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-   -   Reconnecting PVC pipe to sump pump (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/reconnecting-pvc-pipe-sump-pump-21355/)

n0c7 05-23-2008 02:59 AM

Reconnecting PVC pipe to sump pump
 
Our 4 year old sump pump failed, it completely shattered its housing and ripped its own wiring out and flooded my basement closet.

Drained the water with a pump and tried to remove the sump pump. I figured it was just threaded on at the bottom, but after numerous awkward attempts and pulling my shoulder out of place, I had to cut the PVC. Once removed I was able to unthread it but now I have to reconnect the joint I cut. I'm sure there are tonnes of adapters to reconnect these pipes, but what kind of glue/sealant do I use? It appears that this had some sort of yellowish glue on the already existing joints.

Termite 05-23-2008 08:21 AM

Easily done! We need to determine what kind of pipe this is for sure.
If it is PVC it will be white, and will usually say "scedule 40" or "sch 40" in the printing on it. If it is ABS, it will be black plastic. The two should not be interchanged, so be sure you get the right material.

PVC is glued together with PVC solvent cement. You need to get a bottle of PVC cleaner, which goes in the joint right before the cement. The cleaner allows the cement to bond cleanly.

ABS works the same way, but be sure you buy cement that specifically lists ABS.

As for the repair, you can cut the pipe short enough to install a pipe-to-pipe glued butt connector. This will allow you to install a new length of pipe to reach the sump. Depending on how your pump hooks up, just buy the appropriate fitting. If the fitting requires a threaded connector, they make those in plastic, and they glue to the pipe. Just use a few wraps of thread tape on the threads.

mstplumber 05-23-2008 01:19 PM

n0c7,
KC is absolutely right, but I have a question. Is this an actual sump pump for removing groundwater and rain, or is it an Ejector pump which serves the basement plumbing? Some people call them both sump pumps.

If it is an Ejector pump you should have a check valve and a gate valve in the discharge line above the pump receptacle, with the check valve closest to the pump (beneath the gate valve). If not, you should install one. You can get these check valves with rubber couplings which install with 2 big hose clamps. This allows for easy repair and maintenance of the pump while preventing the pump from cycling due to the water from the discharge line flowing back through the pump into the receptacle. These valves are required by code in most areas.

If your pump is just a sump pump for ground and rain water, and does not connect to your plumbing system, you are probably OK without the valves, but they sure wouldn't hurt.

n0c7 05-23-2008 05:12 PM

thekctermite:

It's black ABS plastic, wasn't PVC like I thought. I ended up using a Fernco adapter, snugged the clamps tight and no leaks at all so far.

mstplumber:

It's about a 2 feet deep hole where the weeping tiles from around the house bring in water to. The sump pump kicks the water upwards into the black ABS piping, which runs up the basement wall, disappears but I can see it on the outside of the house, I was told it drains into the sewer system. Thats all I know about it, from what I've told you, what kind is it?

mstplumber 05-23-2008 05:34 PM

It sounds like just a sump pump. If it isn't for plumbing in your basement, and by plumbing I mean a bathroom or sink, it is just a sump pump. If you think there is a chance it connects to the sewer it wouldn't hurt to install a check valve, in case the sewer ever backs up. This would prevent sewage from filling up your basement.

n0c7 05-23-2008 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mstplumber (Post 125393)
It sounds like just a sump pump. If it isn't for plumbing in your basement, and by plumbing I mean a bathroom or sink, it is just a sump pump. If you think there is a chance it connects to the sewer it wouldn't hurt to install a check valve, in case the sewer ever backs up. This would prevent sewage from filling up your basement.

I don't think it directly connects to the sewer, I think it connects to the main house drain which in turn connects to the sewer - thats how it appears to look on the outside of the house. I can't remember if there was a check valve on the long run running through the basement wall as this was drywalled 1.5 years ago. If it connects to the main house drain, is it still necessary?

sevver 05-23-2008 07:59 PM

I have PVC unions on mine. I also have a spare with a PVC pipe and union on it cut to length already just in case.

n0c7 05-23-2008 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0c7 (Post 125420)
I don't think it directly connects to the sewer, I think it connects to the main house drain which in turn connects to the sewer - thats how it appears to look on the outside of the house. I can't remember if there was a check valve on the long run running through the basement wall as this was drywalled 1.5 years ago. If it connects to the main house drain, is it still necessary?

Well after thinking this over, I did some further research. Our city recommends the use of check valves, and the manual of the new sump pump says for it to operate properly that one must be installed. I spent the $18, cut the extra length, and installed it. Appears to work just fine. Damn cheap home builders!

I put the clamps pretty tight, doesn't appear to leak, but do they normally?

Termite 05-23-2008 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0c7 (Post 125445)
I put the clamps pretty tight, doesn't appear to leak, but do they normally?

A Fernco connector is normally fairly effective, but I wouldn't do it that way because it is just too easy to glue those pipes together.

n0c7 05-24-2008 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 125458)
A Fernco connector is normally fairly effective, but I wouldn't do it that way because it is just too easy to glue those pipes together.

In the end, I took advantage of installing the check valve in place of the Fernco, same different result. :thumbup:

n0c7 05-24-2008 11:05 PM

New question - now that I've upgraded to a 1/2 HP pump vs 1/4 HP pump and installed the check valve, on the outside of the house we actually get a tad bit of water coming out of the pipe. Before it seemed to all route through and disappear. There is not alot coming out, maybe 1 cup full each time it runs. It basically looks like this:


|
/|
|

The water would run straight up and the pipe disappears. The angle piece / is where water now comes out from.

Termite 05-25-2008 12:42 AM

I don't think I understand, so I'll take a guess. Is water coming out of the pipe at a fitting? Or are you just talking about the end of the pipe? I'm assuming we're talking about a fitting leak, because if your pump only spews one cup of water out the end of the pipe, something's wrong.

A stronger pump creates a little more pressure in the pipe, and that could have exposed a bad connection. If so, cut out that bad connection and get yourself the appropriate ABS glue fittings, use cleaner, and glue them in place!

n0c7 05-25-2008 03:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 125656)
I don't think I understand, so I'll take a guess. Is water coming out of the pipe at a fitting? Or are you just talking about the end of the pipe? I'm assuming we're talking about a fitting leak, because if your pump only spews one cup of water out the end of the pipe, something's wrong.

A stronger pump creates a little more pressure in the pipe, and that could have exposed a bad connection. If so, cut out that bad connection and get yourself the appropriate ABS glue fittings, use cleaner, and glue them in place!

I will take a picture ASAP. This is the drain outside. Before, no water would come out at all and you could just hear it running through. The drain outside does not end, it continues on somewhere... but also has an open elbow sticking out of the side of it where water is now coming out of since the upgraded pump. All fittings that I touched in the sump area appear to be leak free and operating correctly.


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