DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Running lines to baseboard heater using Pex. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/running-lines-baseboard-heater-using-pex-47981/)

RyanD 07-02-2009 04:52 PM

Running lines to baseboard heater using Pex.
 
So I've been researching Pex more because it seems much easier to work with than copper and it's cheaper. A friend has the tool to crimp so I figured I could purchase some tubing and give it a go. The two plumbing projects I need to tackle are moving the washing machine and re-routing the baseboard heater to a new wall. I'm concerned about the baseboard because I don't know how hot the water gets; will Pex work fine for that?

Basically the pipes that go to the baseboard now travel from one corner of the room, all the way around the room to the adjacent corner is started in. Why..I have no idea but it's very inefficient and a waste of pipe. My plan is to remove all of that copper and just re-run it using Pex the correct way. Will Pex work fine for this, are there any potential issues I may run into?

jpelzer 07-02-2009 05:37 PM

Manufacturers have a special heating-specific pex that also has an oxygen barrier integrated. Usually referred to as radiant pex, it's the product you'd use for a radiant floor, and also for running to radiators.

So they're different products, the pex for potable, and the pex for heating.

plumbob1234 07-03-2009 12:52 AM

something to consider is if their is a headder running several heating loops or elements, they have to be within 10% of each others length, unless a balancing headder is in use. If one loop is significantly shorter than the others, it will get the majority of the flow. Also as Jpelzer said their is a difference in pex types, the heating pex has an oxygen barrier, and it is usually, but not always colored red. The pex for heating will be stamped as such and state,"not for potable water".

breid 07-04-2009 08:08 PM

flow
 
rd. also remember pex flows less water than copper. particularly with insert fittings. noticeably less. read some flow charts. breid

jpelzer 07-04-2009 11:18 PM

Probably not noticeably less, at least not to a single fixture.
http://www.toolbase.org/PDF/CaseStud...r_pressure.pdf

plumbob1234 07-05-2009 08:32 AM

You two plumb nice now, or youl both get a time out. PS. before I take a side is the copper reemed or non.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07 AM.