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Old 04-12-2012, 06:54 PM   #16
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


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I have had the meter connected to the outside spicket for about an hour and a half and it is reading 150 psi on the black, and 190psi on the red. Has it been on there long enough, is that a possible reading? Could meter be bad? Does it need to stay on there longer?
The black needle is a realtime readout. It instantly indicates the current water pressure. 150 psi is much too high for your home's water pressure and 190 psi is out of sight. The excessively high pressure is causing problems in your plumbing system. Normal water pressure for a home should be about 60 psi.
Did you have the main water valve turned off?

Do you have a pressure reducing valve (aka pressure regulator) installed where the cold water line from the city enters your home? Looks like this:


If you didn't have the main water valve turned off creating a closed system, then maybe the city installed an anti-backup check valve which is causing all of your problems. Heated water has no place to expand creating leaks and maybe the rumbling.

1. With the pressure gauge attached, open a different cold water faucet and leave the water running. What's the reading?

2. Then close the water faucet and what's the reading?

When you opened the different cold water faucet in step-1, you released the pressure build up in your system. Closing the faucet in step-2 will give you the real pressure reading for your home since the built up pressure was released. Then at that time, "gently" turn the middle knob on the pressure gauge counter-clockwise to make the red needle just butt against the black needle. Now leave the pressure gauge overnight and see what the maximum water pressure was overnight as indicated by the red needle.

Do you have an expansion tank by your water heater? It will look something like this but maybe a different color:



It is normally connected to the cold water input line to the water heater like this:



The backflow preventer in the picture is what the city would have installed at the input to your property (if your property has a backflow preventer).

You may already know this but just in case not, when hot water expands in the water heater, it affects the water pressure in both hot and cold water lines since the cold water line is connected to the heater's tank. This is why you can read the high pressure at the cold water line hose bib.

HRG


Last edited by Homerepairguy; 04-12-2012 at 09:28 PM.
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Old 04-13-2012, 06:52 AM   #17
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


There is something in the main line coming in up next to the ceiling in the garage that I have not got a ladder and looked at real close. It doesn't appear to look exactly like what you have there, but I am guessing that it is alot older. My home was built in 1977, were they putting those in the lines at that time? I am at work now, but I was thinking about the pressure I had. The spicket I have it attached to is attached to the main water line before that device that is iline with the cold water. Could that be the problem? Maybe I should move the Watts to the back spicket and check again, what do you think? I did have the main water valve on when I was checking the gauge. How long does it take for the meter to balance out and get an accurate reading? I did what you said when I left this morning and left my sink faucet cracked on, as well as I did last night. I definitely dont have an expansion tank.
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Old 04-13-2012, 03:56 PM   #18
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


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There is something in the main line coming in up next to the ceiling in the garage that I have not got a ladder and looked at real close. It doesn't appear to look exactly like what you have there, but I am guessing that it is alot older. My home was built in 1977, were they putting those in the lines at that time?
Set Google to "images" and then google "water pressure reducing valve". The images that display will show you the different types of pressure reducing valves to compare to the thing in your main line. I doubt that that thing is a pressure reducing valve since it's next to the ceiling. They are normally installed for easy access by folks standing on the ground/floor.

Quote:
I am at work now, but I was thinking about the pressure I had. The spicket I have it attached to is attached to the main water line before that device that is iline with the cold water. Could that be the problem? Maybe I should move the Watts to the back spicket and check again, what do you think?
It wouldn't hurt to check the water pressure at the back spigot. Static water pressure will be the same no matter where it's checked provided there are no leaks in the system and a pressure reducing valve is not between the front and the back. If the pressure is lower at the back spigot, what's the pressure?

Quote:
I did have the main water valve on when I was checking the gauge. How long does it take for the meter to balance out and get an accurate reading?
As soon as you open any faucet, any built up water pressure will be released instantly. Closing the faucet a few seconds later will insure that pressure readings are the normal pressure.

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I did what you said when I left this morning and left my sink faucet cracked on, as well as I did last night. I definitely dont have an expansion tank.
Leaving the faucet cracked on was a good thing if you turned the main water valve off.

I think your primary goals now should be:

1. Ask the city if they installed a back-flow preventer check valve in the water line feeding your property.

2. Determine whether you have a pressure reducing valve installed. If you do, determine whether it's working. If you have one, post and I'll tell you how to tell if it's working.

3. Leave the main water valve open. Install the water pressure gauge on a hose bib. Take a shower or whatever you normally do that uses the most amount of hot water. Set the red needle on the water pressure gauge against the black needle. "Don't open any faucet" for an extended period. See what your maximum water pressure is.

4. You probably should have a thermal expansion tank installed but that's your call. From what you said so far about your pressure readings, I would have one installed if it were my property.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 04-13-2012 at 05:33 PM.
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:19 AM   #19
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


I put the gauge on the back spicket, and turned it on, the red needle did not move off zero. I turned off the water and unattached it, then reattached it. The readings are now about the same as the front spicket. You said something about setting the red needle on the black. I did not manually adjust a starting point for the needles, do I need to do that? There definitely is a pressure reducing valve on my cold water line coming into the water heater. I guess that it needs adjusting or is not working?
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:42 PM   #20
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


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Originally Posted by rogerwright View Post
I put the gauge on the back spicket, and turned it on, the red needle did not move off zero. I turned off the water and unattached it, then reattached it. The readings are now about the same as the front spicket. You said something about setting the red needle on the black. I did not manually adjust a starting point for the needles, do I need to do that? There definitely is a pressure reducing valve on my cold water line coming into the water heater. I guess that it needs adjusting or is not working?
Roger,

I'm going to start a new thread since that oversized picture that Bob22 posted is making this thread so hard to read in the "preview" mode when I'm responding to your posts. It will have the same subject + part2.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 04-14-2012 at 12:59 PM.
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Old 04-14-2012, 01:42 PM   #21
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


did you post a new reply in the new thread. Will I automatically be directed to it?
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Old 04-14-2012, 02:35 PM   #22
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rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve


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did you post a new reply in the new thread. Will I automatically be directed to it?
Look for the thread with subject line:

"Part2 - rumbling pipes and leaking pressure relief valve"

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