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Old 04-13-2013, 10:31 AM   #31
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Sump Pump/Water Flow HELP


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That, I do not know. I also dont know how high the water table is. I will have more information/knowledge of what I am dealing with after the spring thaw/rains end and things dry out.

I can only assume, based on what the previous homeowner had told me, that this is primarily a spring problem, as I seriously doubt ANYONE would spend 20-30k on a basement finished like this is, if the problem was bad year round, as he built the home on 2002 and didnt do the basement until 2009. He also didnt have a battery backup installed until he lost power in 2011 and the basement flooded (he caught it quickly enough to where they only needed to replace the carpet).

Also, I have specific sump pump insurance, should the basement flood due to loss of power and or sump pump failure.
OK so is it fair to assume that your house uses a septic system for sanitary waste disposal? How does that work with a relatively high water table? Im not trying to be a pain, but I have to wonder why a builder would install a full basement, instead of building on a slab, and building more square footage above the known water problem.

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Old 04-13-2013, 10:48 AM   #32
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Sump Pump/Water Flow HELP


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OK so is it fair to assume that your house uses a septic system for sanitary waste disposal? How does that work with a relatively high water table? Im not trying to be a pain, but I have to wonder why a builder would install a full basement, instead of building on a slab, and building more square footage above the known water problem.
It's almost always what's called an "artificial water table", and is created by putting a large hole in the ground, surrounded by fast perculating aggregate. The entire drainage system is designed to be a "weak link" for the water, so that it enters the system as quickly as possible, and ultimately gets directed to the sump crock and pumped out. The faster this takes place, the less likely the water will ever reach a point high enough to create a leak above floor level...............
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:12 PM   #33
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A septic system leach field installed below the water table will not work. Before it was installed, "perc tests" were done involving digging holes here and there, pouring water into the holes, and timing the soaking of the water into the ground. If the water table was above the hole bottom then the water poured into the hole will stay there indefinitely. In that case the leach field should never be (have been) put there.

A layer of fast percolating aggregate over the "permanently saturated" ground as part of the leach field won't accomplish anything unless this layer continues on downhill to some place (could be the reaching of sloping ground surface) where the water ultimately goes without ever backing up to the leach field propler.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 04-13-2013 at 11:29 PM.
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Old 04-14-2013, 03:29 AM   #34
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Gentlemen,

I offer up this video as proof as to why I do not want my tiles filled with water. My flow right now is about what this guy is experiencing, however, he has his float set very high allowing all his tiles to fill with water - please watch the entire video, because at the end he shows you where the slab meets the basement wall. Since my basement is completely finished, this is what I want to avoid.

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Old 04-14-2013, 11:12 AM   #35
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I don't know how to do the math on this, but what if you put in a new primary pump that was smaller or smaller piping to reduce the output of the pump. My thought is you would pump out at the same rate as the water flows in. The pump would not shut off and you wouldn't have the waterfall noises. You could set the old pump to turn on at a higher level should the flow exceed the new pump.
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:43 AM   #36
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Not sure what you mean?
In foundation waterproofing, as with most things, prevention is far more effective than correction. So if your objective is to keep water from seeping into the basement and damaging the foundation, nothing works better than draining water away from the house as efficiently as possible.
When problems occur, contractors say they usually arise from poor installation of foundation drains and improper backfilling and grading of soil around the house. If these parts are done right, there won’t be much water against which to waterproof. Do them wrong, and the problems could soak you in more ways than one.
Problems that occur

Damp basements
Cracked concrete due to hydrostatic pressure
Mold mildew issues
Water has to go somewhere it will enter the basement.
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:23 PM   #37
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Thanks for the response!
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Old 04-15-2013, 06:58 AM   #38
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Sump Pump/Water Flow HELP


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OK so is it fair to assume that your house uses a septic system for sanitary waste disposal? How does that work with a relatively high water table? Im not trying to be a pain, but I have to wonder why a builder would install a full basement, instead of building on a slab, and building more square footage above the known water problem.
It's common out here for some reason.

When we moved into our place it needed an entirely new drain field and when they did the work it was extremely wet and they raised the tanks at that time to account for the high water table. So there's a small hill in our front yard now. But everyone's septic works fine somehow, and most of us have basements/lower levels. But we rely on sump pumps.

The drain field was an amazing project to watch. It's a half acre area about 40 feet down that they fill with graded aggregate.

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Old 05-07-2013, 01:26 PM   #39
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Since your basement is finished, I would highly suggest installing a water alarm in addition to everything else you have going on. Sounds like your sump pump is getting a lot of work in. Being that you already mentioned having a switch problem, the water alarm will insure that you are aware if there is unwanted leakage or moisture. It's better to protect your investment than to spend additional in costly repairs. Best of luck.



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