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theedudenator 07-23-2013 12:04 PM

Septic System with or without pump
 
Based on the contour of my land I need to make a descision on my septic location.

If I keep the tank and leach field close to my house I have sufficicent slope for my perimeter drain. BUT it is now too close to my well.
I would need to pay to move the well to the front yard.

OR I can move the tank and field slightly away from the house.
But I would have to pump from the house to the tank.
Installer told me $1,500 for this option. Which is cheaper then $3,000-$4,000 for the well work.

Any suggestions? My first thought was move the well... Since it is a one time cost. Not sure what the ongoing cost is for a pump..

Ghostmaker 07-23-2013 12:09 PM

Don't you have some local state official that is the authority on your septic system? Perhaps your local health department or state EPA. I would not do anything until they look into the manner and tell you what you can do.

47_47 07-23-2013 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theedudenator (Post 1219899)
Based on the contour of my land I need to make a descision on my septic location.

If I keep the tank and leach field close to my house I have sufficicent slope for my perimeter drain.

Waste water only into the septic. What perimeter drain do you mean?

I would want a gravity only septic system.

theedudenator 07-23-2013 12:26 PM

I am doing what the local county is telling me.
Move the well, or pump the septic.

The permiter drain is a county requirement to keep ground water from entering the field.

Installers are telling my pumps are common and used all the time.
But in my head I think all gravity is better.

TOOL82 07-23-2013 05:11 PM

Move the well.

Pumps work & they are installed all the time, but they do break.

If you are pumping from the house to the tank you will need a grinder pump & all kind of stuff stop them from working like baby wipes & female products.

You can say you will not put that stuff down the drain, but every system that I fixed because of people putting stuff down the drain that they are not suppose. They all said before I pulled that stuff out that they don't do that.

So move the well & pump your tank every (3) years & worry about fixing something else around the house.

Daniel Holzman 07-23-2013 06:43 PM

I have a pumped septic system. The first pump lasted almost 20 years. I doubt I will get 20 from the replacement, made in China pump, but perhaps ten is not out of the question. Cost me about $2000 to get the tank pumped out, and replace the pump and float. Your cost will vary, depends on location etc., but $2000 for replacement is not unreasonable. Trust me, this is NOT a job you want to DIY, unless you really know what you are doing. Confined space entry, toxic gases etc.

If you get ten years out of the pump, you can compare that with moving the well. You also need a pump chamber with a pump, make sure that is figured into the cost of the system by the installer.

One little detail is that a pumped system works better in many cases than gravity, since the pump provides positive head to encourage the effluent to flow evenly through the distribution box, whereas in a gravity system, even slight shifting of the distribution box can make one or more of the leach field pipes fail to function correctly. So my take is a pumped system is likely to work better than gravity, hence the field should last longer.

theedudenator 07-23-2013 07:11 PM

Just to clarify, the pump is after the tank to the leach field.

So there should not be problems with debris?

Not sure why a pump would be more efficent, never read anything like that.

Ghostmaker 07-23-2013 09:23 PM

The guys a civil engineer I would take his word.

md2lgyk 07-24-2013 07:52 AM

In my experience, you usually have a lot more leeway in where to put the well than you do the septic system. In fact, where I live, being in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, there's no septic leeway at all. The Health Department tells you exactly what type and size of system to install, and exactly where to put it. The only restriction on the well (I think) is that it has to be at least 100 feet from the septic field. There also has to be a designated 10,000 square foot area on the property for a "septic reserve" in case the original system ever fails. Nothing permanent can be built in that area. Because of these relatively new requirements, there are now dozens of vacant mountain lots around here that can't be built on because they're too small.


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