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Pandura 01-03-2013 04:59 PM

Rinnai Tankless Vent Question
 
I am installing a Rinnai RL75iN Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater and have a question about the ventilation installation. I live in Illinois and am curious how high above the ground level I need the direct vent termination to be on the outside wall? It appears that 12" may be the answer but I'm concerned about meeting code where snow may change the requirements. Any definitive answers here? Thanks in advance!

ben's plumbing 01-03-2013 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pandura (Post 1085577)
I am installing a Rinnai RL75iN Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater and have a question about the ventilation installation. I live in Illinois and am curious how high above the ground level I need the direct vent termination to be on the outside wall? It appears that 12" may be the answer but I'm concerned about meeting code where snow may change the requirements. Any definitive answers here? Thanks in advance!

what does the installation manual say ....it should give you that answer...ben sr

Pandura 01-03-2013 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ben's plumbing (Post 1085632)
what does the installation manual say ....it should give you that answer...ben sr

The installation manual says, "Clearance above grade (including anticipated snow line)" is 12 inches. I'm thinking Illinois code specifies the height taking into account the "anticipated snow line". I have no idea what the anticipated snow line would be.

ben's plumbing 01-03-2013 06:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pandura (Post 1085641)
The installation manual says, "Clearance above grade (including anticipated snow line)" is 12 inches. I'm thinking Illinois code specifies the height taking into account the "anticipated snow line". I have no idea what the anticipated snow line would be.

the other installation guidelines would help with that... if you need a condensation trap or if you drop the condensation out the end of pipe to outside....12" seems right ...if you get more snow than that at any given time you may need to go out and clear away exhaust pipe....ben sr

Ishmael 01-03-2013 07:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pandura (Post 1085641)
The installation manual says, "Clearance above grade (including anticipated snow line)" is 12 inches. I'm thinking Illinois code specifies the height taking into account the "anticipated snow line". I have no idea what the anticipated snow line would be.

Check with your local inspector.

jagans 01-03-2013 07:41 PM

With the way weather patterns have been changing, I would get it as high as you can plus 12 Inches.

Pandura 01-03-2013 10:52 PM

If I can't find an solid answer I'm thinking I will get the 39" extension to get it 4' off the ground... that has got to be high enough I would think. Interesting how hard it is to find an answer using advanced google searches. I'm usually pretty good and finding what I want.

ben's plumbing 01-04-2013 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pandura (Post 1085719)
If I can't find an solid answer I'm thinking I will get the 39" extension to get it 4' off the ground... that has got to be high enough I would think. Interesting how hard it is to find an answer using advanced google searches. I'm usually pretty good and finding what I want.

again the rest of the installation provides guidlines to how you have to exit the building....if you use a condensation trap at heater pipe must slope 1/4" per foot back toward heater....then you can exit house and raise out side ...if not using trap at heater...max height off heater 5' then 1/4 " per foot falling away from heater to allow condensation to drip out the end of pipe what would be the height then......remember if condensation drips into heater it will ruin it........as a side note the installation manual says only certified installers can install this product...ben sr

jagans 01-04-2013 07:56 AM

Certified by Whom, Ben. I worked for a Master plumber who was so good that he ran all his copper without fittings. He could literally look at an installation and bend his pipes perfectly with a pipe bender. Guy was phenomenal. He taught me most of what I know and we were working on burners in an oil refinery. Of course, I am not certified. I think an awful lot of it has to do with giving a crap about what you do, and reading to understand what you need to know. Im sure certification is a good thing to have though.

Is there a test that can be taken, or is it like college, where you have to pay to play?

SuperJETT 01-04-2013 08:26 AM

For them to honor the warranty, it has to be installed by a licensed plumber. It's not rocket science but is involved: properly sized gas line, 110V circuit, vent properly to the outside, water hookups, and condensate line.

Pandura 01-04-2013 09:38 AM

I bought this house as a project to remodel the entire thing with the goal of learning and to save money, not to make it. The only reason it has taken me so many years on this remodel is because I have been doing a ton of research to make sure I am doing everything to code and learning the correct way to do things. It drives my wife nuts but when I'm done I'm satisfied. That is the whole reason I am posting here in search of code information. I am a mathematician and pretty detail oriented. I understand that because I live in a cold climate it is recommended to use the condensate trap. I will have one 90 degree elbow leading out of the house and will have it slanted inward towards the house per installation instructions. I am using the Ubbink vent system as recommended.

My single question was how high do I need to be outside? I'm within all specification in terms of distance from soffit, corners, other exhaust, windows, air conditioner, gas meters, etc.

I will look for local references to anticipated snow level but my town isn't really that big and often defers to state, national, or nearby codes of larger cities. And I do understand that most warranties require a licensed installer but do you have any idea how much money I have saved over the years by doing things myself? If I'm capable, the risk vs. reward is a simple decisions. Not meeting code when doing it myself is a deal breaker though as the risk becomes too high for me. I do understand that many people end up getting in over their head and require to be saved by local licensed tradesmen and that there are plenty of stories of how messed up people do things, I'm not that guy!

Thanks again for everyone's input. I'll keep looking.


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