Sump Pump Drainage And Other Flow Problems - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-23-2011, 04:16 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


Hello everyone,

I hope that you're having a good day so far. And I guess I better say, "GO CATS!! BEAT THE BUCKEYES!!". Had to get that out.

I have a basement sump pump that is pumping lots of water out. After the plumber had to redirect the sump pump line to the other side of my house, he said that I probably was living on a spring. Anyway--now the sump pump works well but it's dumping all of the water into my yard.


Anyway--it has turned it into a swamp. I have been thinking about digging up the not very deeply buried pvc pipe and cutting it off where it comes out of my house. I would then redirect the pipe to a rain barrell. What do you think and is that even legal? My neighbor and I have a mess in our hands and we need to do something to help with this.

Secondly, there is something go on with the front line into my house. I lose considerable water pressure when I flush the toilet in the guest bathroom right across from the kitchen. When that flushes and I turn on the kitchen sink, the amount of pressure reduces. There also seems to be a ton of air in the lines when I turn on the kitchen sink. It spurts and sputters every once in a while. The home is almost 7 years old.

The last thing is that the back water spiggot (which I cannot use in conjunction with the front spiggot at the same time) is leaking into my basement when it's turned on. Is there something to look for when I go to the basement to look for the source?

Thanks and sorry for the long post.

Jesse in Lexington, KY

Advertisement


Last edited by loomis1228; 03-23-2011 at 08:01 PM. Reason: added pics
loomis1228 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 05:24 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,834
Rewards Points: 1,182
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


Well, not necessarily in order, but starting with the easiest, you need to grade the soil so that the water at your back spiggot flows away from the house, and/or add a splash guard, which you can buy at a big box or garden shop. If the water from your sump pump is saturating that much lawn, I cannot imagine a rain barrel providing nearly enough relief. Do you have any natural terrain to which the water could be directed, in order to flow downhill, away from yours and the neighbors homes? In regard to water pressure, perhaps it is connected to the excess water in your basement, i.e. a broken water line. Call your plumber back, or your municipality, and have them check it.

Advertisement

DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 08:07 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


Quote:
Originally Posted by DexterII View Post
Well, not necessarily in order, but starting with the easiest, you need to grade the soil so that the water at your back spiggot flows away from the house, and/or add a splash guard, which you can buy at a big box or garden shop. If the water from your sump pump is saturating that much lawn, I cannot imagine a rain barrel providing nearly enough relief. Do you have any natural terrain to which the water could be directed, in order to flow downhill, away from yours and the neighbors homes? In regard to water pressure, perhaps it is connected to the excess water in your basement, i.e. a broken water line. Call your plumber back, or your municipality, and have them check it.
Thanks for your reply, Dexter. I have added pictures above but the pictures just don't do the problem justice. The wet spot is well over 5 feet long and probably 5-6 feet wide. The spot never dries. I have asked about digging a well and adding gravel but they don't think that would help much. The water just pools. I've looked at doing a french drain but I don't know.

I've contacted the water company and they have checked the pressure outside and find it very much on point at the main line. I just need to call a plumber.

Thanks for your help.
loomis1228 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 09:08 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,976
Rewards Points: 2,048
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


Is that white pipe next to the gutter downspout the sump pump outlet? That needs to end somewhere away from the foundation. YOu do not want water pooling or poured out against the foundation.

The water still has to go somewhere. Are you sure that the water you are pumping into the back yard is not percolating through the soil and coming back into the sump pump pit to be repumped?

Where had the sump pump used to send the water?

I doubt if a French drain would help; it needs to empty out somewhere else perhaps using another sump pump. I might have suggested an underground pit (a dry well) some distance from your house but it too could fill up and the water make its way underground back to your basement.
__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.

Last edited by AllanJ; 03-24-2011 at 09:13 AM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 02:08 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Near Philly
Posts: 2,051
Rewards Points: 1,022
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


Can you pipe it out to the street?
bob22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 05:18 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sump Pump drainage and other flow problems


The white pipe coming out of the house--next to the down spout--is the sump pump line. The line goes into the ground and then runs about 10 feet into my front yard. According to code, we cannot pump the water into the street because of "freezing" hazards and concerns. The sump pump used to send the water on the other side of the house, just into the ground with no drainage. The water would seep back into the foundation and recycle via the sump pump over and over and over and over....finally it wore a sump pump out. The city had a policy that said that if the direction of the sump pump dumping was incorrect because of the builder doing so, they would redirect it and replace the sump pump for free. So up at the top, you see the pool of soggy stuff. That's where the sump pump dumps at. The pipe is buried about 3" under the ground and the end of the pipe is exposed.

Advertisement

loomis1228 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts