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Old 05-28-2012, 04:04 PM   #16
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stubbing out hotwater heater?


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Thanks rjniles - I've never worked with the corrugated flex lines - is that available in the box stores?
I get them at a plumbing supply but I have seen them at Home Depot. Home Depot does not carry them in as many different lengths.

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Old 05-29-2012, 11:13 AM   #17
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stubbing out hotwater heater?


another question on the drain pan - can I use a black poly pipe to carry this drain line to the sump pit in my crawl space? It's probably 40 or 50' from tank to sump, and I have some free stuff (1 1/4") coiled up that someone donated a while ago - and maybe even a couple leftover threaded poly fittings - maybe I can hook this right up to the pan. I'd have to figure out how to hook in the t&p drain as per EPlumber's advice - maybe an ABS tee first at the pan to accommodate the t&p, then all poly from there...? This would be really easy. Any thoughts?
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Old 05-29-2012, 02:18 PM   #18
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In my area that would be fine. We are not required to do anything with the TP valve other that stub it down to the drip pan. You are may require something different as eplumber suggests.
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:06 PM   #19
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stubbing out hotwater heater?


I bought my water heater - ended up with a bottom inlet model. My water feed with valve is up above the tank height. I guess my planning sucks.

Anyway, I'm thinking I'll plumb the bottom inlet up to @ the top height of the tank with 3/4" copper pipe, threaded connection on top, and just treat it like it's a top located nipple. And use flex connector from there to the inlet / valve.

Is that enough to stabilize this pipe (solid at the bottom but it would only be held at the top by a flex connector). Or should I make this a solid connection with copper pipe all the way to the valve? Or move the feed / valve in the wall?
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:56 PM   #20
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You do not need an expansion tank with a well pump system- your pump expansion tank performs the same purpose.
the FAQ's on my tank:

As part of the redesign of our water heaters to meet the 2004 Natural Resources Canada energy efficiency standard, GSW has added heat traps to the cold water inlet and the hot water outlet on most of our products. These thermoplastic devices are designed to reduce stand-by heat loss from water heaters. GSW heat traps have a tadpole design.

The tadpole in the cold water inlet heat trap (blue) is lighter than water. As cold water is drawn into the tank, it is pushed down, it then floats up to reseat when water flow stops. It is furnished as a dip tube assembly.

A heavier-than-water tadpole in the heat trap for the hot water outlet (pink) is pushed up when hot water is drawn from the tank, and then sinks to reseat in the absence of water flow.

Each heat trap fitting features safety relief ports to prevent accidental closure of the waterway. In addition, these plastic lined galvanized steel nipples create a dielectric waterway that prevents galvanic action between dissimilar metals.


I interpret this to mean that water won't flow when there's no fixture in use, which implies pressure can build in the tank. But then they talk about safety relief ports in the heat traps, which tells me pressure can't build up in the tank. So now I'm confused. Does the heat trap just help stop the water in the tank from "mixing" with water in the pipes near the tank, but still allowing pressure to release (to an expansion tank, or in my case, the bladder tank?).

Thanks for the patience in helping me understand this. It's pretty cool stuff...

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