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-   -   Repair 1962 Rheem pink toilet tank or find vintage replacement ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/repair-1962-rheem-pink-toilet-tank-find-vintage-replacement-116722/)

khaef 09-09-2011 10:55 AM

Repair 1962 Rheem pink toilet tank or find vintage replacement ?
 
I'm starting a new thread, (as suggested) but it follows on a previous post where in August 2009, JJRBUS started the thread entitled "vitreous toilet tank repair" (Eijer) to fix/replace vintage toilet tank with a crack. I have a pink 1962 Rheem (Richmond-Rheem) toilet, which has worked fine (apparently) in this home since 1962! However, on Sunday, I noticed water leaking in my basement laundry area, directly below the toilet-- and went upstairs to discover the tank had a leaking crack about 1/3 way down. There was a bit of lime scale build up on the outside of tank, so perhaps it had been slow drip leaking for a while and I just didn't notice it. I immediately flushed & drained most of the water-- so it's not a problem. BUT, they don't even make Rheem toilet tanks in any color anymore from my Internet searches. So, my choices are 1) get the tank repaired, as discussed in the post thread title mentioned above , or 2) find a used/wholesale/ old toilet replacements place where I could purchase a matching color used tank. It will wreck the asthetic of my pink tub & basin which are in good, smooth condition too, to replace with a different, new "modern" looking toilet. Could you guys suggest places to purchase replacements in the Chicago area-- or where they would repair?

I have a friend who might attempt the crack repair discussed in Toilet Tank Repair thread-referenced above. It is scary to think it might "blow" like one poster mentioned-- but if Basement water cracks can be sealed/repaired, it seems this could too?? And the aquarium repairs are done with silicone-- Opinions? It would seem that the silicone repair might be the most durable and waterproof (3M products are excellent in this regard). A 3rd option would be to have it "relined"-- anyone ever heard of doing that-- what do you folks think of that?

PS: I'm not a plumber nor going to do the work myself, but do have a great handyman person who might attempt it. Any and all suggestions very gratefully considered. Thanks,


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