Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-03-2009, 01:05 AM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by de12 View Post
Should the sump pump pit always contain certain level water? I noticed that the sump pump pit has water always keep the same doesn't matter how often the sump pump pump out the water. Even there is no rain, the sump pump is still keep pump out the water in every minute. But if I turn the power off to stop the sump pump running, the water level in the pit seems increase slowly (maybe fill up the pit about two day). I have a "SSP-1000 1HP sump pump w/microswitch" installed and there is no way to adjust the switch.

Should I worry about it? Anyone have any idea or suggestion? Thanks in advance.
answer:there is a water table under everyones home--
if you have a high water table under your home--
water will come into your drain tile and still fill the pit--
in my experience it happens when your home is the low one--
in your block or in the area--thats why it is always good to be on a hill--that way your neighbor will get the water--and you wont--
another reason is that the grading of dirt or grass outside your house is tilting toward your house--it should tilt away from your house--that also applys to your water coming off your gutters-always get water at least 10 feet away from the house

coocoobe101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 06:39 AM   #17
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,279
Rewards Points: 2,136
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


The turn on level for your pump may be set as close as 4 inches to the bottom of the slab. Most people set the float to turn the pump on when the water is about 6 inches from the bottom of the slab. The pump turns off when the water has dropped about 8 or 10 inches from the high water level. For an 18 inch deep sump (pretty common), the pump turns on about 12 or 14 inches above the floor, and turns off about 4 inches above the floor. The set points are adjusted by setting the float switch appropriately, I have never seen a non-adjustable float switch, but it sounds like one of the posters had one, so I guess they exist. The key point is that you should never run the pump dry (previously noted), and there is no need to keep pumping if the static water level will not rise any closer than 4 inches to the slab. Pumping costs you money in terms of electricity and wear on your pump, no need to do it unnecessarily.
Daniel Holzman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 09:39 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,970
Rewards Points: 2,036
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by handy man88 View Post
You probably want to keep the water below the drain tile.
I'm not convinced yet.

The perimeter drain system and sump pump create an artificial water table under the house that is lower than the natural water table. If the natural water table is above basement floor level then the system must do this.

If during dry weather the pit sits partially full then the natural water table is below floor level but could be above drain tile level while the pump sits idle. You can optionally set the pump to come on at lower levels and create an artificial water table below drain tile level but here the pump will be working more of the time.

As far as dampness in the basement caused by water slowly evaporating from the pit goes, the same amount of evaporation takes place whether the water is 4 inches deep or 24 inches deep.
__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.

Last edited by AllanJ; 11-03-2009 at 09:41 AM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 06:40 PM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


I have never seen water coming from the drain tile pipes. The water is coming quickly from the bottom of the pit which apparently has holes. I can see some bubbling at the surface of the water while it is going up. The rise will slow at about 10", and eventually stop at 13" right below the drain tile pipes.

This happens when we get rain, the sump pump will cycle about 4 times in a minute. Otherwise, depending on the season, it could cycle anywhere from couple times in an hour to far apart in a week in dry conditions.

I don't mind having water in the pit at 13" instead of 3". My concern is the hydrostatic pressure and the damage that would result to the slab or the footing of the house. I have also seen in another house moisture at the joint of the slab and foundation walls from having a sump pump set too high.

It sounds like that it might be fine let the water rise half way in the pit, at about 12" from the bottom of the pit, that would leave the water below the drain tile pipes and at 12" from the top of the pit.
emre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 10:46 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by coocoobe101 View Post
its a good idea to have some water in your pit--
you never want to suck out the crap thats there at the bottom--
i have seen many pumps have their impellers stuck--
from a rock or other solid object--
i recommend installing it on a 3inch high brick about 9inches wide
make sure the vibration from the pump--
does not move off of the brick--thats what you want to do--
The inlets to the pump are typically at least 1" off the ground.

Elevating your pump is generally restricted by the height at which your float initiates your pump. This is especially important if you have a tethered float vice a vertical float.

Last edited by handy man88; 11-03-2009 at 10:48 PM.
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 11:30 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,970
Rewards Points: 2,036
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by emre View Post
I don't mind having water in the pit at 13" instead of 3". My concern is the hydrostatic pressure and the damage that would result to the slab or the footing of the house. I have also seen in another house moisture at the joint of the slab and foundation walls from having a sump pump set too high..
The water table in dirt may be different from the water table in air (the water level in the pit) due to capillary action (wicking). So in that other house, the pit level might have to be maintained several inches below floor level to avoid seeing moisture at floor level elsewhere in the basement.

Also depending on the kind of dirt (clay, sand, etc.) the water table could be higher at one end of the house compared with the other. This may require running the sump pump more to depress the water table in the vicinity of the pit and hope the water table at the other end of the house goes down far enough too.
__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 12:14 PM   #22
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


hi--water seems to always be a problem no matter where you live--
in its simplest terms--water should be routed as far away from your home as possible---builders have used drain tile to route
water into your sump pump basin from around the house--
it is then re-routed to a location as far from the house as you can
with a sump pump-- as for how much water should be left in the basin is not a big deal--common sense rules-there are a few things you can do to slow down this process----proper soil grading around your house
should be angled at 20-30 degrees going away from your house--
having enough down spouts to handle rain flow is a good idea--
down spouts should be routed into drain tile and exited as far from the house as possible--again get the water around your home
OUT--OUT--OUT as far as you can--
coocoobe101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 02:03 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,970
Rewards Points: 2,036
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by coocoobe101 View Post
... down spouts should be routed into drain tile and exited as far from the house as possible----
But not into the same drain tile runs that feed into the sump pump pit (the sump) relying on the pump to get the water up and away.
__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 10:52 PM   #24
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


hi allan
you are absolutely correct
separate drain beginning at the downspout running away from the house
i guess i should have been more specific
i just worked at a house in which one corner downspout was connected outside and joined to the sump pump discharge line--and 4" draintile carried the water away from the house--the old 2 in 1-----Artie
coocoobe101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 07:01 PM   #25
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Hi there

I also want to know about the correct water level setting. I have two drain pipes going into the pit, one is an inch or so higher than the other. I just moved into this house from the city (so I'm not used to these things) and the pump's current setting (I believe it's called a tethered float - two floats one high and one low for on and off) has the pump turning on when the water is about five inches from the top of the basement floor. One drain pipe is completely submerged at this point and the other is about 1/4 filled.

Should I set the pump to allow the drain water never to get submerged? If it is submerged, isn't the water that's supposed to be pumped out essentially being sent back along into the pipe causing a bit of a backup? When the pump gets rid of the water, the drain pipe that was submerged dribbles water out consistently only to eventually fill the pit again. Being winter and everything frozen, it doesn't fill as fast, but in the summer, it was running quite a bit.

BTW this setting was not what the previous homeowner had it at. That pump burned out when I bought the house and they had a spare ready to go. So, I just kinda dropped it in as it was (and it's raised on a brick).

Thanks!
Mike
Mike Soloway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 08:21 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Soloway View Post
Hi there

I also want to know about the correct water level setting. I have two drain pipes going into the pit, one is an inch or so higher than the other. I just moved into this house from the city (so I'm not used to these things) and the pump's current setting (I believe it's called a tethered float - two floats one high and one low for on and off) has the pump turning on when the water is about five inches from the top of the basement floor. One drain pipe is completely submerged at this point and the other is about 1/4 filled.

Should I set the pump to allow the drain water never to get submerged? If it is submerged, isn't the water that's supposed to be pumped out essentially being sent back along into the pipe causing a bit of a backup? When the pump gets rid of the water, the drain pipe that was submerged dribbles water out consistently only to eventually fill the pit again. Being winter and everything frozen, it doesn't fill as fast, but in the summer, it was running quite a bit.

BTW this setting was not what the previous homeowner had it at. That pump burned out when I bought the house and they had a spare ready to go. So, I just kinda dropped it in as it was (and it's raised on a brick).

Thanks!
Mike
Sump pumps with tethered floats aren't meant to be adjusted, even though they can be.

If you want a shorter water height depth at which the pump turns on, you might want to consider a vertical float sump pump. I believe for the flowmaster, the tethered trips at 14" while the vertical trips at 8".

In any case, after the water is pumped out, the residual water that runs into the pit is probably what was in the corrugated pipe as the pit filled.

The rule of thumb generally is to set the float to trip right before the drain pipes start fillingj/backing up. That allows the water to be evacuated ASAP.

Sump pumps generally trip and pump based on a timer...not based on how much water is left in the pit.
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 09:34 PM   #27
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Thanks for the quick reply.

So basically...having one and 1/4 of my drain pipes submerged is not such a good thing...
Mike Soloway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 09:59 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Freeport, ME USA
Posts: 120
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Well I am going to jump into this after resisting as long as I could I have lived in the "country" my whole life, as long as the water level under your slab/in your sump pit stays below the bottom of the slab level I would not consider it to be a problem. Your drain lines can be submerged or partially under or all out, it really does not matter.

The sump pump should be adjusted and run to keep the water at that level. The main purpose for sump pumps is to keep the water table in the soil below your house from rising up to the point where your cellar floor gets wet. In a "perfect" world you would have a sump pit but it would be connected to a drain line that allows for any water to be drained away by gravity to a lower point outside on your property.

The lower you pump your pit the more the pump will run. If your pit will reach equilibrium with out running the pump except for rain events then let the water sit there.
meboatermike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 10:33 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Soloway View Post
Thanks for the quick reply.

So basically...having one and 1/4 of my drain pipes submerged is not such a good thing...
I don't think this would cause harm depending on the rainstorm or how much water is getting in, but generally speaking, you want to get rid of any water as soon as possible. What is the benefit ever of having standing water? There is none.

It'd be interesting to know where is the inlet for the one drain pipe that fills first. Once that pipe is full, there could be a backup somewhere as the 2nd pipe starts to fill.

It's interesting that they don't fill at the same rate, so that means the 2nd pipe probably has a higher inlet height.
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 10:44 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Sump pump pit water level --- problem


If you live in a high water table area such as I do you can pump 24x7 & never get rid of all the ground water

So it depends upon the area & setup

One house as a kid there was an underground stream
They poured a cement floor......it flooded
So they built another floor about 2' up
There was constant water between the 2 floors

So again....multiple pumps could be run 24x7 & you would never get rid of the water

Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sewer gas smell in basement from sump pump mirage212 Plumbing 15 10-23-2008 07:09 PM
Sump pump pit water level Ralph123 Building & Construction 6 07-24-2008 06:33 AM
Is 1/2 Pex more restrictive than 1/2 copper? twilightcall Plumbing 19 06-24-2008 08:32 AM
Sump Inlet Under Water Table sumpbum Plumbing 6 03-19-2008 09:41 AM
Sump pit filling with water in dry weather dimitar Building & Construction 13 12-19-2007 12:59 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.