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-   -   Sewage pit OR Sump Pit?!?! (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/sewage-pit-sump-pit-158827/)

tom847 10-03-2012 10:11 AM

Sewage pit OR Sump Pit?!?!
 
Hi All,

I have two pits in my basement. One that i know is a sump pit becuase it has a corregated tube infeed and its routed directly outside, pretty simple. The other pit i have is in the laundry area on the other side of the basement. It is roughly 22" deep by 20" diameter and it has no pipe infeed, but it is tied into the above ground (20") sewer line and it has a vent. Even the cover on this pit looks like a sewage pit becuase its air tight. There is a condensate drain within 6 feet of it used by the evaporator and hot water needed, but i dont see that drain tied into this pit. that is the only drain in the basement.

This basement has no bathrooms or sinks. I want to add a full bathroom so im not sure if i can use this pit as a sewage pit. The house is about 20 years old.

any thoughts?

thanks in advance

Jackofall1 10-03-2012 10:26 AM

Hello Tom and welcome the best darn DIY'r site on the web.

First question are you still on a septic system?

Is there a pump in the pit that you are talking about?

If yes what kind of pump?

Have you taken the lid off to see whats inside.

20" sewer line? sounds a bit large to me.

Mark

tom847 10-03-2012 01:01 PM

sorry, need to clarify.

I am tied into a city sewer line. yes there is a pump in the pit, its so old and dirty i can barely tell its a pump. i havent pulled it out yet, but it looks like a small sump pump. the little water in this pit is crystal clear.
the sewer line is 6" OD and its about 18" above the slab where this pump ties into.

Jackofall1 10-03-2012 01:12 PM

Certainly sounds like a sewage pit that is no longer used, for sewage you need to have what is known as a chopper pump or grinder pump, I would be only guessing at what is existing. I would certainly be wearing gloves when you do pull that one out.

Edit...I was just checking out pricing on those pumps, you might want to see if that pump is operational and is actually a pump suitable for sewage, new ones start at over $1K

Mark

tom847 10-03-2012 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 1022992)
Certainly sounds like a sewage pit that is no longer used, for sewage you need to have what is known as a chopper pump or grinder pump, I would be only guessing at what is existing. I would certainly be wearing gloves when you do pull that one out.

Edit...I was just checking out pricing on those pumps, you might want to see if that pump is operational and is actually a pump suitable for sewage, new ones start at over $1K

Mark


Well heres the deal. this pit has not be touched since it the house was built. I can tell by the construction and that there are no bathrooms or sinks in the basement. the washer drains directly into the sewer line.

Im thinking the pit was built and plumbed to be used at some point as a sewege pit, but then why is the pit small (same size as the sump pit) and it has no sewage infeed hole? is that just the way the builders build them?

I dont think i can use this basin for sewage with its small size and would have to dig and add a larger pit with a port for a 3" line.

You can get plenty of ejector pumps for $200-$300.

Jackofall1 10-03-2012 02:10 PM

I would say its big enough, that pit holds about 34 gallons less the pump displacement of say 1/3 of the total volume = 23 gallons. Average gallons per flush 1.6 + a shower running at 2 gpm + a sink running at 2 gpm = total flow of say 6 gpm. Pit fill time 3 minutes with all running.

Wouldn't you think that would be enough with say a pump capacity of 10 GPM.

Mark

tom847 10-03-2012 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 1023036)
I would say its big enough, that pit holds about 34 gallons less the pump displacement of say 1/3 of the total volume = 23 gallons. Average gallons per flush 1.6 + a shower running at 2 gpm + a sink running at 2 gpm = total flow of say 6 gpm. Pit fill time 3 minutes with all running.

Wouldn't you think that would be enough with say a pump capacity of 10 GPM.

Mark

yeah im sure it will work fine, but am not sure if that would be per code.

whats the difference between a ejector pump and a grinder pump? just a bigger better impeller that can handle more foreign objects?

thanks.

PlumbDumb 10-03-2012 06:40 PM

Tom,

If your thinking of adding a full bath to your basement, your best bet is to install a new sewer ejector barrel. This is a ~22 gallon plastic tank that includes a new pump inside the sealed barrel, with connections for vent, pump to sewer, and waste water from the bathroom that you will bury below the slab.

Using an old pump may save some cost up-front. But when you get covered in S*** changing it 2 months after the bathroom is open for "business" (and spending around $150 for a new pump anyway), the $250 differential seems worth it.

If you have a licensed plumber change it, he will charge you $250 in labor, so you brake even.

tom847 10-04-2012 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PlumbDumb (Post 1023215)
Tom,

If your thinking of adding a full bath to your basement, your best bet is to install a new sewer ejector barrel. This is a ~22 gallon plastic tank that includes a new pump inside the sealed barrel, with connections for vent, pump to sewer, and waste water from the bathroom that you will bury below the slab.

Using an old pump may save some cost up-front. But when you get covered in S*** changing it 2 months after the bathroom is open for "business" (and spending around $150 for a new pump anyway), the $250 differential seems worth it.

If you have a licensed plumber change it, he will charge you $250 in labor, so you brake even.

I missed seeing that the ac evaporator & hot water heater drain actually ties into this pit, not sure if that makes a difference for using the same pit as a sewege pit. I dont see why.

The pit itself is in good shape and i would get a new zoeller sewege pump which would tie into the existing vent and discharge line, so why the new basin? If i get a new basin, which i saw when at home depot, id have to break more concrete to expand and deepen the hole just to add a couple inches.

Jackofall1 10-04-2012 11:30 AM

Personally I wouldn't add anything more than a new pump, the original design of the pit as stated was intended for a sewage pit, add a new pump and build your bathroom. There are plenty of basement waste pits just like the one you described in use today and will be for years to come.

Mark


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