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-   -   running the sump pump to the sewer line (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/running-sump-pump-sewer-line-4592/)

Jack Hass 10-31-2006 08:19 PM

running the sump pump to the sewer line
 
My sump pump in my crawl space runs out of the house and then 50 feet slightly down hill through PVC Pipe to the back of my yard. The pipe runs under concrete decking. The pipe is broken and when the sump pump fires up I can see water comming from under the concrete.

I want to T my sump pump line into my washing machine discharge line that draines into the sewage system. I am on city sewage.

Is this ok?
Why didn't the home builder do this in the first place?

Ron The Plumber 10-31-2006 09:49 PM

Probably against code, so I'd have to say no it is not ok.

Jack Hass 11-01-2006 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber (Post 22451)
Probably against code, so I'd have to say no it is not ok.

What is the thought about that? Why would that be a problem? Why would 5 gallons of ground water a day in the sewer lines be bad?

Is it because people get charged a sewer fee based on the amount of water they use and that ground water would not be getting paid for?

redline 11-01-2006 07:40 PM

If everyone had their basement pumping into the sewer then when there was a heavy rainfall it would put a high demand on the sewage treatment plant. And their may be oil or other chemicals that may get into the water system.

concretemasonry 11-01-2006 08:07 PM

running the sump pump to the sewer line
 
In the past, it was legal and common to mix sanitary and storm sewage. The sewers were called common sewers an comtained normal sewage that took treatement and storm water that usually didn't require treatment.

Then they found out it was costing a fortune to treat all the storom water AND the sewage since it could not be separated once it was in the pipe. On top of the treatment cost, there was the cost of building and maintaining twice the treatment capacity.

Now, it is illegal to make new hook-ups in most areas. Most older cities are separating the street drains from the sewer drains where possible rather than building additional treatment capacity because it is cheaper to be split in the end.

Unfortunately, there are still many roof drains going into the sewer lines at the house.

Where I lived at one time years ago, when there was a big storm, the excess sewer flow was just dumped in the river and not treated. Everyone downstream did not take kindly to it, so the systems were separated.

It does not look like much, but it certainlt counts up at the wrong time.

************

Double A 11-01-2006 09:03 PM

Another good reason not to dump this water down the sewer is you can't see that its actually making it there, depending on how you plumb it.

One more good reason is, if your sewer is higher than your sump, and your check valve fails, you're gonna get a basement full of icky.

I would find a new place for the discharge to run out to daylight, downhill from the house.

mdshunk 11-01-2006 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jack Hass (Post 22529)
Why would 5 gallons of ground water a day in the sewer lines be bad?

Maybe 5 gallons a day at your house. I've worked in many, many homes that get 5 gallons every 5 minutes when it's raining. I just depends on how you're situated.

Ron The Plumber 11-01-2006 10:19 PM

Reasons have been stated, oils and contaminates going into the sewer system is bad, reclaimed water get returned back to the rivers and streams, it's all about the enviroment.

Think about this the next time you go fishing.

Jack Hass 11-02-2006 08:33 AM

Alright on to plan B

redline 11-02-2006 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jack Hass (Post 22596)
Alright on to plan B


Plan B - direct water to neighbors yard and let them get rid of it.:jester:


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