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-   -   running extension from outside garden hose faucet (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/running-extension-outside-garden-hose-faucet-105638/)

denemante 05-26-2011 10:26 AM

running extension from outside garden hose faucet
 
I've got a hose faucet back in my bushes where it's hard to get to. So I ran heavy-duty hose from it behind the bushes to near my driveway 35 feet away, and put an on-off value at the end which is staked into the ground. Then I attached another hose to it. I leave the water from the house faucet on, and only shut it off at my inline valve.

But for my extension from the house - even with the most heavy-duty hose I could find - it keeps bursting - and I keep replacing it.

I've been lucky - I catch it each time because you can hear the water running when it goes. But if I wasn't home, I would flood my yard or even my basement.

We live in Atlanta. In the deep winter, I shut this value off from the inside in case of freezing. But in the summer, while direct sunlight doesn't hit this extension hose - I'm sure it still warms up.

I need a better solution. Could I permanantly run copper pipe or PVC on the outside in place of the extension hose? I'd still likely need to attach it to the outside faucet with some twist-on hose-type connection - there isn't enough copper hanging out for me to cut off the faucet and solder it on.

Effectively, what I'm looking to do is "move" the place where you turn the hose on/off to the edge of my driveway vs. having to crawl through the bushes each time.

But an additional fear is that while a break/leak/burst on the outside is still bad - I wouldn't want my plan to perhaps affect the pipe indoors pre-faucet in my basement ceiling.

Noteworthy is that this particular faucet sprouts off the main water line coming into my basement. It's got an indoor shut-off valve, but I've let of largely wide-open to gain pressure for washing cars, the driveway, etc. Perhaps the pressure is too great for a hose, period and I need to back off the flow - and a regular hose would then still work.

rjniles 05-26-2011 10:49 AM

I ran water out underground to my garden area using 3/4" PVC pipe. Here is my connection to the hose bib on the side of the house.

http://i611.photobucket.com/albums/t...20PUP/hose.jpg

I used the Y connector but you do not need it if you don't want to use the hose bib at the house. The copper color flex pipe is a water heater connection pipe. You need a 3/4" hose to 3/4" pipe fitting to transition the threads from the bib (hose thread) to the flex (pipe thread).

I disconnect and drain the pipe for the winter.

denemante 05-26-2011 12:57 PM

Sweet - that's exactly what I was thinking. Have you had any issues with it, and how long have you used it? Your climate is the same as mine.

Do you leave it turned on at the house at all times (except winter)? That's what I plan - it will be pressurized the whole time out to the far end where my regular hose connects.

Finally - I did have a backflow preventer at the bib but it was faulty so I just removed it. I hear they are so stagnant hose water (or bacteria/bugs crawling into an open hose end) don't enter the main water supply of the house.

Do you think this is useful? If I'm building this, it would seem I might as well add one to the bib.

I used to think the backflow preventers were pressure releases (like if the hose pressure got too great, it would blow off some water harmlessly at that valve, saving burst hoses). I wonder is such a device exists.

rjniles 05-26-2011 05:49 PM

This is the 3rd year with no issues. I do not have a back flow device on mine but I do not think it would hurt. I am on a well and I leave mine on all the time (except winter).

Homerepairguy 05-26-2011 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denemante (Post 655398)
Finally - I did have a backflow preventer at the bib but it was faulty so I just removed it. I hear they are so stagnant hose water (or bacteria/bugs crawling into an open hose end) don't enter the main water supply of the house.

Do you think this is useful? If I'm building this, it would seem I might as well add one to the bib.

If the output end of your extension hose can ever be in a situation where it could back siphon water, it must have a backflow preventer by code to prevent contamination of the potable water system. Back flow can happen if there is a water main break and your water system loses pressure. Contaminates could then get sucked back into the city water system and contaminate your neighborhood water as well as your own system.

Backflow prevention is not an option but is mandatory for responsible thinking folks. So yes, by all means install a backflow preventer.

HRG

Missouri Bound 05-26-2011 10:28 PM

Regrdless of the situation or application, every outside spigot must have a backflow preventer. And there are stainless steel hoses available with the proper fittings and in several sizes. That would allow a simple twist disconnect.

HomeInsulation 05-27-2011 01:18 PM

Thanks rjniles,

I love it when people solve my problems for me.

I owe you one!


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