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Old 02-26-2011, 10:56 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
Readjust the floats and switches.
1. So it turns on when the first drain tile opening into the pit has just begun to get submerged,
2. So it turns off when the pit is as empty as possible but not requiring the float to hit bottom, which could result in unreliable shutoff.
For the most part, float activation is not recommended to be adjusted.

If one wants their pump to activate sooner....below the drain tile, they should consider a sump pump with a vertical float vice tethered float.

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Old 02-27-2011, 07:10 AM   #47
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In order to give the sump pump a reasonable running time and a reasonable rest between runs, either you need a straight sided pit with a large surface area or a pump with a large start height / stop height adjustment together with a pit that is reasonably deep.

If the check valve in the outlet pipe leaks a little, it is not performing its function and water in the outlet pipe is falling back down. This consumes some of the space in the pit so less new water is needed to start the pump again (undesirable).

To reduce basement humidity that may be caused by the sump pump, you would put a lid on the pit. Whether the pit is almost empty or almost full does not affect the humidity.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 02-27-2011 at 07:22 AM.
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Old 02-27-2011, 07:49 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
In order to give the sump pump a reasonable running time and a reasonable rest between runs, either you need a straight sided pit with a large surface area or a pump with a large start height / stop height adjustment together with a pit that is reasonably deep.

If the check valve in the outlet pipe leaks a little, it is not performing its function and water in the outlet pipe is falling back down. This consumes some of the space in the pit so less new water is needed to start the pump again (undesirable).

To reduce basement humidity that may be caused by the sump pump, you would put a lid on the pit. Whether the pit is almost empty or almost full does not affect the humidity.
Pumps in general operate on a timer. Once the tethered float initiates the pump when the water level reaches the activation height, as soon as the circuit is open within the float as the water level drops, the pump will shut off in x seconds whether the pit is empty or not. I think this is a design feature that prevents the pump from continously pumping dry.

This is the same for vertical float pumps where the pump is activated as soon as the float hits the high point and then a timer determines when the pump stops no matter where the float is.

Last edited by handy man88; 02-27-2011 at 07:54 AM.
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Old 02-27-2011, 08:28 AM   #49
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I didn't know that any sump pumps operate on a timer but if they did, then certain conditions can result in unnecessarily short on off cycles. If that model of pump is not adversely affected by short cycles then that is okay.
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Old 02-27-2011, 01:42 PM   #50
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I didn't know that any sump pumps operate on a timer but if they did, then certain conditions can result in unnecessarily short on off cycles. If that model of pump is not adversely affected by short cycles then that is okay.
If you have a tethered float, that float has a metal ball inside that acts like a relay switch. The pump is activated when the float is at an angle (based on the water level) such that the metal ball falls backwards and completes the circuit that activates the pump.

Once the water level starts to drop, the ball slides the opposite way. In fact, it's probably not a timer, but just a simple relay switch that opens and closes depending on the position of the ball which depends on the water level in the pit.
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Old 01-13-2016, 11:22 AM   #51
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Sump Pump Run alot


I have a sump pump question.
I purchased a 10 year old home with a finished basement. There are no signs that there has ever been any water leakage. My sump basin contains 2 Wayne sump pumps, one 3/4hp and one 1hp.
Because they're located under the bedroom, I noticed that the pump cycles for about 4-5 seconds every 5 minutes. When I looked in the pit I noticed that the weep tube had a pretty good flow, indicating to me at least, that the drain tile was doing what it was supposed to be doing.
Just to see how high it would go, I switched off the pumps and let it fill up. The basin filled another 3 inches, then stopped. It is about 6 inches from the top of the basin and covers about half of the weep tube opening.
My question is, Can I leave it at this level and adjust my sump float, or could this create more pressure and create another problem.
In the spring I'll check the discharge pipe to make sure that the water isn't just circulating the water back to the drain tile, but for now I just would like to quiet the pumps.
Thanks
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:42 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMGINSUGARGROVE View Post
I have a sump pump question.
I purchased a 10 year old home with a finished basement. There are no signs that there has ever been any water leakage. My sump basin contains 2 Wayne sump pumps, one 3/4hp and one 1hp.
Because they're located under the bedroom, I noticed that the pump cycles for about 4-5 seconds every 5 minutes. When I looked in the pit I noticed that the weep tube had a pretty good flow, indicating to me at least, that the drain tile was doing what it was supposed to be doing.
Just to see how high it would go, I switched off the pumps and let it fill up. The basin filled another 3 inches, then stopped. It is about 6 inches from the top of the basin and covers about half of the weep tube opening.
My question is, Can I leave it at this level and adjust my sump float, or could this create more pressure and create another problem.
In the spring I'll check the discharge pipe to make sure that the water isn't just circulating the water back to the drain tile, but for now I just would like to quiet the pumps.
Thanks
My gut tells me that it's not a good thing that your pump is running every 5 min. What is the source of the water?

Your pit is filling up to a certain level until it stops because the drain tile is starting to fill up. On the other end of that pipe, depending on which side has more head (e.g height) the water could leak out at the opposite location.
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Old 01-14-2016, 07:46 AM   #53
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The pit fills up to a certain level and then stops (stabllizes) because that is where the water table is. For starters you can set the pump turn on level a little higher and the pump will rest for long periods of time (good).

But that stabilizing level can change depending on rainfall and also whether there is a long wet spell or a long dry spell.

Also, if the stabilizing happens only after the drain pipe ends are mostly or fully covered, you will change the hydraulic dynamics of the entire perimeter drain system (resaturate the soil all around the foundation to a higher level). It is possible to get seepage up onto the floor at the opposite side of the basement even when the pit did not overflow.

Should water get up onto the floor you will need to put the pump turn on level back down and let the pump run and maintain the level below the drain pipe openings for two whole days xxxx correction seven whole days before drawing conclusions that something else is wrong. After that you can experiment with the pump float levels again.

It is important that storm water and gutter water not accumulate near the foundation. Do not trench or excavate around the foundation to put in a layer of gravel or mulch for landscaping.

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Last edited by AllanJ; 01-14-2016 at 08:06 AM.
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