DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   rough drains in basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/rough-drains-basement-14543/)

pintojoe 12-17-2007 05:38 PM

rough drains in basement
 
1 Attachment(s)
Im puting in a bathroom in my basement and wanted to know if this proposed plan would work for my drains? do I need any more vents or will the main stack be enough, I already busted the floor around the main and dont want to go any farther, any advise would be greatly appreciatedAttachment 1893

DrDave 12-17-2007 06:35 PM

Can you post a higher resolution image? when we enlarge it the text is unreadable.

pintojoe 12-17-2007 07:55 PM

Dave can you just click on the pick and then click on it again to blow it up?
I dont know how to get a high res on it

DrDave 12-17-2007 08:19 PM

Well maybe the experts on plumbing will have enough to answer your question. IMHO If the slope is right for the drains and the vent has no restrictions, I see no problem. But this is a little out of my area.:huh:

Marlin 12-17-2007 08:43 PM

You're trying to wet vent everything through your main stack? That isn't going to work especially with a near 16ft run for the shower.

jpplumber 12-18-2007 12:35 AM

There needs to be venting from the sink, the shower and the toilet all looped over and tied back ABOVE the venting of the upstairs fixtures or possibly if the local codes allow you can use air admittance valves instead of running all that extra pipe. If you don't vent, the toilet flushing will suck the water right out of the other two fixture traps and the smell of sewer will be all over the house. There are other issues to consider about how to connect vent fittings, the slope of the pipe and how high above the fixtures the vent must be...also, once you install plumbing drains, sewer backups always reveal themselves in the lowest level in the system, in this case the shower. We don't have many basements in Texas and even fewer with plumbing in them so I don't know how you deal with that eventuality.

pintojoe 12-18-2007 12:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Thanks for the advise, take a look at the updated pic and see if this would do the trickAttachment 1904

RippySkippy 12-18-2007 01:21 PM

The second version looks better. As I recall, when I did my house the inspector was happy as long as there was a vent with in 6 feet of the fixture he was happy....

Ron The Plumber 12-18-2007 01:25 PM

Everything about this looks non code approved, at least here it would not fly.

pintojoe 12-18-2007 01:41 PM

Well Thanks guys, I guess Ill go down to the buliding dept and get the rule book

jpplumber 12-18-2007 01:53 PM

Good idea. You could bring your sketch and see if they will advise you.

KUIPORNG 12-18-2007 02:37 PM

rather than sharing upstairs vent to complicate the matters or interfering existing system, would it be easier to just open up a new vent from the basement wall if your basement is not 100% underground like many others.

pintojoe 12-18-2007 07:16 PM

You mean run the vent out the side of the house?

Marlin 12-18-2007 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pintojoe (Post 81686)
You mean run the vent out the side of the house?

No, that would be illigle as well.


It's almost impossible to explain how to do this

The shower needs to be plumbed in 2"
The sink needs to be 1 1/2"
The toilet needs to be 3"
Any pipe with more than one fixture on it needs to be at least 2"
A single fixture can be vented with 1 1/2, more than that it needs to go up to 2".


I'd point the trap from your shower at a 45 toward the left (looking at the stack) wall. Run the pipe at a 45 toward the wall and as soon as you get under it have a 2" 45 so that you can run parallel to it. Right after that break up with a 2 x 1/2 wye and an 1 1/2" 45 this will get you vertical for a vent. Continue the waste along that wall and then use a long sweep elbow to go right into the 3" using a 3" x 2" coupling.
For the sink waste use 1 - 1/2" tapped tee. Drop is straight down, into a long sweep pointing toward the 3" line. Run it into the 3" line using a 1 1/2" 45 going into a 3 x 1 1/2" wye. You might be able to use 2in pipe for the sink and wet vent the toilet but that's up to your local codes.
If you can't wet vent like that right after the toilet waste (not before) you need to come up in that wall with 1 1/2".

Now for your vents.
Run the vent line from your shower 48" high and put an elbow on. Run it through the studs and around the corner.
For the sink bring it up from the tapped tee to 48", put an elbow on it and run it through the studs, pick up the toilet vent with that line and switch to 2" theirafter since you have two fixtures vented with it now. Continue on in the wall, and somewhere tie the shower vent and the sink/toilet vent together. You then need some somehow run that up and either tie it into the main stack (I couldn't tell you where), or bring it through the roof increasing to 3" before doing so.
If you have a drop ceiling or are pretty good at what you're doing you may be able to run all the vent lines up into the ceiling and tie them together there.

You might need to go with 2*6 walls if you need to do all that drilling. Make sure all your vents and wastes are properly pitched. You may or may not be allowed to use tee wyes on their side, it's up to the local building department. I'm allowed to use them here but I explained it here without using them.

jpplumber 12-19-2007 06:36 AM

Quote:

It's almost impossible to explain how to do this
You're right Marlin, but you gave it a good try :thumbsup: ...the main thing at this point is that he sounds willing to do it right and I am hoping that he gets hooked up with his local building department to check his work. If they allow studor vents (air admittance valves), a quarter (or less) of his work is solved....he still needs to knock out concrete and run the drains, be inspected, backfill, patch, set fixtures and pick a nice color for the walls, flooring.....

Pintojoe. Even professionals are required to have their work inspected by local officials and to pull (and pay for) permits. They will probably require a water test on the drains by inserting a test tee and test ball. I am all for DIY but most importantly Do It Right.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:56 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved