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will_53115 01-14-2009 03:57 PM

Rookie DIY Question
 
Basement coming on great but now a bathroom question.
In connecting the copper pipe to shut off valve is there another way to connect besides sweating?

DUDE! 01-14-2009 04:45 PM

yes, depends what type shut-off valve you get, you can go with a compression fitting, no soldering

Nestor_Kelebay 01-14-2009 04:46 PM

There are different kinds of ways to connect copper piping to a valve, but I expect 99% of the people in here would agree that soldering is the most reliable method.

Threaded connections can be troublesome in getting the valve body at a desireable angle.

Compression fittings require that a brass ferrule be crimped onto the copper pipe, and so switching to a different kind of connection requires cutting the pipe a bit shorter to eliminate the brass ferrule from the pipe.

Soldering is the best way to connect the valve in my books.

And the best shut off valve to use is a ball valve. As long as the valve is in the open position when it's soldered in, the teflon seals in it will stand the heat.

bradnailer 01-14-2009 05:46 PM

If you do decide to sweat a valve on, I'd strongly suggest you sweat on a male threaded adapter then use a female threaded valve. Shut off valves don't last long where I live so with the threaded adapter, I don't have to sweat a new valve, I just unscrew the old one and screw on a new one.

majakdragon 01-15-2009 11:16 AM

You can purchase compression shut-off valves in either straight or angled configurations. Use two wrenches when installing so the valve does not turn and the nut is properly tightened. Make sure you push the valve all the way onto the pipe before tightening.


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