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Old 09-01-2012, 05:44 PM   #1
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Can the water level resting point in the tank be slightly higher than the bottom of the intake pipe?

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Old 09-01-2012, 05:49 PM   #2
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Can it be sure, should it be no.

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Old 09-01-2012, 06:36 PM   #3
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If you are in a high water table area--Yes---

Kind of scary to have so little reserve area,but if that's where the water table is then set your float at that level---

I often use pedestal pumps in pits with a high water table---the floats are easy to 'fine tune' in a situation like that.
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:35 PM   #4
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Or make a deeper pit.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:48 PM   #5
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The same thing is happening to me but was never an issue for the first 4 yrs. In the house. My house was built in 2007.

I noticed a damp smell in the basement near my utility closet, which is where my sump is. I removed the sealed cover and to my amazement it was almost full but not to the point that the pump should have engaged.

I ran the pump and the pit emptied out fine. I filled the pit with water using a garden hose and the pump turned on and emptied as is should have so I thought no worries.

That started 8 months ago, it was spring then. Now everyday the sump pit is full to just above the inlet pipe. My neighbors sump pit is bone dry. His sump pit is just shy of 100 ft. from mine. I am at the bottom of a small hill and there are a couple of houses that drain into my yard. The swell for my street runs through my backyard. The swell is at least 30 ft. from my foundation and the grading away from my foundation is good.

This area has not had more rain than normal this year, again, this had not been a problem the first 4 yrs I lived here; at least I never noticed the damp smell until now.

This is what I did for troubleshooting:

Turned off the main to the house for about 8 hrs but the sump pit continued to fill.
Turned off the irrigation thinking it could be a broken pipe leaking against the foundation. The sump pit still fills.
Contacted the water company to run a leak check. They said no leaks.
Had the water company check my water usage looking for a spike but they said my usage was on par as it has been historically.

I'm not sure what else to check. It doesn't appear there is a leak.

Could it just be the ground water level?

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Old 10-27-2012, 04:03 PM   #6
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The float is used to set the on/off point for the pump. The elevation of the collector pipe leading into the sump pit is irrelevant to the process of deciding what levels to use to turn the pump on and off.

The purpose of the sump pit is to keep the floor of the basement dry. The turn on point for the pump is typically set approximately 4-6 inches lower than the floor elevation. The pump turnoff elevation is typically set about three inches above the intake for the pump. This prevents the pump from running the pit dry, which can be bad for the pump, since the pumped water typically helps to cool the pump (this is true for submersibles). The depth of the pit is typically selected so you get a reasonable runtime for the pump, which is typically at least a minute per cycle. Runtime will depend on the diameter of the pit, and the drawdown distance between the pump on and pump off points set by the float.
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Old 10-27-2012, 04:06 PM   #7
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Yeah I'm good with that. What I'm concerned about is why the pit keep filling up to that level every 24 hrs. There hasn't been enough rain and it's been going for a long time.

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Old 10-27-2012, 06:48 PM   #8
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That is the ground water level----mother nature---I bet if you dug a post hole out side of the house---you would run into water at the exact same level-----
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:29 PM   #9
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That's what I'm hoping Mike. Just seems odd that my neighbor is not having this problem.

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Old 10-27-2012, 07:51 PM   #10
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a lot of issues can affect the flow of water ..... ground water will typically follow the slope of the land when flowing down a hill

nearby construction that occurred after your home was constructed can change the way ground water flows, this includes homes/foundation as well as streets or underground utilities.

if the homes uphill of you were built after yours then their roof produce more run-off than the same patch of grass would, and of course if they have sumps ....

drainage engineering can be a tricky item ....

Good luck!

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