (and the tenants are usually quite rough). I was doing a far amount of traveling for a while and always poke around hotel rooms and I saw several of the higher end hotels plumbed in a similar way for the bathroom and kitchenette with 1.5" piping. Some were run with rubber 90* elbows and others with a PVC 90* elbow and a rubber straight coupler.

Bob Sanders 06-26-2014 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccbs1 (Post 1368873)
Curious as to why on the rubber couplings? .

Yeah... I'd like to hear that too. I see nothing wrong with rubber at all. In fact they sell those one piece rubber p traps for bathroom sinks.... Love em! Easy to install, easy to remove for cleaning, easy to replace. I know one plumber who calls it "cheating"... but cheating from what exactly?

Ghostmaker 06-26-2014 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccbs1 (Post 1368873)
My mistake, been a while since I did one. 1.5" from the sink drains to 2" double wye. 2" trap and wall outlet.

Curious as to why on the rubber couplings? Mine have been trouble free for over 7 years now, the rentals for over 5 (and the tenants are usually quite rough). I was doing a far amount of traveling for a while and always poke around hotel rooms and I saw several of the higher end hotels plumbed in a similar way for the bathroom and kitchenette with 1.5" piping. Some were run with rubber 90* elbows and others with a PVC 90* elbow and a rubber straight coupler.

Rubber couplings do not meet the plumbing code requirements. They only show to a plumber that a hack did the repair. The do not meet code because first they do not hold pipe alignment solidly. And second they leave ledges for garbage to accumulate on. Next time you have a DWV fitting and a pipe insert the pipe and notice it makes a nice smooth connection.

Ghostmaker 06-26-2014 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Sanders (Post 1368877)
Yeah... I'd like to hear that too. I see nothing wrong with rubber at all. In fact they sell those one piece rubber p traps for bathroom sinks.... Love em! Easy to install, easy to remove for cleaning, easy to replace. I know one plumber who calls it "cheating"... but cheating from what exactly?


You always have a choice in life. Either do a sloppy hack repair our do it the right way the first time that meets all applicable code requirements.

ccbs1 06-26-2014 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ghostmaker (Post 1368892)
Rubber couplings do not meet the plumbing code requirements. They only show to a plumber that a hack did the repair. The do not meet code because first they do not hold pipe alignment solidly. And second they leave ledges for garbage to accumulate on. Next time you have a DWV fitting and a pipe insert the pipe and notice it makes a nice smooth connection.

Can't argue with that, looking at the UPC the rubber elbows are not allowed. A PVC elbow with a shielded straight rubber coupler looks like a viable alternative.


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