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Old 01-14-2010, 08:16 PM   #1
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


I've gutted my master bathroom. Repairs have been made to the subfloor, and now it's time to start rebuilding. I'm going to be hanging drywall, but of course I want to remove the stop valves for the sink (hot and cold) and the toilet so I can slip drywall over those pipes and then install nice new valves. I have to turn off the water to the house, of course, to remove those stop valves. What do most people do here? One idea I had was to cap off the supply pipes with a compression plug so I can turn water back on to the house and take my time with the drywall, etc, before I need to install new valves. But that meant I had to buy like $45 worth of brass compression fittings (a coupler and a plug for each supply pipe). I don't like this idea. What I really want to know is what do most people do? Do I just turn off the water, take off the valves (leaving on the ferrule, of course), put up that piece of drywall (which will take me forever, since I'm a first time drywaller), and then install the new valves and turn the water back on before I move on to finish drywalling, and then mudding/taping the rest of the bathroom?

Also, when installing a compression fit valve on copper pipe, do I use teflon tape on the threads?

Thanks in advance for any advice.

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Old 01-14-2010, 08:25 PM   #2
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


You could MAYBE use some sealent to seal the pipes shut, but I'm not sure if that would actually witstand pressure, but maybe it would at least last long enough for you to go turn on the water when you need it, then turn it back off.

I THINK this is the stuff I've used for sealing cleanouts and such and it works nice:

http://www.dowcorning.com/applicatio...t.aspx?R=396EN

I'm pretty sure it would be able to work as a temp measure, but maybe someone else can confirm.

Though you could just keep the water off, even as a first time drywaller I'm sure it wont take more then an hour to at least hang the part where the water pipe is, then just proceed to readd the valves right away before hanging the rest.

Oh and whatever you do, don't get that stuff on your hands. If you do, let it dry and don't do the mistake I did and try to clean it off with water. I have nice red laundry faucets now though!


Last edited by Red Squirrel; 01-14-2010 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:36 PM   #3
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


Steve,
I run into this all the time when doing kitchen installs. You didn't say but I am thinking you are dealing with 1/2" copper pipes. Take off your stops, cut off the copper clean and solder a cap on the end. Make sure you have 3-4" of copper sticking out. After drywall, just cut off the caps and install new stops with compression fittings, no teflon tape needed. Don't forget to put on your escutcheons on the pipes before you put on the stops.
Or you can turn some matching wooden ones on a lathe....I did make one for the waste line too, but not before these pics were taken.
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:40 PM   #4
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


I don't have 3 to 4 inches of copper sticking out. There are old stop valves currently on there, and with the escutcheon, they are flush with the wall as it is. So, if I cut any pipe off at all, I'm going to come up short to install the new valves, I think.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:06 PM   #5
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


Oh shoot, I just realized that of course, if I don't cut the pipe and get the compression ring off, I'll never be able to get the escutcheon off obviously, which defeats the purpose of doing this altogether, because I can't cut a hole the size of the pipe and then fit it over the pipe. Shoot. I guess I'll have to learn how to sweat copper pipe, or call a professional for this mess! My concern is the toilet supply pipe - the others are about 12 inches off the floor, so I have plenty of pipe there to work with. The toilet one is only about 4 inches off. If I mess that one up, there's not much pipe there to work with!
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:09 PM   #6
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


REMOVE YOUR VALVES THEN INSTALL THESE SHARKBITE ENDCAPS
THEY USE A SMALL PLASTIC TOOL TO REMAVE THEM AFTER ALL YOUR WALL WORK COMPLETE THEN REINSTALL NEW STOPS ON EXISTING
COMPRESSION NUTS

http://www.cashacme.com/prod_sharkbite_pushfit.php
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:33 PM   #7
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


Quote:
Originally Posted by MACPLUMB View Post
REMOVE YOUR VALVES THEN INSTALL THESE SHARKBITE ENDCAPS
THEY USE A SMALL PLASTIC TOOL TO REMAVE THEM AFTER ALL YOUR WALL WORK COMPLETE THEN REINSTALL NEW STOPS ON EXISTING
COMPRESSION NUTS

http://www.cashacme.com/prod_sharkbite_pushfit.php

Actually you dont need a special tool. For 1/2" copper you can just use a 5/8" open end wrench to release the fitting or just use an adjustable wrench set to the thickenss of the pipe and push it against the plastic part of the valve.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:34 PM   #8
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


But I still won't be able to get the escutcheon off to put the drywall on without cutting off the existing compression nuts, right?
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:25 PM   #9
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


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But I still won't be able to get the escutcheon off to put the drywall on without cutting off the existing compression nuts, right?
Riiiiiight.. Steve, if you are not familiar with sweating copper, call a plumber in to clean up your plumbing while you've got the walls open. Simple job for him. Plus, he may find something you overlooked and save you from future headaches.
Mike Hawkins
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:58 PM   #10
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


I'm renovating two baths in my home currently and I've capped the water lines in both with sharkbites while I finish out.. great product for this purpose. I would have loved to had 3-4" of copper but no luck. I cut the copper directly behind the compression ring and capped with the sharkbites. I have used tin snips or whatever works to cut off the escutcheon depending on the material of the escutcheon. You don't need much copper extending out of the wall to install the new valve, however, if you don't think there is enough, you'll need to sweat some new plumbing to extend the lines (or use sharkbite fittings in lieu of sweating the copper). But like firehawkph said, if it's necessary and you're not a "sweater," call a plumber and let him clean it up, shouldn't cost much at all for a job that simple.
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Old 01-16-2010, 09:41 AM   #11
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


Being as the area in question is seldom really seen, why not leave the valves on, cut the drywall to fit over your existing escutcheons, hang the drywall and finish it out with compound? I believe once finished and painted properly, no one will notice. Just my thought on this, David
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Old 01-17-2010, 05:52 PM   #12
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Stop valves in bathroom while drywalling


knock the drywall off around pipes then cut them off inside wall .sweat a chunk of copper on there with a coupling sticking out around 5-6" outside finished wall then sweat a cap on it.once youre done drywalling cutthem off to length you need

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