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Old 01-22-2011, 05:26 PM   #1
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


My shut off valve has been leaking and I'm attempting to replace it. I picked up some replacement parts today but I'm having a heck of a time getting the old shut off valve to come off. Below is a picture of the shut off valve:



The replacement shut off valve I picked up has a compression nut but this one doesn't. How do I get this thing off?

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Old 01-22-2011, 05:38 PM   #2
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Quote:
Originally Posted by davidevan
My shut off valve has been leaking and I'm attempting to replace it. I picked up some replacement parts today but I'm having a heck of a time getting the old shut off valve to come off. Below is a picture of the shut off valve:

The replacement shut off valve I picked up has a compression nut but this one doesn't. How do I get this thing off?
First make sure the water is shut of
Then u can either heat the fitting with the map gas until the old solder breaks free or u can purchase a small pipe cutter and just simply cut it off
Your new shutoff will just slip on and just tighten and your good

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Old 01-22-2011, 05:39 PM   #3
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Assuming it is threaded. Sometimes turning the valve to the right can help break it loose.
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Old 01-22-2011, 05:45 PM   #4
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Thanks for the quick replies! Is the technique that was used here called "sweating"?

I tried to see if it was threaded but I couldn't get it to break free. I was really reefing on it too.

It looks like my only options are heat or a pipe cutter. I don't have either, so I'll have to pick one and run with it.
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Old 01-22-2011, 05:55 PM   #5
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


does not look like enough pipe there to cut it off and then install a compression valve. i'd get a torch, unsolder that valve, then sweat a new one in its place. you'll need to pick up a torch, fuel (mapp is best but propane would probably work), flux, and solder. Drain the piping and use a pair of pliers to apply pressure to the valve. when the solder is melted the valve should come off. flux both ends, use the pliers to hold the new one to the pipe, then heat it back up. once everything is hot enough the valve will slip on, then apply solder all the way around. shouldn't take too long, and it'll cost ya around 60-70 bucks (way cheaper than a plumber )
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Old 01-22-2011, 06:52 PM   #6
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


You can get a torch kit at Home Depot for like $30 I think. It comes will a little fuel tank, the torch tip, a sparker, a roll of solder, a little can of flux and even a flux brush I think. So all you need is 1) that kit, 2) some emory cloth (if the kit doesn't already come with this) and 3) a new shutoff valve. For the valve, make sure you buy a right angle, 3/8" female x 1/2" solder (aka sweat). That is the exact valve you have on there now.

1) shut the water off to the house, turn on the faucet to that sink, and turn on a faucet or two in the floor below that faucet. Let the water finish draining out of the faucet(s) on the floor below. Disconnect the supply line from the sink to the old valve.

2) Read the instructions on the torch kit so you learn how to use it. Start the torch and adjust the tip until about an inch or so of blue flame tip is coming out. Hold onto the old valve with pliers, then put the tip of the blue flame directly onto the joint where the valve meets the pipe. You can move the tip around a little so you heat up more of the joint and not just one small little spot. While heating the joint, keep gently trying to twist the valve with the pliers. After about 30 seconds or so, the existing solder should melt and the valve will slip off.

3) Let the pipe that is coming out of the wall cool. Use the emory cloth to sand about 3/4" of the end of the pipe until you get it down to shiny bare copper. Also roll up some emory cloth and scuff up the inside of the valve. Use a paper towel or something to wipe off the copper dust from the pipe and the inside of the valve.

4) Use the flux brush to apply a thorough coating of flux to end of the pipe and the inside of the joint. MAKE SURE YOU COAT THE ENTIRE SURFACE OF THE END OF THE PIPE AND THE INSIDE OF THE VALVE. Solder often won't adhere to spots that weren't fluxed.

5) BE SURE TO OPEN THE VALVE HANDLE ALL THE WAY BEFORE SOLDERING! The valve closes by seating itself closed with a little rubber washer. If the valve is closed (the rubber washer touches the body of the valve) when you solder, the washer will often melt and you ruin the valve

6) Push the valve all the way onto the pipe. Start the torch, again put the tip of the blue flame directly onto the joint. Move it around the joint a little so you attempt to heat the joint up as evenly as possibly. After about 10 seconds or so, start touching the end of the solder to the joint OPPOSITE the side you are currently torching. When the joint is heated up enough, the solder will literally suck itself into the joint. Let about 1/2" or so of solder suck into the joint (until you see the silver color of the solder fully around the joint). Turn off the torch.

Let the joint cool, reconnect the supply line, turn the water back on. Done. (you can use a damp rag to wipe off the excess solder, if any, immediately after you finished soldering the joint. You don't have to do this, but it makes the job look neater).
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:45 PM   #7
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Quote:
Originally Posted by davidevan View Post
It looks like my only options are heat or a pipe cutter. I don't have either, so I'll have to pick one and run with it.
If you go with a torch, consider buying a piece of sheet metal about 16" square or so to shield your wall from the heat.. Hardware stores usually sell them.

Cut the sheet "about" in half but with one side about 3" larger than the other. Set the larger piece on the floor and mark where your pipe sticks out of the wall. Cut a notch for the pipe in that larger piece. Then overlap the two pieces to shield your wall. It's best if you have two sheets of metal but if you only have one sheet, get a piece from a cardboard box and cut to size. Dampen the cardboard with a spray bottle and put it behind the sheet metal so the hot sheet metal won't scorch your wall.

Oh, and BTW, cut that decorative flange off before you start working on the pipe. It will give you more room and the flange looks like it should be replaced anyway.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 01-22-2011 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:36 PM   #8
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Maybe I am too late, but here it goes. You say the valve is leaking-is it dripping water on the floor or will it not totally shut off the supply to the sink? Either way, I have been successful in repairing that type of valve without all of this work everybody else is talking about. What you have to do is find a new valve where the guts look like your old valve. Unscrew the packing nut on your old valve and the new and see if they will interchange. It has worked for me. Good Luck!
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:03 PM   #9
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


Well I know I am not going to answer your question before you answer my question so here you go....

Where it it Leaking from?
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Old 01-23-2011, 01:15 PM   #10
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Replacing shut off valve and I can't get it off. Any ideas?


DocWhitley has a good point, first off, were is it leaking from? could just be the packing. I would not cut it off because you might not have enough to get a new peice of copper on. Just sweat it off, clean it real good and sweat a new one on. If you afraid to do that maybe consider a sharkbite. Maybe put a piece of metal around it so you don't burn the wall. like a Liscence Plate.

Good luck

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