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-   -   Sprinkler Backflow Valve Replacement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/sprinkler-backflow-valve-replacement-99113/)

Ryetsu 03-21-2011 06:02 PM

Sprinkler Backflow Valve Replacement
 
Hello all,

Could someone please explain to me how I can remove the bottom valve from my sprinkler backflow preventer? It has cracked from a deep freeze this winter and I can't for the life of me get it off.

Please see attached pictures:

Entire setup: https://sites.google.com/site/ryetsu/test/IMAG0073.jpg
Cracked Valve: https://sites.google.com/site/ryetsu/test/IMAG0074.jpg

Thanks much for any assistance!

Dougtheplumber 03-21-2011 06:11 PM

You will have to cut the copper pipe(looks like this has happened before because of the coupling), remove the blue handled ball valve, remove the vacuum breaker and then the problem valve can be replaced. Reinstall all of the components and then install another coupling.

Homerepairguy 03-21-2011 06:28 PM

DougThePlumber gave you some good advice. I would take it a step further.

I would cut the left pipe just below the coupling and install a union coupling there. Also install a union coupling on the right pipe just above the elbow. Then re-fabricate the upper assembly to fit on top of the two union couplings. If you ever need to do repairs in the future, it would be simple to just remove the entire assembly using the two union couplings.

If you do that, insure that there is no electrical ground wire attached to the output pipes. If there is, then buy two ground wire clamps and jumper across the two union couplings just below both.

HRG

the_man 03-21-2011 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homerepairguy (Post 614125)
If you do that, insure that there is no electrical ground wire attached to the output pipes. If there is, then buy two ground wire clamps and jumper across the two union couplings just below both.
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doubt there will be any grounding problems, and a jumper is only required for a dielectric union. all you need is a sweat union on both sides (brass or copper), dielectric is only needed for joining dissimilar metals. it'll probably stand up to the weather better too :thumbsup:

Homerepairguy 03-21-2011 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the_man (Post 614236)
doubt there will be any grounding problems, and a jumper is only required for a dielectric union. all you need is a sweat union on both sides (brass or copper), dielectric is only needed for joining dissimilar metals. it'll probably stand up to the weather better too :thumbsup:

Totally agree that there probably won't be any grounding problems, especially since the output is connected to a sprinkler system. Was just trying to cover all of the bases "just in case".

There's no telling how things might be connected now or in the future. Like maybe connect a ground wire from a ham radio antenna to a "convenient" copper pipe which happens to be part of the sprinkler system where timer valves are located.

The electrical ground for our home is connected to a copper pipe for an outside water faucet that happens to be below the electric meter where the A/C power cable comes from the telephone post. When I installed two union couplings on the main water line from the city for our shut off ball valve and a pressure regulator (which are on the opposite side of the house), I installed two ground clamps and jumpered across the union couplings. Since the couplings are not soldered, and the connections to the ball valve and pressure regulator are not soldered either, I felt one connection could develop a high resistance connection and cause a safety hazzard. Then all of the ground connections for our entire house would have been compromised. Just didn't want to take a chance and the ground clamps and heavy wire were so cheap.

Thanks,
HRG


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