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amakarevic 06-13-2008 10:35 AM

refitting black pipe that has black gunky dope settled in
 
i am branching out my black gas piping for a stove and i have a cap where i left off last time. i plan to take it off and extend it a few more turns to the destination. however, when i looked closely, the black gunky dope that i used, which was the only one that made me feel safe when gas was in question, seems settled in pretty hard and tight.

Q1: will it be a b..ch to take the cap off ?
Q2: if i do manage to break the seal and twist it off, will i be able to refit over the threads that have the gunky dope settled in ?

Termite 06-13-2008 11:27 AM

I don't think it will be a problem. It will take a couple pipe wrenches to get the cap off. Just apply more gunk...It'll be fine.

Hopefully you're air testing your gaslines before you run gas to them??? You need to be.

Remember, your gasline has about 1/2psi of pressure in it...That's very, very little pressure. Leaks can be detected by using soapy water, but an airtest is required by code and is a very good idea. Around here, most cities require 10psi for 15 minutes. If the pressure drops on the gauge, you have a leak. The highest pressure you can run in a house is an elevated pressure system, which is 2psi, and is pretty rare....So, a 10psi airtest will force a leak if there's a poor connection.

amakarevic 06-13-2008 12:07 PM

how do you air test ?

Termite 06-13-2008 02:32 PM

Oh no! You gotta air test if you're running new lines in your house for goodness sake! You won't be able to hear a gas leak since it is such low pressure, soap and water isn't foolproof under gas pressure, and by the time you smell it...It could be a real problem.

Plumbers use a 15psi dial gauge threaded onto the pipe. CLOSE OFF THE VALVES TO ALL APPLIANCES...They can't take the pressure the airtest involves. You can only test to the valves. Most gauges are 1/2" NPT, and you can get them at plumbing stores or some home centers. They have a schraeder valve just like your car tires. You use a compressor or a bike pump (yes, a bike pump) to air up the line and watch the gauge for at least 10 or 15 minutes to see if the pressure drops.

If the pressure drops, use a sprayer full of very soapy (liquid dish soap) water to spray every single connection. Really hose them down. Use a flashlight, and watch for bubbles to form. If the bubbles grow bigger, you've found a leak. At 10-15psi, the bubbles will be pretty easy to spot.

Alan 06-13-2008 08:49 PM

We usually leave our gauge on for about a day at least, and then come back and look at it. I believe our test only requires twice the pressure that is going to be run through the pipe, but we use a 30# gauge and pump it all the way up.

amakarevic 06-16-2008 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 130201)
Oh no! You gotta air test if you're running new lines in your house for goodness sake!

Dude - what do you pump into when the line is hooked to the meter ???

Joe F 06-16-2008 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 130782)
Dude - what do you pump into when the line is hooked to the meter ???

Use air, put a valve beetween the "old" line and the new. Do your test with that valve closed.


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