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-   -   Schedule 80 vs 40 CPVC (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/schedule-80-vs-40-cpvc-159554/)

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 03:42 PM

Schedule 80 vs 40 CPVC
 
Is the 80 overkill? for replumb?

rjniles 10-09-2012 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1027467)
Is the 80 overkill? for replumb?


Schedule 80 is much more expensive than 40 and you will never win a bid quoting sch 80. You will probably lose to another plumber quoting PEX.

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 03:56 PM

Re-plumbing my sons home.

rjniles 10-09-2012 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1027480)
Re-plumbing my sons home.

Then just overkill. The only advantage to schedule 80 is the increased max pressure rating (which you will never see in residential applications). You will also reduce the flow rate unless you increase the size.

TheEplumber 10-09-2012 04:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1027467)
Is the 80 overkill? for replumb?

Are you talking water pipe or drainage?
Must be water-- they don't make DWV for sch 80 that I know of--I think I just answered my own question :yes:

Pvc is not allowed inside a house for potable water....

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 04:29 PM

Water

rjniles 10-09-2012 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1027491)

Pvc is not allowed inside a house for potable water....

The poster was asking about CPVC.

TheEplumber 10-09-2012 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1027504)
Water

Go pex. Next to copper it's the best product- I know, some don't like copper either. :wink:
pex is DIY friendly and quite durable

TheEplumber 10-09-2012 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1027506)
The poster was asking about CPVC.

Ah, so he was :laughing:
I wouldn't recommend cpvc at all. We used it around here for a very short time. Now it's hard to find here...

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 04:42 PM

Dont want to start another Pex vs the world debate, but......I have two things that stick in my head about Pex: Taste in water and flow reduction, so I have read.

Convince me...................

TheEplumber 10-09-2012 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digitalplumber (Post 1027516)
Dont want to start another Pex vs the world debate, but......I have two things that stick in my head about Pex: Taste in water and flow reduction, so I have read.

Convince me...................

Never heard about water taste..
And yes, you can have flow reduction as you can with any pipe you use. Just have to know how to size the line properly.
The joining system and type of fittings also play a factor in flow characteristics.
I like to use the ProPex expander system but the tool is spendy for one project. ProPex/Uponor uses full size fittings.
The crimp system uses smaller ID fittings that will affect the flow if not considered in the line sizing but still is quite popular. You can rent crimpers too.

rjniles 10-09-2012 05:18 PM

+1 with what he ^^^ said.

I re-plumbed my house 5 years ago with PEX (crimp rings). I used 3/4" trunk lines to mini-manifolds and 1/2" to each fixture. I installed a shutoff to each fixture after the mini-manifold. No issues with flow or pressure.

No taste issues and why would there be any difference than CPVC.

I am surprised that you as a plumber are not already using PEX in some applications.

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 05:22 PM

not a plumber, digitalplumber is just a handle for this website!:jester:

Thanks:thumbup:

Daniel Holzman 10-09-2012 05:50 PM

PVC pipe rating is 289 psi for 3/4 inch pipe schedule 40, 509 psi for schedule 80. CPVC rating is 480 psi for Schedule 40, 690 psi for schedule 80. 1/2 inch pipe is considerably higher. CPVC and PVC both derate with temperature. At the maximum operating temperature for CPVC of 200 degrees F, the allowable pressure derates to 20 percent of the rated pressure quoted, which is for 73 degrees F.

You are not going to run your domestic hot water at 200 degrees, typically hot water is at about 120 degrees F, at which temperature CPVC derates to 70 percent, and PVC derates to 40 percent. Even at 40 percent capacity for PVC, in theory you would have an allowable pressure of approximately 120 psi for 3/4 inch PVC at 120 degrees F, however PVC is not recommended for hot water applications. In any case, there is no reason to use schedule 80 CPVC, it is overkill and more expensive, but if you already have it, you can certainly use it.

By the way, I concur with the recommendation to use PEX, but I realize this is controversial on this forum and elsewhere.

digitalplumber 10-09-2012 05:54 PM

No have not bought, in the demo stage.

Thanks


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